Sir Nick Clegg, photographed on Wednesday, will join Facebook as a public relations executive after being recruited by Mark Zuckerberg to help him put pressure on the EU and the US. UU

Sir Nick Clegg, photographed on Wednesday, will join Facebook as a public relations executive after being recruited by Mark Zuckerberg to help him put pressure on the EU and the US. UU

Sir Nick Clegg, photographed on Wednesday, will join Facebook as a public relations executive after being recruited by Mark Zuckerberg to help him put pressure on the EU and the US. UU

Mark Zuckerberg paid Sir Nick Clegg more than £ 4 million a year after he was hired to head Facebook's global lobbying team after "months of courtship" by the founder of the social network.

The billionaire asked the former British deputy prime minister to take over the head of public relations, Elliot Schrage, who resigned in June after a series of damaging scandals.

Sir Nick, 51, agreed to a contract for which he could pay him more than 4 million pounds a year, including stock options, sources from Silicon Valley told MailOnline.

The giant payment package is not unusual for the "great technology" industry, but it dwarfs the salary of its recent parliamentarian of £ 77,379.

You will be paid to lobby in Europe and the USA. UU., Where Facebook faces investigations into tax issues and data breaches, including the Cambridge Analytica scandal, where application developers collected information from millions of accounts.

The recent problems of the social network erased billions of its stock price and the $ 58 billion of Zuckerberg himself [£50bn] fortune.

Nick Clegg with Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg from Facebook at a recent meeting

Nick Clegg with Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg from Facebook at a recent meeting

Nick Clegg with Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg from Facebook at a recent meeting

Earlier, Sir Nick was very critical of the company's miserable taxes and said the social media giant was clearly not paying "all the taxes they could" in Britain.

& # 39; I'm not especially dazzled by Facebook. In fact, I think the Californian messianic culture of Facebook is a bit irritating, "he said two years ago.

"I'm also not sure that companies like Facebook really pay all the taxes they could, although that's the fault of governments that have not yet managed to act together."

Facebook paid only £ 7.4 million in taxes in the United Kingdom last year despite having raised a record of £ 1.3 billion in British sales.

Vince Cable, the leader of the Liberal Democrats, said he would write a letter to Sir Nick: "I urge him to make sure Facebook cooperates with attempts to make sure they pay their fair share of taxes."

Tory deputy Nigel Evans said he "expected" Sir Nick to persuade the Facebook boss to pay UK corporation tax.

He said: "He can help you increase it to much higher levels, maybe you could dedicate a Facebook page about your actions and successes that you achieve for UK plc."

Sir Nick and his Spanish wife Miriam will head to Silicon Valley in the coming months with their three children

Sir Nick and his Spanish wife Miriam will head to Silicon Valley in the coming months with their three children

Sir Nick and his Spanish wife Miriam will head to Silicon Valley in the coming months with their three children

The former Democrat Liberal Democrat, who lost his seat in Sheffield Hallam to the Labor Party last year, will also end his personal campaign for a second EU referendum, in which he joined Tony Blair and Sir John Major, and He will fly throughout Europe and meet with his political leaders.

By posting a video online, he said he would help Facebook boss Mark Zuckerberg "navigate the future journey."

In a statement on his Facebook page, he said leaving before Brexit would be "a key," but the move was "a new and exciting adventure."

But people were quick to make fun of him in comments under the post, saying: "It seems that freedom of expression is doomed then."

It is said that Mark Zuckerberg persecuted the former parliamentarian for months while fighting against scandals in the United States and the European Union.

It is said that Mark Zuckerberg persecuted the former parliamentarian for months while fighting against scandals in the United States and the European Union.

It is said that Mark Zuckerberg persecuted the former parliamentarian for months while fighting against scandals in the United States and the European Union.

Sir Nick Clegg: former Deputy of Lib Dem accused of destroying his party

Sir Nick Clegg was knighted for service to politics this year, but more than 50,000 people signed a petition to reverse the honor, calling Clegg "a failed politician."

The father of three children, whose son Antonio recently fought against blood cancer, is married to Spanish lawyer Miriam González Durantez.

Last year he revealed that his son Antonio, one of the couple's three children, had been diagnosed with blood cancer.

The remaining bow was among a series of Lib Dems bathed with honors in recent years, with knighthoods for Vince Cable and Ed Davey, who lost their seats in 2015 after serving in the Cabinet.

Mr. Clegg argued but lost the Sheffield Hallam seat he held for 12 years in June 2017.

He has asked for a second referendum and has written a book called How to Stop Brexit.

In his book on Brexit, Mr. Clegg wrote: "There is nothing remotely inevitable about Brexit, except that it will be very harmful if it happens."

He said there should be a second vote because the people who voted for Leave were dying.

