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NHS boss reveals that the number of patients for Covid-19 has dropped by 10,000 in just a few weeks

Hospital admissions for coronavirus have halved since the pandemic peak, NHS chief reveals today.

Simon Stevens, who writes exclusively in the Daily Mail, says the falling demand means that the sick shouldn’t wait to seek help for other illnesses.

Hospital staff in England treat just over 9,000 patients a day – less than 19,000 a few weeks ago. The number of admissions is now falling by about 2,000 a week.

Sir Simon says we are ‘not out of the woods yet’, but hard work, careful preparation and public action have ensured that the NHS has not been overwhelmed by the greatest challenge in its 71-year history.

He says “we want the NHS to return to normal work” and that people suffering from non-Covid disease should seek help and “not wait.”

However, he warns of drunken and disorderly behavior, saying that A&E alcohol poisoning admissions have declined during the crisis – and no one wants to see them come back.

In other developments in today’s coronavirus crisis:

  • Liverpool became the first English city to refuse to send children back to school next month as the government began to argue over its plan to resume classes;
  • Sadiq Khan has been accused of risking lives and forcing people to the subway where social distance is “impossible” due to a lack of trains after he returned Monday’s traffic jam in central London;
  • At the beginning of this week, only 1,500 coronavirus contact tracers had been appointed, a minister admitted, despite the government’s promise to recruit 18,000 in mid-May;
  • Number 10 admitted that lockdowns can be simplified by region, based on promising data suggesting that only 24 people a day are affected by London’s corona virus;
  • Africa will escape the massive death toll from COVID-19 because its population is young and fit – but one in five people on the continent will still contract the corona virus, the World Health Organization predicted;
  • The hope that a course of coronavirus could be on the horizon was raised after an experimental prick from Oxford University showed promising signs in monkey studies;
  • Coronavirus has plunged Germany into a recession, with the country experiencing the strongest quarterly contraction in over a decade, official data showed.

Hospital staff treat just over 9,000 patients a day in England - less than 19,000 a few weeks ago according to official figures. The number of admissions is now falling by about 2,000 a week. Pictured: paramedics take a patient to St Thomas' Hospital, London

Hospital staff treat just over 9,000 patients a day in England – down from 19,000 a few weeks ago according to official figures. The number of admissions is now falling by about 2,000 a week. Pictured: paramedics take a patient to St Thomas’ Hospital, London

Sir Simon Stevens has issued a warning for drunken and disorderly behavior, saying that A&E alcohol intoxication rates fell during the crisis ¿and no one wants to see them return

Sir Simon Stevens has issued a warning for drunken and disorderly behavior, saying that A&E alcohol intoxication rates fell during the crisis ¿and no one wants to see them return

Sir Simon Stevens has issued a warning for drunk and disorderly behavior, saying that A&E alcohol poisoning admissions fell during the crisis – and no one wants to see them return

The virus death toll rose 384 to 33,998 yesterday. But health secretary Matt Hancock said the death toll “declined in all circumstances every day.” He said the UK was past its peak and two thirds of nursing homes are not reporting any cases now.

Figures in the hospital with Covid-19 are 13 percent lower than this time last week, he added. Experts agree that the number of fatalities has clearly decreased compared to 626 daily deaths a week ago and 1,152 five weeks ago.

The trend is encouraging for plans for a phased return to school after the summer half-term, although Mr. Hancock acknowledged that it will be “an incredible challenge.”

And there was less encouraging news yesterday about the so-called R-Rate, which tracks the rate of further infection of the virus.

This ‘R number’ – the average number of people infected by someone with the virus – has risen to 0.7 to 1.0 in the past week. Anything above 1.0 threatens a new wave of cases.

Doctors have warned that heavy drinking “ paralyzes ” the NHS, with nearly 1.3 million patients hospitalized due to alcohol in England in 2018/19.

