North Carolina County Bans Coca-Cola Vending Machines Due To ‘Wake Up’ Position On Georgia Voting Law

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A North Carolina county has removed Coca-Cola vending machines from its office buildings in protest at the company’s “wakeful” stance on an electoral law in Georgia.

Van Tucker, a Surry County commissioner, said: Fox news on Friday that he decided to remove the county’s 12 vending machines after Coca-Cola CEO James Quincey criticized a draft bill signed in Georgia in April.

Tucker described Georgia’s controversial voting law as a way for the Peach State to ensure a “fair and free” election — though critics have called the law an attempt at voter suppression, claiming it unfairly restricts minorities from voting.

The county’s board of commissioners, the legislative body, approved the ban by 3-2 votes at a meeting on May 17. Surry County was won by former President Donald Trump in both the 2016 and 2020 elections.

“I didn’t want it to be contagious in other states. And you know, I felt so strongly about it and our board did — we decided to just stand up and say something and do something about it,” Tucker told Fox News.

Van Tucker, a Surry County commissioner, told Fox News on Friday that he had decided to remove the county's 12 vending machines.

Van Tucker, a Surry County commissioner, told Fox News on Friday that he had decided to remove the county’s 12 vending machines.

Tucker described Georgia's controversial voting law as a way for Peach State to ensure 'fair and free' elections

Tucker described Georgia’s controversial voting law as a way for Peach State to ensure ‘fair and free’ elections

The move comes after Coca-Cola CEO James Quincey criticized a Georgia law signed in April

The move comes after Coca-Cola CEO James Quincey criticized a Georgia law signed in April

Tucker received an email from a Coca-Cola subsidiary asking the county to change its mind about removing the vending machines

Tucker received an email from a Coca-Cola subsidiary asking the county to change its mind about removing the vending machines

Tucker said it was important to “stand up” against Coca-Cola, as the county would not be able to reach every major corporation he claims is “interfering” with election integrity.

“This awakened culture that seems to be trying to reshape America as we know it is enough,” he said.

He added: “There is strength in numbers and courage can be brave at times.”

Coca-Cola said in a statement to The Washington Examiner that representatives of the company’s local bottler have contacted the county commissioners and “look forward to continuing their productive discussions with those officials.”

Tucker received an email from a Coca-Cola subsidiary asking the county to change its mind about removing the vending machines, he told Fox News.

Ed Harris, another district commissioner, wrote a letter to Quincey obtained by: NBC News in which he reprimanded the CEO for “corporate political commentary in favor of the Democratic party.”

“Our council felt that this was the best way to take a stand and express our disappointment at Coca-Cola’s actions, which are not representative of most of our citizens’ views,” Harris wrote to Quincey. .

“Our council hopes other organizations across the country take similar stances against Coca-Cola and sincerely wishes that future marketing efforts and comments from your company take more account of the views of all of your customers.”

The vending machine spat comes after Quincey wrote in a blog post for Coca-Cola, headquartered in Atlanta, that he was “disappointed” that the Georgia voting law had been passed.

“Voting is a fundamental right in America, and we’ve long advocated efforts to make voting easier,” Quincey wrote.

“We want to be crystal clear and state unequivocally that we are disappointed with the outcome of the Georgian voting law. Throughout Georgia’s Legislative Assembly, we provided feedback to members of both legislative chambers and political parties, opposing measures in the bills that would reduce or discourage access to vote.”

He added: “Our approach has always been to work with stakeholders to advocate for positive change, and we will continue to work with lawmakers, advocacy groups, business leaders and others to ensure broad access to voices is available to every eligible voter in our home state.”

“In addition, our focus now is on supporting federal legislation that protects access to vote and tackles voter suppression across the country,” he said.

“We all have a duty to protect everyone’s voting rights, and we will continue to stand up for what is right in Georgia and across the US.”

After the bill was passed, President Joe Biden rejected it in a… statement of the White House as “Jim Crow in the 21st Century,” while urging Congress to pass national ballots preferred by Democrats.

Joe Biden had labeled a new Georgia voting bill as 'Jim Crow in the 21st century' as he urged Congress to pass national ballots favored by Democrats

Joe Biden had labeled a new Georgia voting bill as ‘Jim Crow in the 21st century’ as he urged Congress to pass national ballots favored by Democrats

Gov. Brian Kemp said there's 'nothing Jim Crow' about Georgia's new voting lawwet

Gov. Brian Kemp said there’s ‘nothing Jim Crow’ about Georgia’s new voting lawwet

The sweeping rewrite of Georgia’s electoral rules was the first major set of changes since former President Donald Trump’s repeated, baseless claims of fraud following his presidential loss to Biden.

People who submit absentee ballots must show a driver’s license or ID, and in addition to that, they must provide additional ID.

The law also extended the weekend snap vote in the general election, but shortened the time for the second round from nine weeks to four. And early voting dropboxes can now only be placed in early voting locations rather than in additional places like libraries and other government buildings that may be more convenient for some voters.

Much of the electoral management work in Georgia is done by the state’s 159 counties. The law gives the state election commission new powers to intervene in provincial election offices and to remove and replace local election officials.

That has raised concerns that the Republican-controlled state administration could exert more influence over the running of the elections, including the certification of provincial results.

Protesters gather to voice their opposition to a sweeping overhaul of Georgia's electoral laws.  Voting rights groups say the new law will target black residents who make up about a third of the state's population bevolking

Protesters gather to voice their opposition to a sweeping overhaul of Georgia’s electoral laws. Voting rights groups say the new law will target black residents who make up about a third of the state’s population bevolking

The bill was signed by Georgia Governor Brian Kemp and includes restrictive measures, including the abolition of mobile ballot boxes that reduced long lines on election day, and the criminalized distribution of food or water to anyone waiting in line to vote.

The bill was signed by Georgia Governor Brian Kemp and includes restrictive measures, including the abolition of mobile ballot boxes that reduced long lines on election day, and the criminalized distribution of food or water to anyone waiting in line to vote.

Volunteers at Democracy Delicious hand out food and drinks to voters lining up at a polling station in Austell, Georgia.  State's new law has criminalized the distribution of food or water to people waiting to vote stemmen

Volunteers at Democracy Delicious hand out food and drinks to voters lining up at a polling station in Austell, Georgia. State’s new law has criminalized the distribution of food or water to people waiting to vote stemmen

The new law makes it a crime to hand out “money or gifts, including but not limited to food and drink” to anyone in line to vote. The ban extends to 50 feet from a polling station and 25 feet from any person standing in line.

Proponents of the law say they are trying to crack down on political organizations or advocacy groups that try to influence voters just before they cast a vote.

Critics say it is cruel and would punish even impartial groups or individuals for something as simple as giving water to someone waiting in a long line.

Coca-Cola’s stance on Georgia’s electoral law came under fire as the latest example of “awakened capitalism,” the term used to describe large corporations getting involved in progressive issues.

The term was coined by conservative blogger Ross Douthat in 2015 in an article she wrote for The New York Times, according to Heritage Foundation.

Twitter user Chrys O’Theras orphan following a recent example of “capitalism awakening,” noting major brands that have incorporated Pride colors into the logos for their flagship corporate accounts – though they don’t include Pride colors in the company’s accounts focused on the Middle East, where strict laws prohibit homosexuality completely.

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