Mr. Clegg, the third of four brothers, joined the House of Commons in 2005 after years working in Brussels.

He assumed a position with the European Commission in 1994 and, five years later, was elected a Liberal Democrat in the European Parliament.

After changing Brussels for Westminster, he won the race to become the party leader in 2007 by defeating Chris Huhne after Menzies Campbell was persuaded to resign.

Three years later, he rode a wave of the call & # 39; Cleggmania & # 39; who briefly saw his party heading the polls during the 2010 election campaign.

Although the results did not coincide with this initial success, he became an agent of power during the coalition talks, and finally sided with the Conservatives and allowed David Cameron to enter the number 10.

In return, Clegg received the post of deputy prime minister and took the first liberal deputies to the government for decades. However, his party's poll ratings began to plummet after he was forced to give up a major promise not to increase tuition fees.

And he suffered the humiliation of losing a referendum on changing the voting system to a form of proportional representation.

After the electoral catastrophe of the party in 2015, Clegg resigned as leader and returned to the bases.

A year later, after the EU referendum, he became the party's Brexit spokesman, but then lost his seat.

Prior to his career in politics, the former deputy worked in Brussels as an MEP and the Facebook billionaire believes he can build bridges with the EU.

He will push the Eurocrats who are pushing for a new technology tax for next year and who are also promising more punitive fines for high-profile data breaches such as the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

Last week, Facebook unveiled new platform tools that it says will increase the transparency of political advertising as it faces research into the role of ads in elections around the world.

It also faces a potential fine of £ 1.2 billion for a data breach that allowed hackers to access the personal information of 30 million users last month.

The Irish Data Protection Commission (IDPC), Facebook's main supervisory authority in the EU, officially launched its investigation last week after the social media giant admitted that hackers could have accessed the sites. accounts of millions of users through a "vulnerability" on September 28.

In the United States, the company faces the next partial examinations in which it must fight against Russian interference and still faces an investigation in the Federal Trade Commission and the Security Exchange Commission.

Mr. Clegg can also help Mr. Zuckerberg speak in public after spending two uncomfortable days stuttering during Senate hearings this year.

Critics today criticized the ex-parliamentarian's new work as a "condemnatory accusation" of the revolving door between politics and big business.

Sir Nick is the most important politician in Europe who has worked for Facebook and in a statement on his Facebook page, he said he was expecting a "new exciting adventure".

He added that the firm and its applications, including WhatsApp and Instagram, were "at the heart of some of the most complex and difficult questions we face as a society", about individual privacy, democratic integrity, the balance between freedom of expression and the online ban. Artificial intelligence and the welfare of children.

He continued: "I believe that Facebook should continue to play a role in finding answers to these questions, not acting alone in Silicon Valley, but working with individuals, organizations, governments and regulators around the world to ensure that technology is a force for good

"I'm looking forward to being part of this effort."

Deputy Jon Trickett, shadow minister for workers in the cabinet office, said: "It is a condemnatory condemnation of the unfortunate state of our country's policy that, at a time when digital giants like Facebook are being scrutinized public, our former deputy prime minister has been hired to lobby on his behalf.

"The work is committed to slamming the revolving door between politics and big business, which has long corroded public confidence in politics."

Sir Nick published a long statement explaining why he was moving to Facebook and the "key" to abandon the second referendum campaign.

Sir Nick published a long statement explaining why he was moving to Facebook and the "key" to abandon the second referendum campaign.

Sir Nick published a long statement explaining why he was moving to Facebook and the "key" to abandon the second referendum campaign.

The people of Facebook mocked his publication and said: "it seems that freedom of expression is doomed."

The people of Facebook mocked his publication and said: "it seems that freedom of expression is doomed."

The people of Facebook mocked his publication and said: "it seems that freedom of expression is doomed."

Nick Clegg answers the questions of the prime minister in the House of Commons in November 2010, replacing David Cameron after forming a coalition government earlier that year.

Nick Clegg answers the questions of the prime minister in the House of Commons in November 2010, replacing David Cameron after forming a coalition government earlier that year.

Nick Clegg answers the questions of the prime minister in the House of Commons in November 2010, replacing David Cameron after forming a coalition government earlier that year.

He will start working for Facebook's global communications and affairs team in London in the coming weeks, after Zuckerberg sought him out to help him with his sick reputation.

Facebook has been shaken by scandal after scandal and Mark Zuckerberk is looking for help from Nick Clegg

Facebook has been shaken by scandal after scandal and Mark Zuckerberk is looking for help from Nick Clegg

Facebook has been shaken by scandal after scandal and Mark Zuckerberk is looking for help from Nick Clegg

Sir Nick, his Spanish wife Miriam, a partner in the Dechert law firm, and their children will move to California.