Mr. Stevens says the public should take the opportunity to reflect on how this could be maintained as a positive legacy of lockdown. “When pubs and clubs reopen, no one wants to go back to drunken and disorderly behavior that increases numbers in busy A & Es,” he adds.

“We all owe it to those who have given so much in the fight against Covid-19 to ensure that we build an even better, stronger and more agile NHS for the future.”

And with other illnesses, he adds, “If you need help, don’t wait any longer. Please help us to help you. Whether you are a concerned parent of a sick child, or you or a loved one have symptoms of a heart attack or stroke. ‘

He promises that the NHS will “move heaven and earth” to restart vital services for patients in need of support. Routine operations are resumed, but patients and families are asked to isolate for 14 days first.

SAGE reveals feared R0 infection rate is rising again to almost one – on the same day, officials announced the lowest weekly death rate since late March with an additional 384 victims

ThroughSam Blanchard Senior Health Reporter for Mailonlineand Connor Boyd Health Reporter for Mailonline

Britain’s crucial reproduction rate on the coronavirus has crept to the point where the outbreak could get out of hand, government scientists warned – on the same day, officials announced the lowest weekly death toll since late March, with only 384 more victims.

Experts on the number 10 SAGE panel say the reproduction rate – known as the R – has risen to somewhere between 0.7 and 1 after officials claimed it was between 0.5 and 0.9 last week.

Officials must keep the number below 1 – meaning each patient infects another person – or the outbreak will start to grow again.

However, the latest data is out of date for three weeks due to a delay in the government’s mathematical models. The new number does not take into account the slight easing of UK closing measures, which Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced on Sunday.

The virus is still believed to spread more quickly in nursing homes than in the general community, and the spike in deaths from COVID-19 appears to have peaked later than in hospitals, suggesting they will continue longer.

The R is calculated by calculating how quickly the virus spreads by comparing data such as hospital admissions, the number of patients in intensive care, death statistics and surveys to find out how many people the public comes into contact with.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said in today’s Downing Street briefing, ‘We are constantly monitoring the R and it’s one of our five tests … we don’t think it’s above 1, we think it’s within a range so it still passes that test. ‘

He said the R was an “incredibly important data point,” but it wasn’t the only thing politicians considered because they facilitate the shutdown. He said a change in the range was “important to look at,” but officials did not reconsider their decision to ease the lockdown. Dr Jenny Harries, deputy chief physician, added that the real goal was to reduce the number of cases, and the R was one of many ways to detect this.

People are depicted practicing in Battersea Park, London, as the government now allows members of the public to exercise outdoors as often and for as long as they want

People are depicted practicing in Battersea Park, London, as the government now allows members of the public to exercise outdoors as often and for as long as they want

People are depicted practicing in Battersea Park, London, as the government now allows members of the public to exercise outdoors as often and for as long as they want

Groups of people with a social distance are enjoying their renewed freedoms near Tower Bridge, London, after Prime Minister Boris Johnson eased the lockout rules this week

Groups of people with a social distance are enjoying their renewed freedoms near Tower Bridge, London, after Prime Minister Boris Johnson eased the lockout rules this week

Groups of people with a social distance are enjoying their renewed freedoms near Tower Bridge, London, after Prime Minister Boris Johnson eased the lockout rules this week

Greg Clark MP, chairman of a parliamentary science committee, said officials should not focus too much on the R and look at the wider picture. He said, “It is unclear how the R rate in nursing homes is relevant to the R rate for people who do their daily activities,” adding that the government figure was clearly skewed by faster transfers in hospitals and nursing homes.

Official Department of Health statistics released today show that 33,998 people have died since the outbreak, meaning today’s number is the lowest seven-day total (2,757) since the week ending Friday, March 27. But other grim forecasts estimate that the actual toll may be higher than 50,000.

It’s because data from the University of Cambridge and Public Health England suggest that about 12 percent of all people in England – 6.6 million – have already had the virus.

It has also been estimated that only 24 people contract the life-threatening disease in London every day, but government scientists would be skeptical that the number of new infections is so low.

