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Novak Djokovic: Tim Henman says ‘decisions have consequences’ after Serb was deported from Australia

‘If you want to play professional tennis, it’s a global sport… you MUST get vaccinated’: Tim Henman insists ‘decisions have consequences’ after Novak Djokovic was deported from Australia – adding that the visa- saga ‘has been a bad sight’ for everyone’

  • Novak Djokovic lost his late call to stay in Australia and has left the country
  • The world No. 1 visa saga has overshadowed the build-up to the Australian Open
  • Former UK No. 1 Tim Henman says the gray areas should have been resolved ‘long before Djokovic arrived at Melbourne border control’
  • Henman added that to play professional tennis now, given the global travel involved, ‘you need to be vaccinated’



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Tim Henman echoed Rafael Nadal’s sentiment of ‘decisions have consequences’ when asked about the visa spat for Novak Djokovic that led to the Serb being deported from Australia on Sunday.

The world No. 1 was set to begin defending his Australian Open title on Monday and pursuing a record-breaking 21st Grand Slam, but after the 34-year-old appealed his visa withdrawal for the second time, three judges unanimously decided that the star’s visa cancellation was legal.

While Djokovic was on the next plane home, former UK No. 1 Henman insisted that with year-round travel associated with life as a professional tennis player, it has become a reality that ‘you need to be vaccinated’.

Former UK No. 1 Tim Henman echoed Rafael Nadal's sentiment that 'decisions have consequences' when asked about the visa line for Novak Djokovic on Sunday

The Serb appealed the withdrawal of his visa for the second time, but three judges unanimously decided that the withdrawal of the star's visa was legal

The Serb appealed the withdrawal of his visa for the second time, but three judges unanimously decided that the withdrawal of the star's visa was legal

Former UK No. 1 Tim Henman echoed Rafael Nadal’s sentiment that ‘decisions have consequences’ when asked about the visa line for Novak Djokovic on Sunday

Djokovic (right), on the eve of the start of the Australian Open, is now on his way home

Djokovic (right), on the eve of the start of the Australian Open, is now on his way home

Djokovic (right), on the eve of the start of the Australian Open, is now on his way home

“Everyone has looked bad, be it Tennis Australia, the Victorian state or the Australian government,” Henman said. sports post.

“All I’m saying is that to be a professional tennis player there are certain things you have to do. Travel is one of them, if you don’t like it professional tennis becomes difficult.

“The reality is that if you look at the vaccination, if you want to play tennis professionally, it’s a global sport, you have to get vaccinated.

“I absolutely respect that every person has a choice. If they don’t want to get vaccinated, I respect that – that’s their choice. But as I think Rafael Nadal has said eloquently, decisions have consequences.

“If you look at the life of a professional tennis player, if you travel the world, it would be a lot easier if you were vaccinated.”

The Serbian star was withdrawn again on Friday over public anger in Australia

The Serbian star was withdrawn again on Friday over public anger in Australia

The Serbian star was withdrawn again on Friday over public anger in Australia

A saga that began on January 4 when Djokovic revealed he was traveling Down Under because he had been granted a ‘medical exemption’ to play at the Australian Open ended 12 days later with the nine-time champion heading home after a story that spread worldwide. made the headlines.

The unstabbed Serb said in a statement he was “extremely disappointed” with the court’s ruling and after the defending champion spent time in a Melbourne refugee detention center amid protests outside, AELTC board member Henman noted that the Australian government not the situation well.

“All these gray areas could and should have been resolved long before he actually arrived at border control in Melbourne,” said Henman, who works for Eurosport at the Australian Open, added.

The world's number 1 had practiced this week, but he is not participating in Melbourne now

The world's number 1 had practiced this week, but he is not participating in Melbourne now

The world’s number 1 had practiced this week, but he is not participating in Melbourne now

All this could have been prevented there. That’s the disappointing element for everyone.

“Before the Australian Open, which takes place in the state of Victoria in the country of Australia – and then Djokovic with his unvaccinated status – those agencies had to communicate much better to understand how things were going to go before it got to this stage.

“It’s not about being the best tennis player in the world, very famous or very rich, these are the rules for Australia. I don’t think the government has handled it very well.

“From my point of view as a tennis fan, I really want to draw the line because there have been so many great stories from the first few weeks of the season and you have a Grand Slam coming up, one of the cornerstones of our sport, and I want to that tennis will now speak, that’s for sure.’

NOVAK DJOKOVIC’S AUSTRALIAN OPEN EPIC VISA SAGA

Novak Djokovic’s defense of his Australian Open title remains in doubt after Australian immigration officials canceled his visa for the second time.

Here’s how the saga has unfolded:

January 4: Djokovic tweets that he is on his way to the Australian Open with medical exemption. He writes on Instagram: ‘I spent fantastic quality time with my loved ones during intermission and today I am going Down Under with a waiver clearance. On to 2022!!’

Jan 5 Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison warns Djokovic that he will be on the ‘next plane home’ if his medical exemption is deemed insufficient, and is adamant that Djokovic will not receive preferential treatment.

Jan 5 Djokovic’s visa is canceled upon his arrival in Melbourne. The Australian Border Force has announced that the player has “failed to provide adequate evidence to meet the eligibility requirements for Australia.”

6 January: Djokovic is sent to Park Hotel in Melbourne after being denied a visa. He launches an appeal, which is adjourned until January 10 in the morning. Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic says Djokovic is the victim of ‘persecution’.

January 9: Djokovic’s lawyers claim he was granted a vaccine exemption to enter Australia because he took a positive Covid-19 test in Serbia on December 16. However, social media posts suggest that he attended a number of social events in the days following his apparent diagnosis.

January 10: Djokovic’s visa withdrawal is overturned by Judge Anthony Kelly, who orders the Australian government to pay court costs and release Djokovic within half an hour. Djokovic says he is “satisfied and grateful” and wants to “stay and try to compete”.

January 11: Djokovic’s title defense remains in doubt as Australia’s Immigration Minister questions whether he should override the court’s ruling, allegedly over an allegedly misleading statement made by Djokovic on his entry form regarding his movements in the 14 days leading up to arrival in Australia.

January 12: Djokovic admits making a ‘error of judgment’ by attending an interview with a French journalist while Covid was positive. He adds that although he attended a children’s tennis event the day after the test, he was not notified of the positive test until after the event.

Jan 13: Djokovic will face compatriot Miomir Kecmanovic in the first round.

Jan 14: Immigration Minister Alex Hawke has canceled Djokovic’s visa for the second time, saying in a statement it was “for reasons of health and good order”.

Jan 16: A panel of three judges unanimously rejects Djokovic’s legal argument against his second visa cancellation. He now faces immediate eviction.

Reporting by PA

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