British public relations expert Rachel Whetstone, one of the people who is said to be competing for Sir Nick's new job, recently moved to Netflix from Facebook.

The social network has been shaken by recent data scandals in which millions of accounts were compromised.

Mark Zuckerberg had to give many humble apologies this year and it is understood that he personally persecuted Sir Nick for the work.

So far he has been campaigning for a second referendum and has written a book called How to Stop Brexit.

In his book, he said there should be a second vote because the people who voted for Leave were dying.

Mr. Clegg also joined former Prime Minister Tony Blair and Sir John Major in their "shuttle diplomacy" across the continent, arguing that British policy had made it "viable" to stop the United Kingdom,

But by going to Facebook, some have suggested that he may believe that the outcome of the referendum can not be reversed as he wished.

Lord Allan of Hallam, who was Clegg's predecessor as Sheffield Hallam MP, is the policy director on Facebook.

The company is already facing difficult questions about its treatment of customers.

Mr. Zuckerberg, one of the richest and most powerful men in the world, has faced a lot of criticism about Facebook's privacy policies.

The former Mp will be working at the Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, California, starting the new year.

The former Mp will be working at the Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, California, starting the new year.

The former Mp will be working at the Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, California, starting the new year.

Under his direction, Facebook has been accused of allowing Russians to interfere in US elections and spread "false news".

Get out of Britain before Brexit is an 'English wrench', but I'm excited about Facebook, says Nick Clegg

Here is Nick Clegg's statement in its entirety:

I'm happy to join Facebook. After almost twenty years in European and British politics, this is an exciting new adventure for me.

After having spoken extensively with Mark and Sheryl over the past few months, I was impressed by their recognition that the company is on a journey that brings new responsibilities not only to users of Facebook applications but to society in general. I hope to play a role to help navigate that trip.

Facebook, WhatsApp, Messenger, Oculus and Instagram are at the heart of many people's daily lives, but also at the heart of some of the most complex and difficult questions we face as a society: the privacy of the individual; the integrity of our democratic process; the tensions between local cultures and the global internet; the balance between freedom of expression and prohibited content; the power and concerns around artificial intelligence; and the welfare of our children.

I believe that Facebook should continue to play a role in finding answers to those questions, not acting alone in Silicon Valley, but working with individuals, organizations, governments and regulators around the world to ensure that technology is a force for good.

I look forward to being part of this effort. Throughout my public life, I have enjoyed dealing with difficult and controversial problems and seeking to communicate them to others. I hope to use some of those skills in my new role.

As someone who has spent his whole life arguing over Britain's unconditional commitment to Europe, of course it is a key to leave the public debate at a crucial moment in the Brexit process. But the key decisions will soon pass to the Parliament, of which I am no longer a member, and once I decided to face this new and unique challenge on Facebook, I felt it was better to get going sooner rather than later.

Miriam and I are very grateful for the warm welcome that all of us at Menlo Park have given us. Moving to California is a new beginning for us, and for our three children, which we look forward to with great enthusiasm and anticipation.

Earlier this year, it became known that the personal information of 87 million Facebook users had been compiled by Cambridge Analytica, a data company that used the information to help Donald Trump win the presidency of the United States.

Mr. Zuckerberg was dragged before Congress to declare his privacy policies in April.

Uncomfortable and, at times, evasive, the only time the love of Silicon Valley spent two days stuttering during the hearings.

He was ridiculed online for everything from his wet appearance to his ill-fitting suit, and even surprised him by using a booster seat to look taller than his 5 feet 7 inches.

The UK information commissioner's office has said it intends to fine Facebook around £ 500,000 for what happened: the maximum fine.

A Congressional investigation found that agents from Russia and other countries had been posting fake political advertisements on Facebook since at least 2016.

Last month, the social media giant admitted that a security flaw in its systems had allowed criminals to effectively enter and take control of millions of other profiles.

The hack gave cyber attackers access to a large amount of personal data, including people's addresses, email accounts and even bank details.

They may also have had access to intimate family photographs, along with details of the personal life, friends and hobbies of the users. All this information could be a gold mine for scammers. It is one of the largest cyber-hacks ever registered.

A group of the main investors of Facebook has even asked that Mr. Zuckerberg be dismissed as president after the business went from one crisis to another.

The reaction comes after the billionaire founder of the technology giant, who is also executive director, has been rejected by a series of security and privacy scandals that have subjected the company to intense public scrutiny over the use of technology. user data.

Those who support the proposal to eliminate Zuckerberg and make the role of president an independent position, include the New York City pension fund and Trillium Asset Management.

Scott Stringer, manager of the New York fund of £ 122 billion, said: "An independent president is essential to get out of this mess."

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