WHAT IS THE R AND HOW DOES THE GOVERNMENT ESTIMATE?

Each infectious disease is given a reproduction number, known as R0 – pronounced ‘R nothing’ – or simply R.

It is a value that indicates how many people will infect one sick person on average if the virus reproduces in ideal conditions.

The value has been estimated by the Government’s Scientific Emergency Group (SAGE).

They assess data from hospital admissions, intensive care demand, deaths and the number of social contacts people have.

Experts use multiple sources to get this information, including NHS hospitalizations, Office for National Statistics and CQC mortality rates and behavioral contacts.

Using mathematical models, they can calculate the spread of the virus.

But a delay in the time it takes for coronavirus patients to become unwell and die means that R modeling is always about three weeks behind.

Most epidemiologists – scientists who track disease outbreaks – believe that the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19, has an R-value of about 3.

But some experts analyzing outbreaks around the world estimate that it could be closer to the 6.6 figure.

As an outbreak continues, the R0 can be more accurately referred to as Re or just R, as other factors play a role in influencing how well it can spread.

COVID-19 R estimates vary because the true extent of the pandemic remains a mystery and how quickly the virus spreads depends on the environment.

As progress in an outbreak, the R can simply be called R, which means the effective degree of infection – nothing works on the premise that no one in the population is protected, becoming obsolete as more people recover.

Individual statistics published today by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) showed that the coronavirus – which some scientists believe has been spreading in Britain since January – killed more people than cancer, dementia and heart disease combined in April , which resulted in the deaths of 27,764 people.

The government’s Scientific Pandemic Influenza Group on Modeling (SPI-M) has decided this week that it thinks the R is between 0.7 and 1, including looking at hospitalization and mortality rates.

An R number of 1 means that on average each infected person infects 1 other person, which means that the total number of new infections is stable. If it is higher, the virus spreads faster and, if it is lower, the outbreak shrinks.

SAGE is convinced that the number of infections is not increasing and is very likely to decrease.

Sir Patrick Vallance, chief scientific advisor to the government, said, “R is one of the important things you can follow to understand an epidemic. If you can estimate R, then you have part of a reliable tool for planning how to fight the virus.

If the R is higher than one, it means that this disease is growing exponentially and will continue to spread to more and more people. In order to keep R under one and control the virus, it is vital that people stay alert and follow the latest government guidelines to the letter. We will update this estimate regularly in the coming weeks. ‘

NHS England announced today that 186 people have died in the hospital with the coronavirus, including a 15-year-old.

The 15-year-old has since the outbreak become the 13th person to have died in an NHS hospital under the age of 20.

The oldest patient in today’s statistics was 99 years old, and 10 of them, between 30 and 94 years old, were healthy before the virus was diagnosed.

All patients confirmed today had died since April 10.

Scotland reported that 46 more people had died in its hospitals, along with 15 in Northern Ireland and nine in Wales.

Nearly 230,000 people have been officially diagnosed with the viral disease, but the true magnitude of the British outbreak is significantly larger, and government officials suggest up to 6.6 million people probably contracted it in England alone.

An analysis by Cambridge University and Public Health England (PHE) suggested that the disease could be eradicated from the current transmission rate in the capital within weeks.

And their data – which has been entered into the # 10 scientific panel, SAGE – is estimated to up to 20 percent of Londoners already infected. The rate across England is estimated to be around 12 percent.

But the same data also showed the crucial R rate – the average number of people to whom an infected patient transmits the virus – in London, as well as any other region that had fallen before March 23.

People are now allowed to spend as much time outdoors as they want, but must be at least 2 meters (6’6 “) away from anyone they don’t live with (Image: dog walkers in Clapham, South London, today)

An analysis by Cambridge University and Public Health England (PHE) suggested that the disease could be eradicated in the capital at the current rate of transmission within weeks (photo: people at Potters Field near Tower Bridge today)

An analysis by Cambridge University and Public Health England (PHE) suggested that the disease could be eradicated in the capital at the current rate of transmission within weeks (photo: people at Potters Field near Tower Bridge today)

An analysis by Cambridge University and Public Health England (PHE) suggested that the disease could be eradicated in the capital at the current rate of transmission within weeks (photo: people at Potters Field near Tower Bridge today)

It suggested that the government’s social distance measures introduced a week earlier, with public transport use plummeting and millions of Britons working from home rather than at risk, slowed the crisis.

