Advertisements
North Korea The Pyongyang 2425 device only has government approved apps and is unable to connect to foreign WiFi. The Kim regime has released a new smartphone that is unable to access information about the outside world

North Korea releases its own smartphone made by a Chinese manufacturer that promotes government propaganda sites and blocks access to the foreign internet

  • The Pyongyang 2425, made in China, only runs apps that have been approved by the government
  • It is unable to access foreign WiFi or information about the outside world
  • Users can connect to & # 39; Mirae & # 39; WiFi of the state and connect to propaganda sites
  • Experts say that devices were imported before North Korean software was installed
Advertisements

North Korea has released its own smartphone that only manages government approved apps and is unable to connect to foreign WiFi.

The Pyongyang 2425 device only has access to & # 39; Mirae & # 39; WiFi, an intranet network that is used by the state and with which only government-approved apps can be used.

Although the isolated nation has a famous, independent philosophy, The serial number of the gadget indicates that it was made in China.

Scroll down for video

Advertisements

North Korea The Pyongyang 2425 device only has government approved apps and is unable to connect to foreign WiFi. The Kim regime has released a new smartphone that is unable to access information about the outside world

North Korea The Pyongyang 2425 device only has government approved apps and is unable to connect to foreign WiFi. The Kim regime has released a new smartphone that is unable to access information about the outside world

WHAT IS & # 39; MIRAE & # 39; WIFI?

Korean central television has recently broadcast a number of messages about a new wireless field service in Pyongyang.

The service is apparently based on WiFi, but unusually requires a SIM card for access.

It is called & # 39; Mirae & # 39 ;, what & # 39; future & # 39; means and is going on according to reports in the center of Pyongyang.

It is the first time that an outdoor WiFi service has been mentioned in North Korean media and is being implemented alongside two mobile networks operating in the country that offer wireless data service.

Just like a standard smartphone, the device is powered by an eight-core processor, can be charged wirelessly and has face recognition technology.

Advertisements

It is unable to connect to foreign WiFi and even blocks users from opening standard photos and ringtones that appear on the phone.

South Korean news service Daily Dutch Championship, has purchased one of the phones and discovered that it was made by a Chinese manufacturer by checking the serial number.

According to experts, the devices were probably imported as a finished product before North Korean software was installed.

& # 39; North Korea could have ordered the production of the phones with mutual understanding that they would replace the software & # 39 ;, an expert told Daily NK on condition of anonymity.

& # 39; Although changing the software can cause some functionality issues, regardless of the type of hardware being used, North Korea may have changed the phone's software after it was imported.

Like an ordinary smartphone, the device is powered by an eight-core processor, can be charged wirelessly and has face recognition technology. It is unable to connect to foreign WiFi and even blocks users from opening pre-installed photos on the phone
Advertisements

Like an ordinary smartphone, the device is powered by an eight-core processor, can be charged wirelessly and has face recognition technology. It is unable to connect to foreign WiFi and even blocks users from opening pre-installed photos on the phone

Like an ordinary smartphone, the device is powered by an eight-core processor, can be charged wirelessly and has face recognition technology. It is unable to connect to foreign WiFi and even blocks users from opening pre-installed photos on the phone

The South Korean news service Daily NK acquired one of the phones and discovered that it was made by a Chinese manufacturer by checking the serial number. According to experts, the devices were probably imported as a finished product before North Korean software was installed

The South Korean news service Daily NK acquired one of the phones and discovered that it was made by a Chinese manufacturer by checking the serial number. According to experts, the devices were probably imported as a finished product before North Korean software was installed

The South Korean news service Daily NK acquired one of the phones and discovered that it was made by a Chinese manufacturer by checking the serial number. According to experts, the devices were probably imported as a finished product before North Korean software was installed

Photos of the government-released gadget show that it has apps for learning Chinese and English and a government-approved encyclopedia and weather app.

Advertisements

The library app appears to give users access to state-approved reading material.

Due to the lack of internet in the country, North Koreans have previously been unable to download apps and have had to go to a store where technicians install them.

Although it is unclear whether that will change with the Pyongyang 2425.

North Korea has been making smartphones for five years, with three brands produced domestically for sale: Arirang, Pyongyang and Jindallae.

The number of users was 3.8 million in 2017, which corresponds to 15% of the population, according to the South Korean statistical office.

Advertisements

While smartphones make life easier for many North Koreans, the government in Pyongyang does not allow connections to the outside world.

The South Korean Ministry of Cooperation said the regime is concerned that people & # 39; unhealthy & # 39; obtain information that could threaten the Kim Jung Un dynasty.

Some residents who live near the Chinese border can access the internet through China's wireless network, based on reports from North Korean defectors.

But it is extremely risky for anyone caught to listen to & # 39; enemy & # 39; broadcasts or has access to information from outside the country faces five years of forced labor, according to the ministry of association.

. [TagsToTranslate] Dailymail