Novak Djokovic back in immigration detention ahead of his visa showdown – as big rival Rafael Nadal

Novak Djokovic is sent back to infamous immigration detention hotel pending final visa showdown as angry tennis superstars express frustration over world number one visa scandal

  • Novak Djokovic returns to notorious Melbourne immigration detention center
  • His Australian visa was canceled by the government for the second time on Friday
  • The world’s number 1 Serbian tennis star is considered a ‘risk to health and good order’
  • Anti-vax, pro-Novak and pro-asylum seekers protesters gathered in Melbourne
  • Rafa Nadal admitted being ‘tired’ of scandal, said no one bigger than the event



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Novak Djokovic returned to immigration detention after his visa was revoked again as top players lashed out at the unvaccinated champion.

Djokovic was driven into the Park Hotel complex in Melbourne’s Carlton on Saturday afternoon, where he is to remain until his appeal is heard in federal court on Monday morning.

On Saturday, at 8 a.m., he spoke to immigration officials at an undisclosed location. Border authorities subsequently detained Djokovic following a court order.

Djokovic’s lawyers then submitted their comments during the Federal Court’s online hearing, chaired by Judge David O’Callaghan in his law offices at 10:15 a.m.

Djokovic was driven into the grounds of the Park Hotel in Melbourne's Carlton on Saturday afternoon, where he must remain until his appeal is heard in federal court on Monday morning.

Djokovic was driven into the grounds of the Park Hotel in Melbourne’s Carlton on Saturday afternoon, where he must remain until his appeal is heard in federal court on Monday morning.

Media and protesters gathered outside the infamous detention center hotel where the unvaccinated Serbian star is housed

Media and protesters gathered outside the infamous detention center hotel where the unvaccinated Serbian star is housed

Media and protesters gathered outside the infamous detention center hotel where the unvaccinated Serbian star is housed

His excellent legal team is expected to have a harder time overturning the latest visa ban than on January 10, when an Australian Border Force official had him arrested the first time.

The Serbian superstar remains the center of global attention and a magnet for fiery debates on health, science, politics and immigration.

Antivax supporters and anti-immigration detention protesters gathered in the Rod Laver Arena and outside the infamous detention center that has housed some asylum seekers for years.

In the tennis stadium, 200 anti-vaccine protesters chanted “free Novak” and “let him play”, as well as various slogans against vaccines and mask mandates.

Young US Open champion Emma Raducanu said the scandal had become a distraction

Young US Open champion Emma Raducanu said the scandal had become a distraction

Young US Open champion Emma Raducanu said the scandal had become a distraction

Novak's Great Rival Rafa Nadal Said No One Is Greater Than The Australian Open

Novak's Great Rival Rafa Nadal Said No One Is Greater Than The Australian Open

Novak’s Great Rival Rafa Nadal Said No One Is Greater Than The Australian Open

Djokovic was seen arriving in the back of a white sedan as he re-entered the detention center wearing a green tracksuit and a white face mask.

When the Australian Open frontrunner was detained again, Spaniard Rafael Nadal, the rival who raced to claim a record 21 Grand Slam titles, admitted his annoyance at the focus on the Serbian superstar.

“Honestly, I’m a bit tired of the situation because I just think it’s important to talk about our sport, about tennis,” Nadal said.

“There is no player in history more important than an event, right? [It] will be a great Australian Open, with or without him.’

Meanwhile, brilliant young US Open champion Emma Raducanu spoke out, saying the scandal was a distraction.

“I feel like it’s kind of taken away from the great tennis that happened in Australia this summer… like it’s been a distraction that way.”

She believed that people missed the performances of other stars worthy of attention, such as returning Brit Andy Murray.

The main reasons behind Djokovic’s visa cancellation were revealed on Saturday when Secretary of State Alex Hawke said his presence in Australia could “promote anti-vaccination sentiment”.

The main reasons behind Novak Djokovic's visa cancellation have been revealed with Immigration Minister Alex Hawke saying his presence in Australia may foster anti-vaccination sentiment.