The Cambridge-PHE data prompted some MPs to urge the government to commit to lifting the lock by region, and one urged ministers to consider this because ‘from a health perspective makes sense ‘.

The Cambridge team estimated that 1.8 million people in London (20 percent) have already had coronavirus.

They claimed that 10 to 53 people in the capital contracted the virus on May 10, the day Boris Johnson announced a slight relaxation of some lockout rules. The forecast also predicted that it would have dropped below 10 today, but that did not take into account the relaxation.

At the height of the capital’s crisis – expected to be the same day the closure was announced – 213,000 would have contracted the infection.

Data show that the spread of COVID-19 in London was severely hampered before the blockade was implemented, and suggested that social distance measures were introduced the week before, with millions of Londoners avoiding public transport and choosing to work from home. This graph shows the number of daily deaths registered in NHS hospitals in London (red bars) compared to the estimated R rate (blue line)

Data show that the spread of COVID-19 in London was severely hampered before the blockade was implemented, and suggested that social distance measures were introduced the week before, with millions of Londoners avoiding public transport and choosing to work from home. This graph shows the number of daily deaths registered in NHS hospitals in London (red bars) compared to the estimated R rate (blue line)

Data show that the spread of COVID-19 in London was severely hampered before the blockade was implemented, and suggested that social distance measures were introduced the week before, with millions of Londoners avoiding public transport and choosing to work from home. This graph shows the number of daily deaths registered in NHS hospitals in London (red bars) compared to the estimated R rate (blue line)

At the height of the capital's crisis - expected to be announced the same day as the closure - 213,000 people are believed to have contracted the infection (Photo: Londoners soaking up the sun in Clapham Common Park this afternoon)

At the height of the capital's crisis - expected to be announced the same day as the closure - 213,000 people are believed to have contracted the infection (Photo: Londoners soaking up the sun in Clapham Common Park this afternoon)

At the height of the capital’s crisis – expected to be announced the same day as the closure – 213,000 people are believed to have contracted the infection (Photo: Londoners soaking up the sun in Clapham Common Park this afternoon)

At the start of the outbreak, London was the hardest hit part of the UK, but the latest figures suggest it is now ahead of any other area of ​​recovery (photo: people walking on Potters Field near Tower Bridge today)

At the start of the outbreak, London was the hardest hit part of the UK, but the latest figures suggest it is now ahead of any other area of ​​recovery (photo: people walking on Potters Field near Tower Bridge today)

At the start of the outbreak, London was the hardest hit part of the UK, but the latest figures suggest it is now ahead of any other area of ​​recovery (photo: people walking on Potters Field near Tower Bridge today)

The data also broken down the 'attack rate' - the number of people infected in total - for each of England's regions, saying that about 12 percent of England had contracted the virus in total. They say London has been the worst-hit region: About 20 percent of the capital has contracted the disease since Britain's outbreak got out of hand, followed by the Northwest (14 percent). In the Midlands and the Northeast and Yorkshire, the percentage is estimated at 11 percent. While the team says about one in ten people in the east of England have already had COVID-19. The rate is only 8 percent in the southeast and even lower (5 percent) in the southwest

The data also broken down the 'attack rate' - the number of people infected in total - for each of England's regions, saying that about 12 percent of England had contracted the virus in total. They say London has been the worst-hit region: About 20 percent of the capital has contracted the disease since Britain's outbreak got out of hand, followed by the Northwest (14 percent). In the Midlands and the Northeast and Yorkshire, the percentage is estimated at 11 percent. While the team says about one in ten people in the east of England have already had COVID-19. The rate is only 8 percent in the southeast and even lower (5 percent) in the southwest

