Nicola Sturgeon goes on two wheels as polls show her SNP is on track for another Holyrood majority

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Nicola Sturgeon put her skills to the test on an electric scooter today when she met members of the public ahead of next week’s crucial Scottish parliamentary election.

The SNP leader appeared cheerful as she took a ride on a Pure Electric scooter and spoke to locals in the town of Troon, South Ayrshire and Glasgow as she campaigned today with SNP candidate Siobhian Brown.

The scenes came as polls showed the prime minister was on track to win another majority in Thursday’s Holyrood election.

The latest predictions, however, come amid warnings from Tories that the SNP leader could drive Scotland’s economy ‘off the edge of a cliff’ after confirming on Sunday that she wanted to hold a new referendum on leaving the UK against 2023.

Nicola Sturgeon cheerfully appears as she tests her skills on an electric scooter in the town of Troon, in South Ayrshire, Scotland.

The Prime Minister is testing her skills on a pure electric scooter as she continues her campaign ahead of Thursday's Holyrood election.

The Prime Minister is testing her skills on a pure electric scooter as she continues her campaign ahead of Thursday’s Holyrood election.

Opinion polls show Scottish leader is on track to win another majority in Holyrood election

Opinion polls show Scottish leader is on track to win another majority in Holyrood election

In a poll for The Herald by BMG Research, which polled 1,023 Scots aged 16 or older between April 27 and 30, data showed Sturgeon’s party will win 68 seats, with research putting the SNP at 49 percent of the vote. . constituencies.

The figures also showed that the SNP is at 37 percent on the regional list, while the Tories are at 22 percent.

A second poll, conducted for the Sunday Times by Panelbase, revealed that the SNP was at 48 percent, the Tories 21 percent, Labor 20 percent, the Lib Dems 7 percent CNET and the Greens 3 percent in the constituencies.

Head of opinion polls at BMG told The HeraldThere is no doubt that the SNP will return next week as the largest party in Holyrood, but their prospects of a majority remain sharp.

With little movement since our last poll in mid-March, there is no real evidence that any party has amassed significant momentum before voters vote next week.

“Using a unified seat calculator – a general guide to estimating how votes could be converted to seats – our numbers suggest the SNP could win a narrow majority of seven, thanks to a near-clean voter turnout.”

The latest predictions, however, come when the Scottish Tories warned that the prime minister’s calls for a new vote on Scottish independence amid the coronavirus crisis could lead to austerity or tax hikes.

Scottish Tory leader Douglas Ross said The TelegraphIf she achieves a Holyrood majority, she will hold a damaging and divisive referendum while Scotland is still reeling from Covid’s impact.

‘This is more than irresponsible. If our Scottish Parliament were to be fully focused on reconstruction and recovery, Sturgeon will plunge us into chaos and uncertainty.

“She talks about driving – the problem is she wants to push our economy off the edge of a cliff.”

The Prime Minister speaks to the public in Troon ahead of the Scottish parliamentary elections

The Prime Minister speaks to the public in Troon ahead of the Scottish parliamentary elections

The SNP leader is running with SNP candidate for Ayrshire, Prestwick and Troon, Siobhian Brown

The SNP leader is running with SNP candidate for Ayrshire, Prestwick and Troon, Siobhian Brown

Mrs. Sturgeon takes a selfie with members of the public while campaigning in Glasgow, Scotland

Mrs. Sturgeon takes a selfie with members of the public while campaigning in Glasgow, Scotland

It comes after the SNP leader made it clear that she had no intention of putting her referendum drive on hold for the coronavirus recovery during a debate. on Channel 4 this week.

When asked why she had not provided an economic analysis of independence despite planning a new referendum, Ms. Sturgeon said she had postponed all preparations to allow her to focus on the coronavirus pandemic.

Host Krishnan Guru-Murthy said, ‘So postpone the referendum. If you’ve put everything on hold, why didn’t you say we’re putting the referendum on hold? ‘

Mrs. Sturgeon said, “I’m not planning a referendum right away. I said … we must have the right to choose.

‘Just like in 2014, very different from the Brexit referendum, we drew up a prospectus stating what independence meant, what the challenges would be. We will do that again. ‘

Earlier today, Sturgeon claimed she was the only candidate in the Scottish parliamentary election to offer serious leadership and put forward a serious plan to bring about recovery in the midst of the pandemic.

The Prime Minister of Scotland and leader of the Scottish National Party takes a stroll through the town of Troon in Scotland

The Prime Minister of Scotland and leader of the Scottish National Party takes a stroll through the town of Troon in Scotland

She told The BBC’s Sunday Show, “I am the only prime minister candidate who is not just talking about recovery in these elections, but who has put forward a serious plan to bring about that recovery.”

Ms. Sturgeon continues that the SNP is the ‘only party that actually does the job’.

She added: “ We’re not saying there aren’t major challenges in this country, but we’re the only party actually doing the work and putting forward plans to actually do it – and that’s the choice people have on Thursday.

“ Do you want to vote for parties vying for second place and say openly that they have no plan for government – or do you want a serious prime minister, an experienced prime minister, who leads a government that is serious about the challenges? ? ‘

This week, sources revealed that Boris Johnson could bring Nicola Sturgeon’s Scottish National Party (SNP) to the Supreme Court to stop a second Scottish referendum on independence, The Telegraph reported.

Legal advice dating back to 2011 suggests that the Scottish Parliament cannot proceed with the referendum without the approval of the UK Parliament.

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