NOAA reveals the strangest creatures found in the southeastern United States

On July 1, the last day of the dive, the researchers glimpsed the mysterious lizardfish about 1,771 meters (5,810 feet) deep. Lizardfish has male and female organs, and can grow to more than two feet long

The NOAA Okeanos Explorer completed its mission to investigate the poorly understood waters of the southeastern United States last week, revealing an impressive view of life thousands of meters below the surface.

From the adorable big-eyed "deep sea ball" to the fierce-looking lizardfish, scientists operating a remote vehicle encountered all kinds of beautiful and unusual creatures during the 17 "Windows to the Deep" dives.

The mission came to an end on July 2 after more than a month of mapping and observation of the continental margin of the Southeast of the United States, which extends from Florida to North Carolina.

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On July 1, the last day of the dive, the researchers glimpsed the mysterious lizardfish about 1,771 meters (5,810 feet) deep. Lizardfish has male and female organs, and can grow to more than two feet long

On July 1, the last day of the dive, the researchers glimpsed the mysterious lizardfish about 1,771 meters (5,810 feet) deep. Lizardfish has male and female organs, and can grow to more than two feet long

The dives began on May 22, beginning an ocean exploration mission in two parts in the deep-water areas of the southeast, which is said to contain "some of the least explored areas" of the east coast.

On July 1, the last day of the dive, the researchers glimpsed the mysterious lizardfish about 1,771 meters (5,810 feet) deep.

The menacing deep-water fish of the batisosaur genus has a ghostly pale face with lifeless black eyes and a large mouth full of sharp teeth.

According to National Geographic, lizardfish have both male and female organs, which allows them to mate with any member of their species.

These terrifying fish can reach more than two feet long and wait to ambush their prey.

Another highlight was the strange but adorable "squid dumpling", which is actually considered a modified cuttlefish

Another highlight was the strange but adorable "squid dumpling", which is actually considered a modified cuttlefish

These cephalopods, known as bobtail squid, are not closely related to squid or cuttlefish, according to NOAA.

These cephalopods, known as bobtail squid, are not closely related to squid or cuttlefish, according to NOAA.

Another highlight was the strange but adorable "squid dumpling", which is actually considered a modified cuttlefish. These cephalopods, known as bobtail squid, are not closely related to squid or cuttlefish, according to the NOAA.

The team also found a dazzling pink and orange creature thought to be a colonial hydroid, along with a type of anemone never seen before.

These creatures were discovered during an exploration of the huge submarine landslide known as the Currituck Landslide, "where a massive, partially intact segment of the continental slope detached and slid to depths in excess of 2,000 meters (more than 6,562 feet). "

Between May and the beginning of July, researchers found countless remarkable marine animals. Among the most common in Dive 16 are the eelpout and the iridescent greeneye fish.

The team also encountered a mola mola, or ocean sunfish, for the first time in the 2018 expedition in the region.

Between May and the beginning of July, researchers found countless remarkable marine animals, including the anemone never seen before.

Between May and the beginning of July, researchers found countless remarkable marine animals, including the anemone never seen before.

Between May and the beginning of July, researchers found countless remarkable marine animals, including the anemone never seen before.

The team also found an impressive pink and orange creature that was thought to be a colonial hydroid, shown above

The team also found an impressive pink and orange creature that was thought to be a colonial hydroid, shown above

The team also found an impressive pink and orange creature that was thought to be a colonial hydroid, shown above

Another highlight was the strange but adorable "squid dumpling", which is actually considered a modified cuttlefish.

These cephalopods, known as bobtail squid, are not closely related to squid or cuttlefish, according to the NOAA.

"They have fins and when they are sitting or buried in the bottom, their fins are so tight around the body that they are difficult to distinguish", explain the experts.

The dives began on May 22, beginning an ocean exploration mission in two parts in the deepwater areas of the southeast

The dives began on May 22, beginning an ocean exploration mission in two parts in the deepwater areas of the southeast

The team also encountered a mola mola, or ocean sunfish, for the first time in the 2018 expedition in the region.

The team also encountered a mola mola, or ocean sunfish, for the first time in the 2018 expedition in the region.

The dives began on May 22, beginning an ocean exploration mission in two parts in the deepwater areas of the southeast. The team came across a mola mola (right) or oceanic sunfish, for the first time in the 2018 expedition in the region.

The NOAA Okeanos Explorer completed its mission to investigate the little-known waters of the southeastern United States last week, revealing an impressive view of life thousands of feet below the surface. An Atlantic Midshipman, with one of the fastest attacks in the ocean, is shown

The NOAA Okeanos Explorer completed its mission to investigate the little-known waters of the southeastern United States last week, revealing an impressive view of life thousands of feet below the surface. An Atlantic Midshipman, with one of the fastest attacks in the ocean, is shown

The NOAA Okeanos Explorer completed its mission to investigate the little-known waters of the southeastern United States last week, revealing an impressive view of life thousands of feet below the surface. An Atlantic Midshipman, with one of the fastest attacks in the ocean, is shown

The expedition also captured the shocking moment when an excavator fish called Atlantic Midshipman launches a rapid attack on an unsuspecting fish swimming nearby.

It looks like a flurry of dust, but a closer look reveals the impressive demolition in action.

"These fish are ambush predators, like fishermen and lizardfish, and have some of the fastest attacks of any fish," says NOAA.

"So fast that you need a video in super slow motion to really see what is happening."

The mission came to an end on July 2 after more than a month of mapping and observation of the Southeast US Continental Margin. UU., Which extends from Florida to North Carolina.

The mission came to an end on July 2 after more than a month of mapping and observation of the Southeast US Continental Margin. UU., Which extends from Florida to North Carolina.

The mission came to an end on July 2 after more than a month of mapping and observation of the Southeast US Continental Margin. UU., Which extends from Florida to North Carolina.

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