The data also broken down the ‘attack rate’ – the number of people infected in total – for each of England’s regions, saying that about 12 percent of England had contracted the virus in total. They say London has been the worst-hit region: About 20 percent of the capital has contracted the disease since Britain’s outbreak got out of hand, followed by the Northwest (14 percent). In the Midlands and the Northeast and Yorkshire, the percentage is estimated at 11 percent. While the team says about one in ten people in the east of England have already had COVID-19. The rate is only 8 percent in the southeast and even lower (5 percent) in the southwest

It calculated that the crucial reproduction rate of the ‘R’ has dropped to just 0.4 in the capital, halving the number of new cases every 3.5 days.

LOCKDOWN ‘CAN BE EASY REGIONALLY’ IF DATA COMMUNICATES 24 PEOPLE A DAY VIRUS IN LONDON

Lockdowns could be eased regionally, number 10 admitted today based on promising data suggesting that only 24 people a day are affected by London’s corona virus.

The Downing Street official spokesperson revealed that some of the government’s strict measures to curb the spread of COVID-19 could be alleviated “at different rates in different parts of the country.”

It comes after an analysis conducted by experts from Cambridge University and Public Health England (PHE) suggested that the disease could be eradicated from the current transmission rate in the capital within weeks.

And the data – entered in SAGE’s # 10 scientific panel – is estimated to up to 20 percent of Londoners already infected. The rate across England is estimated to be around 12 percent.

But the same data also showed the crucial R rate – the average number of people to whom an infected patient transmits the virus – in London, as well as any other region that had fallen before March 23.

It suggested that the government’s social distance measures introduced a week earlier, with public transport use plummeting and millions of Britons working from home rather than at risk, slowed the crisis.

The Cambridge-PHE data prompted some MPs to urge the government to commit to lifting the lock by region, and one urged ministers to consider this because ‘from a health perspective makes sense ‘.

Commenting on the speculation, the official spokesperson for number 10 said: ‘The roadmap we prepared speaks about how we will respond to local infection rates and the other available data and that this could lead to some of the measures are relaxed at different rates in different parts of the country and may at the same time lead to some measures being re-imposed in different parts of the country, but not in others. ‘

Leading scientists described the study – based on death data from PHE, NHS England and regional health officials – as ‘robust’, but admitted that projections for the future are likely to increase dramatically because the current model does not take into account the government’s decision to slightly relieve last Sunday’s lock.

One epidemiologist argued that it was ‘extremely unlikely’ that the number of new cases in London – the worst-hit part of England – had fallen to 24, and another called for transparent handling of the data as it was ‘not clear’ from the available documents how the group came to their estimates.

Downing Street was told today to drop its ‘we-know-best attitude’ and publish more secret evidence supporting its coronavirus response, with the data released by Cambridge and not PHE.

Number 10 has been repeatedly criticized in the course of the COVID-19 outbreak for an apparent reluctance to release the scientific evidence provided by its experts. Conservative MPs today wondered what other essential information was kept secret because they asked for a different approach.

Meanwhile, the team’s modeling shows that there is only one death in every 160 cases, giving it an infection death rate of about 0.63 percent. This suggests at the current rate, the daily death toll in London would have dropped to a constant level of zero within three weeks.

Three weeks is how long it can take for a COVID-19 patient to be diagnosed, their condition to be fatal, and their death to be recorded.

At the beginning of the outbreak, London was the hardest-hit part of the UK, but the latest figures now put it ahead of any other area in terms of recovery. In contrast, the North East England records 4,000 daily infections and has an R rate of 0.8, twice the number of the capital.

The data – given to the Scientific Pandemic Influenza modeling subgroup – suggested that COVID-19 kills about 0.63 percent of people it infects – a similar figure to other estimates from around the world, making it about six times more deadly are then seasonal flu. But they admitted it could be as low as 0.49 or even 0.81 percent.

