Nigerian prince accused of scamming NY job seekers appears in court

A Nigerian prince accused of fooling hundreds of job seekers out of thousands of dollars by promising them that expensive paying gigs on Thursday in the court of Manhattan appeared with a special request.

Osmond Eweka, 31, asked a judge in the case for permission to travel to Nigeria for the upcoming birth of his child. The judge will decide next month whether or not to approve it.

Photo's made by DailyMail.com in court allow an enthusiastic Eweka to speak with his lawyer while he is dressed in a navy suit and a navy polka tie for his appearance.

The District Attorney's Office of Manhattan said that the royal and his friend, Kamel McKay, 27, had claimed earlier this year that they had to run two Manhattan consulting firms to tell customers that if they were to pay a fee, they would different jobs in New York City would be placed.

Prosecutors said that some of the jobs promised by Eweka and McKay were their victims for hotel management and reception receptionists. The men used the popular job-seeking website Indeed.com to find them.

Osmond Eweka, a Nigerian prince, is accused of swindling New York jobseekers from thousands of dollars by promising them to find work. He wants to travel to Nigeria for the birth of his baby

Osmond Eweka, a Nigerian prince, is accused of swindling New York jobseekers from thousands of dollars by promising them to find work. He wants to travel to Nigeria for the birth of his baby

A judge will decide next month whether or not to approve the request

A judge will decide next month whether or not to approve the request

A judge will decide next month whether or not to approve the request

Eweka pleaded guilty to charges of theft and a schedule to deceive in July

Eweka pleaded guilty to charges of theft and a schedule to deceive in July

Eweka pleaded guilty to charges of theft and a schedule to deceive in July

Osmond Eweka, left, dressed in a navy suit and a navy polka tie for the lawsuit Thursday in Manhattan

Osmond Eweka, left, dressed in a navy suit and a navy polka tie for the lawsuit Thursday in Manhattan

Osmond Eweka, left, dressed in a navy suit and a navy polka tie for the lawsuit Thursday in Manhattan

HOW EWEKA AND ITS ACCUMPOLS IMPORTED THEIR VICTIMS

Eweka and his friend, Kamel McKay, 27, pretended to run consultancy firms in Manhattan in January 2018.

According to court documents, Eweka and McKay used office space in the Empire State Building and another building on 5th Avenue.

Here they operated two fake employment agencies, Stamford Consulting Firm and Howard Consulting Group.

Eweka and McKay used the popular job-seeking website Indeed.com to find their victims.

They lured customers in by telling them if they were paying a fee, that they would be placed in different jobs in New York City.

The men also used false names.

The alleged scam closed in June 2018, shortly before they were arrested for crimes and accused of theft and an arrangement to commit fraud.

According to court documents, Eweka and McKay used office space in the Empire State Building and another building on the fifth lane to run two fake employment agencies, Stamford Consulting Firm and Howard Consulting Group.

They also used fake names, according to the New York Post.

Eweka went by the name Sean Jackson and McKay allegedly used the name Tyrone Hayes.

Prosecutors said they would invite their victims to their office for an interview and then pay a fee ranging from $ 300 to $ 700, the Post reported.

Prosecutor Catherine McCaw said they told the victims that the compensation would cover the costs of uniforms, training and background checks.

They also said that paying the high compensation would result in well-paid jobs.

"But in reality there was no such job," she said Thursday during Eweka's detention in the Manhattan Supreme Court.

After collecting the money, the men sent job seekers to different companies, where they were rejected by employers who did not expect them.

The victims then discovered that they could no longer come into contact with the alleged fraudsters or the consultancy firm.

Nigerian prince Osmond Eweka

Nigerian prince Osmond Eweka

Osmond Eweka accused of raising people without money

Osmond Eweka accused of raising people without money

Eweka is accused of swindling job seekers in New York from thousands of dollars by promising them high-paying jobs

According to authorities, Eweka and McKay have duped 250 people and pocketed more than $ 54,000. Prosecutors said they had never provided a single job. They executed the alleged scam from January to June 2018.

Eweka is a prince of the Benin royal family in Nigeria, according to reports, and an American citizen who lives in New Jersey. McKay comes from the Bronx.

Both men were charged with charges of theft and an arrangement to commit fraud. McKay was taken to court last week and released on bail of $ 200,000, the New York Times reported.

Eweka was in court on Thursday and did not plead the charges. He was released without bail.

In 2016 Eweka married lawyer Imade Igbinedion during an extensive wedding ceremony in Nigeria.

Representatives of the Benin family told the Times that they could not confirm whether Eweka was a family member because it is a very large family & # 39 ;.

Prosecutors said that Eweka (above) and a friend had paid job seekers compensation ranging from $ 300 to $ 700 with the promise to make them work. They have never given a customer a job

Prosecutors said that Eweka (above) and a friend had paid job seekers compensation ranging from $ 300 to $ 700 with the promise to make them work. They have never given a customer a job

Prosecutors said that Eweka (above) and a friend had paid job seekers compensation ranging from $ 300 to $ 700 with the promise to make them work. They have never given a customer a job

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