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North Carolina community college begins ‘virtual Fridays’ due to ‘ever-rising costs of gasoline’

North Carolina community college begins ‘virtual Fridays’ with operations shifting online one day a week due to ‘ever-rising cost of gasoline’

  • Southwestern Community College, NC, offers all classes virtually on Fridays
  • School in Sylva, North Carolina announced the decision online earlier this month
  • Coming as President Biden called on oil companies to cut the cost of gasoline
  • He blamed Putin’s invasion of Ukraine for the rise in gas prices, to $4.95 a gallon

A North Carolina community college has begun offering virtual classes on Fridays, with activities shifting online one day a week due to rising gas prices.

Southwestern Community College, in Sylva, North Carolina, announced the decision earlier this month on the school’s website, blaming the “ever-rising cost of gasoline.”

It read, “Due to the ever-increasing cost of gasoline, the Southwestern Community College board has decided to begin virtual operations every Friday at all SCC campuses and locations starting June 10.”

It’s because gas prices average $4.95 a gallon, according to AAA, nearly $2 year over year.

President Joe Biden last night called on oil companies to cut the cost of gas, arguing the nation is in a “time of war.”

He and his government have repeatedly blamed the Russian president, calling the high cost of goods and services “Putin’s price hike.”

Southwestern Community College in North Carolina has begun teaching on Friday, shifting activities online one day a week due to rising gas prices

Southwestern Community College in North Carolina has begun teaching on Friday, shifting activities online one day a week due to rising gas prices

The college's decision comes because, according to AAA, gas prices average $4.95 a gallon, nearly $2 year over year

The college’s decision comes because, according to AAA, gas prices average $4.95 a gallon, nearly $2 year over year

Southwestern Community College said operations would continue online as usual, with all staff still working remotely, although most school buildings would be closed on Fridays.

Southwestern isn’t the first community college to put classes online as a result of rising prices.

Southwest Tennessee Community College announced in May that all classes and activities would be held online from May 27 to August 12, with in-person classes on August 15. c

A spokesperson for the college said Campus reform the decision was made to help students and staff who are ‘significantly affected’ by rising gas prices.

President Biden last night called on oil companies to cut the cost of gas.

“For the companies that run gas stations and set prices at the pump, this is a time of war, global danger, Ukraine, these are not normal times,” he said in a White House speech.

“Reduce the price you charge at the pump to reflect the price you pay for the product. Do it now. Do it today. Your customers, the American people, they need help now.”

President Joe Biden last night called on oil companies to cut the cost of gas, arguing the nation is in a 'time of war'

President Joe Biden last night called on oil companies to cut the cost of gas, arguing the nation is in a ‘time of war’

Biden called the high cost of goods and services “Putin’s price hike.”

“We could have turned a blind eye to Putin’s murderous ways. The price of gas would not have risen as much as it is now,” he said.

‘And I wasn’t alone. The American people understood. The American people stood at the time. The American people did what they had always done, defend freedom around the world.

“They chose to stand with the Ukrainian people. We had almost unanimous support in Congress, the Democrats, the Republicans and the Independents for their support of Ukraine when we knew all too well the cost,” he said.

Biden also called on Congress to suspend federal gas until September — a plan Republicans oppose and even some Democrats are hesitating, out of concern that the savings could end up in the pockets of oil companies rather than consumers.

In his remarks, the president also addressed his critics who blame him and his economic policies for record high inflation, which has pushed food, gas and housing prices up.

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