The Cambridge-PHE study showed tremendous variation between different age groups, warning that the virus has an infection mortality rate of about 16 percent for those over 75, but it’s less than 0.018 percent for anyone under 44 – the equivalent of one death for every 10,000 cases.

For people between the ages of 45 and 64, the team said the death rate was around 0.28 percent, while the rate was around 1.8 percent for people between the ages of 65 and 74.

The data also broken down the ‘attack rate’ – the number of people infected in total – for each of the regions in England, an estimated approximately 12 percent of England had contracted the virus in total.

They say London has been the worst-hit region: About 20 percent of the capital has contracted the disease since Britain’s outbreak got out of hand, followed by the Northwest (14 percent).

In the Midlands and the Northeast and Yorkshire, the percentage is estimated at 11 percent. While the team says about one in ten people in the east of England have already had COVID-19. The rate is only 8 percent in the southeast and even lower (5 percent) in the southwest.

The report also addressed the crucial R percentage of each region. It is vital that the number – believed to have been between 3.5 and 4 at the start of the crisis – remains below one, or the outbreak will quickly spiral again as people around them more quickly infect.

Other data published yesterday by the Office for National Statistics saw officials estimate that currently around 148,000 people have the corona virus in Britain.

De eerste ronde van willekeurige openbare tests identificeerde slechts 33 positieve gevallen van COVID-19 van een steekproef van 10.705 mensen en schatte een nationaal besmettingsniveau van 0,27 procent – één op de 370 mensen.

Professor Jonathan Van-Tam, adjunct-hoofdarts van Engeland, zei gisteren tijdens de Downing Street-briefing dat de gegevens ‘in feite een vrij laag niveau van infectie’ in de gemeenschap vertegenwoordigden.

Dit suggereert dat 148.000 mensen op enig moment tussen 27 april en 10 mei het virus hadden, dat cijfer is de middelste schatting tussen een dieptepunt van 94.000 en een hoogtepunt van 222.000. Gedurende die tijd werden 66.343 mensen officieel gediagnosticeerd.

Het coronavirus infecteert mensen twee keer zo snel in het noordoosten van Engeland dan in Londen, realtime volgen van de reproductieve 'R'-beoordelingen

Het coronavirus infecteert mensen twee keer zo snel in het noordoosten van Engeland dan in Londen, realtime volgen van de reproductieve 'R'-beoordelingen

Het coronavirus infecteert mensen twee keer zo snel in het noordoosten van Engeland dan in Londen, realtime volgen van de reproductieve ‘R’-beoordelingen

VACCINEN HOOP ALS PROEF SUCCES IN AAPEN TOONT

De hoop dat een coronaviruskuur aan de horizon zou kunnen zijn, werd vandaag opgeworpen nadat een in Groot-Brittannië ontwikkeld vaccin veelbelovende tekenen vertoonde in proeven met apen.

De experimentele prik van de Universiteit van Oxford versterkte het immuunsysteem in zes resusapen zonder bijwerkingen te veroorzaken.

Binnen 28 dagen na vaccinatie hadden alle dieren COVID-19-antilichamen – geproduceerd door het lichaam om het enige immuniteit tegen het virus te geven.

Onderzoekers zeiden dat de primaten het virus konden bestrijden voordat het diep in hun longen doordrong, waar het dodelijk kan worden.

De veelbelovende resultaten komen omdat menselijke proeven met het Oxford University-vaccin al aan de gang zijn, met resultaten die over een maand worden verwacht.

Wetenschappers die op de studie reageren, hebben de bevindingen beschreven als ‘zeer bemoedigend’, maar waarschuwen dat dit niet dezelfde resultaten bij mensen garandeert.

Ze ontdekten dat een enkele vaccinatiedosis ook effectief was in het voorkomen van schade aan de longen in het onderzoek bij apen en muizen.

Sommige dieren vertoonden binnen twee weken antilichamen tegen het virus, maar ze hadden allemaal de virusbestrijdende moleculen binnen 28 dagen.

