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Sadie Cameron, eight (photo), from Fargo, North Dakota, swam in a public swimming pool with her mother in July when she fell ill

The parents of an eight-year-old girl say that after swimming in a public swimming pool she is fighting a rare kidney disease.

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Sadie Cameron, from Fargo, North Dakota, had a nice day in the pool with her mother in July when she suddenly started complaining that her stomach ached and vomited.

She was in a hurry to visit a doctor who diagnosed her with E. coli infection, which she suspected was contracted by the pool, reported Valley News Live.

Two days later, Sadie only got worse and was hospitalized for dehydration.

It was then that doctors discovered that the infection had caused kidney damage, making Sadie dependent on dialysis and probably needing an organ transplant in the future.

Sadie Cameron, eight (photo), from Fargo, North Dakota, swam in a public swimming pool with her mother in July when she fell ill

She visited a doctor who diagnosed her with a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infection, which she probably contracted from the swimming pool. Pictured: Sadie

She visited a doctor who diagnosed her with a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infection, which she probably contracted from the swimming pool. Pictured: Sadie

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Sadie Cameron, eight (left and right), from Fargo, North Dakota, swam in a public swimming pool with her mother in July when she fell ill. She visited a doctor who diagnosed her with a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infection, which she probably contracted from the swimming pool

Two days later, on July 19, Sadie was hospitalized at the Sanford Medical Center in Fargo after showing no signs of improvement. Pictured: Sadie (left) with her sister Callie (center) and her mother Katie (right) during dialysis

Two days later, on July 19, Sadie was hospitalized at the Sanford Medical Center in Fargo after showing no signs of improvement. Pictured: Sadie (left) with her sister Callie (center) and her mother Katie (right) during dialysis

Two days later, on July 19, Sadie was hospitalized at the Sanford Medical Center in Fargo after showing no signs of improvement. Pictured: Sadie (left) with her sister Callie (center) and her mother Katie (right) during dialysis

After her first symptoms appeared, on July 17, Sadie was taken to a doctor who diagnosed her with a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infection.

These infections come from E. coli (Escherichia coli), bacteria that generally live in the gut of healthy people and animals.

Most species are harmless, but a few produce a powerful toxin called Shiga toxin, which damages the lining of the small intestine.

Infections occur when people come into contact with human or animal faeces or eat contaminated food or drink contaminated water.

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Doctors told Sadie & # 39; s parents that she probably contracted E. coli while she was at the public swimming pool.

& # 39; One day it makes a big difference, & # 39; her mother, Katie, told Valley News Live. & # 39; It has turned our lives upside down a bit. & # 39;

Two days later, on July 19, Sadie was admitted to the Sanford Medical Center hospital after experiencing symptoms such as diarrhea, according to a CaringBridge page.

Doctors found that she was extremely dehydrated and addicted her to an infusion.

After performing tests, the medical team discovered that Sadie's condition was much worse and diagnosed her hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS).

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HUS is a type of kidney failure, characterized by abnormal destruction of platelets and red blood cells.

The damaged blood cells can block the kidney filter system, which according to the Mayo Clinic can lead to life-threatening kidney failure.

Sadie (photo) was diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure that is often the result of STEC infections

Sadie (photo) was diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure that is often the result of STEC infections

She was transferred to the Pediatric Intensive Care Department at Sanford Children's Hospital in Sioux Falls so she could start dialysis. On the photo: Sadie in the hospital

She was transferred to the Pediatric Intensive Care Department at Sanford Children's Hospital in Sioux Falls so she could start dialysis. On the photo: Sadie in the hospital

Sadie (left and right) was diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure that is often the result of STEC infections. She was transferred to the Pediatric Intensive Care Department at Sanford Children's Hospital in Sioux Falls so she could start dialysis

Sadie currently travels to Minneapolis twice a week for dialysis and will probably need a kidney transplant in the future. Pictured: Sadie (center) with her father Topher (left) and her sister Callie (right)
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Sadie currently travels to Minneapolis twice a week for dialysis and will probably need a kidney transplant in the future. Pictured: Sadie (center) with her father Topher (left) and her sister Callie (right)

Sadie currently travels to Minneapolis twice a week for dialysis and will probably need a kidney transplant in the future. Pictured: Sadie (center) with her father Topher (left) and her sister Callie (right)

Anyone can develop HUS, but it usually occurs in young children after being infected with certain strains of E. coli.

The Shiga toxins were attached to receptors on white blood cells in the gut, allowing them to travel to the kidneys.

HUS due to a STEC infection is estimated to occur in one to three per 100,000 people in the general population, according to the National Organization for Rare Disorders.

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Sadie was transferred to the Pediatric Intensive Care Department at Sanford Children's Hospital in Sioux Falls so she could start dialysis.

& # 39; It was pretty scary & # 39 ;, Katie told Valley News Live. & # 39; It's pretty traumatic to see that (by chance) your own child. & # 39;

At one point, Sadie was on dialysis 24 hours a day, but now the family is traveling to Minneapolis for treatment twice a week for three hours at a time.

Her medical team told her parents that Sadie probably needs a kidney transplant along the way.

& # 39; Everyone said she was a healthy young girl and that she will bounce back and that is true, & # 39; Katie told Valley News Live.

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