Nike has misspelled its own name on new Ancient Greek themed trainers

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Just don’t! Nike embarrassingly misspells its own logo on a pair of ancient Greek themed trainers that read ‘piks’

  • The latest collection is a nod to their namesake, the Greek goddess of victory, Nike
  • The Greek letters that look like it spells the name in English actually spells ‘piks’
  • Users were quick to cite errors, as one said there are “11 million people to ask”

Nike has embarrassingly misspelled its own brand name on a new pair of ancient Greek themed sneakers.

The sportswear giant is releasing its latest collection with a nod to its namesake, the Greek goddess of victory, Nike.

But the letters on the back of the shoe — which look like it says Nike in English letters — actually spell “piks” in Greek.

The correct spelling of the logo in Greek would be NIKH, and people are so outraged that a Change.org petition has been launched to urge the brand to pull the trainers from sale.

NIKE embarrassingly misspelled its OWN brand name on a new pair of Ancient Greek themed sneakers because they wrote

NIKE embarrassingly misspelled its OWN brand name on a new pair of Ancient Greek themed sneakers because they wrote “piks” on the back

Eagle-eyed Greek speakers saw the gaffe on the Air Force 1s, which have an unusual tongue that resembles wings.

Zoe Gardner raged, “Oh, I can’t believe it. These make me so angry.

“I know it doesn’t matter, only an idiot would wear shoes that say ‘piks’ in Greek letters and think they have Nike on them, and I wouldn’t care what shoes idiots wear, but my God, I get so mad about it.

The sportswear giant releases its latest collection with a nod to its namesake, the Greek goddess of victory, Nike

The sportswear giant releases its latest collection with a nod to its namesake, the Greek goddess of victory, Nike

Eagle-eyed Greek speakers saw the blunder on the Air Force 1s, as one wrote that there are '11 million Greeks' the brand could have consulted

Eagle-eyed Greek speakers saw the blunder on the Air Force 1s, as one wrote that there are ’11 million Greeks’ the brand could have consulted

‘There are 11 million Greeks. Ask for one.’

In a follow-up tweet, she added: “I didn’t even count the Cypriots, classical students and general people who know basic stuff.

“Damn it, it makes me so unreasonably angry.”

Another user said: ‘You can be mathematicians, physicists and computer scientists. Abuse of * and * should be punishable.’

The new line of shoes has caused a stir and the new style has tongues that look like wings

The new line of shoes has caused a stir and the new style has tongues that look like wings

Other users mock the pronunciation of the brand name, as mentioned, they would call them Piks from now on

Other users mock the pronunciation of the brand name, as mentioned, they would call them Piks from now on

A third mocked: “Very cool, very cool, I’m going to refer to Nike products as ‘Piks’ from now on, because that’s clearly what they want.”

and dr. David Harvey quipped, ‘For reference friends. This concludes the debate about the pronunciation of the word ‘Nike’.

“If it is translated into Greek, as they have done here, we now know that it should be pronounced ‘Piks’.”

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