The main reasons behind Novak Djokovic's visa cancellation have been revealed with Immigration Minister Alex Hawke saying his presence in Australia may foster anti-vaccination sentiment.

The main reasons behind Novak Djokovic’s visa cancellation have been revealed with Immigration Minister Alex Hawke saying his presence in Australia may foster anti-vaccination sentiment.

Court documents show the reasons for the cancellation of Djokovic's visa by Mr Hawke

Court documents show the reasons for the cancellation of Djokovic's visa by Mr Hawke

Court documents show the reasons for the cancellation of Djokovic’s visa by Mr Hawke

Djokovic also posed a 'risk to the good order of the Australian community', Mr Hawke said, as his stay in Australia could cause 'public disruption' to the values ​​of Australian society

Djokovic also posed a 'risk to the good order of the Australian community', Mr Hawke said, as his stay in Australia could cause 'public disruption' to the values ​​of Australian society

Djokovic also posed a ‘risk to the good order of the Australian community’, Mr Hawke said, as his stay in Australia could cause ‘public disruption’ to the values ​​of Australian society

Hawke announced on Friday that he had revoked the Serbian tennis star’s visa for the second time, citing a long list of reasons, including that Djokovic showed an “apparent disdain” to isolate after a positive test result.

“I believe that Mr Djokovic’s continued presence in Australia could lead to an increase in anti-vaccination sentiment being generated in the Australian community, potentially leading to an increase in civil unrest as previously experienced in Australia.” with demonstrations and protests that are themselves a source of community transmission,” said Mr Hawke, as court documents show.

The drama surrounding the Novak Djokovic affair will be captured in a docuseries that will be a tennis version of Drive To Survive.

sports post understands that there is already a crew in Australia to film what has been the most explosive start to a tennis season in recent years, thanks to the world No. 1 fiasco.

The sport’s usually disjointed governing stakeholders have banded together to support and approve the new project, which will eventually air on Netflix.

NOVAK DJOKOVIC’S AUSTRALIAN OPEN EPIC VISA SAGA

Novak Djokovic’s defense of his Australian Open title remains in doubt after Australian immigration officials canceled his visa for the second time.

Here’s how the saga has unfolded:

January 4: Djokovic tweets that he is on his way to the Australian Open with medical exemption. He writes on Instagram: ‘I spent fantastic quality time with my loved ones during intermission and today I am going Down Under with a waiver clearance. On to 2022!!’

Jan 5 Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison warns Djokovic that he will be on the ‘next plane home’ if his medical exemption is deemed insufficient, and is adamant that Djokovic will not receive preferential treatment.

Jan 5 Djokovic’s visa is canceled upon his arrival in Melbourne. The Australian Border Force has announced that the player has “failed to provide adequate evidence to meet the eligibility requirements for Australia.”

6 January: Djokovic is sent to Park Hotel in Melbourne after being denied a visa. He launches an appeal, which is adjourned until January 10 in the morning. Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic says Djokovic is the victim of ‘persecution’.

January 9: Djokovic’s lawyers claim he was granted a vaccine exemption to enter Australia because he took a positive Covid-19 test in Serbia on December 16. However, social media posts suggest that he attended a number of social events in the days following his apparent diagnosis.

January 10: Djokovic’s visa withdrawal is overturned by Judge Anthony Kelly, who orders the Australian government to pay court costs and release Djokovic within half an hour. Djokovic says he is “satisfied and grateful” and wants to “stay and try to compete”.

January 11: Djokovic’s title defense remains in doubt as Australia’s Immigration Minister questions whether he should override the court’s ruling, allegedly over an allegedly misleading statement made by Djokovic on his entry form regarding his movements in the 14 days leading up to arrival in Australia.

January 12: Djokovic admits making a ‘error of judgment’ by attending an interview with a French journalist while Covid was positive. He adds that although he attended a children’s tennis event the day after the test, he was not notified of the positive test until after the event.

Jan 13: Djokovic will face compatriot Miomir Kecmanovic in the first round.

Jan 14: Immigration Minister Alex Hawke has canceled Djokovic’s visa for the second time, saying in a statement it was “for reasons of health and good order”.

Reporting by PA

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