De onderzoekers ontdekten dat de virale belasting in het onderste ademhalingssysteem aanzienlijk was verminderd bij de dieren die het vaccin kregen.

De gegevens beslaan slechts een periode van twee weken, ongeacht hoeveel mensen het virus mogelijk hebben gehad en zijn hersteld sinds de uitbraak is begonnen.

Het bleek dat het besmettingspercentage zes keer hoger is bij gezondheidswerkers en verzorgers dan bij de algemene bevolking, zo bleek uit het onderzoek.

Terwijl 1,33 procent van de mensen die in patiëntgerichte functies in ziekenhuizen of huizen werkten, positief testten op het virus, deed slechts 0,22 procent van de mensen met een andere baan dat.

De aangekondigde cijfers omvatten niet iedereen die werd getest in een verpleeghuis of een ziekenhuis, waar volgens de statistici ‘de kans op een COVID-19-infectie waarschijnlijk hoger is’.

De meeste officiële tests, die in totaal 233.151 positieve gevallen tijdens de hele uitbraak hebben opgepikt, worden uitgevoerd in ziekenhuizen en verzorgingshuizen.

ONS-gegevens zullen binnenkort antilichaamgegevens publiceren die laten zien hoeveel mensen de infectie al hebben gehad, maar beschikken momenteel niet over voldoende gegevens voor een betrouwbare schatting.

De huidige enquête, waarvan dit de eerste reeks gegevens is, zal worden voortgezet als onderdeel van het ‘test, track and trace’-plan van de regering om de blokkering op te heffen en zal worden uitgebreid tot regelmatige tests in meer dan 10.000 huishoudens.

How deadly the virus really is remains unknown, but it kills huge numbers of people with other health problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure and dementia.

Data from the Office for National Statistics today revealed that COVID-19 has become the leading cause of death in England and Wales, causing people to die nearly three times as often from dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

In England, 587 out of every 100,000 people were killed in April, compared to 209 per 100,000 for dementia and 85 for heart disease.

The virus, which causes pneumonia, has killed more people in just two months than long-term lung diseases in all of 2018, the US said.

US data shows that between March 1 and April 30, 33,841 people died with the coronavirus in England and Wales.

Of those patients, 95 percent (32,143) were killed directly by the virus, which was equivalent to the total number of deaths from long-term lung disease – such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) – in the whole of 2018.

In a normal year, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease are the leading causes of death in England and Wales, accounting for about one in seven fatalities (12.8 percent).

Het Office for National Statistics onthulde vandaag dat COVID-19 in april met een aanzienlijke marge de belangrijkste doodsoorzaak was in Engeland en Wales - het doodde mensen met bijna driemaal de snelheid van dementie en de ziekte van Alzheimer

Het Office for National Statistics onthulde vandaag dat COVID-19 in april met een aanzienlijke marge de belangrijkste doodsoorzaak was in Engeland en Wales - het doodde mensen met bijna driemaal de snelheid van dementie en de ziekte van Alzheimer

Het Office for National Statistics onthulde vandaag dat COVID-19 in april met een aanzienlijke marge de belangrijkste doodsoorzaak was in Engeland en Wales – het doodde mensen met bijna driemaal de snelheid van dementie en de ziekte van Alzheimer

Dementia killed 69,748 people in 2018, according to previous statistics from the ONS, and COVID-19 killed nearly half the number of people in just two months.

One in five COVID-19 victims in March and April (6,887) also had dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, demonstrating how the virus is most devastating to the elderly and vulnerable.

Dit is het meest merkbaar in de verzorgingshuizen van het land, die zorgen voor ongeveer 400.000 mensen, van wie ongeveer driekwart met dementie.

Meer dan een kwart van de mensen die sinds begin maart in verzorgingshuizen zijn gestorven – 12.526 van de 45.899 – is in verband gebracht met het coronavirus.

Zelfs het aantal mensen dat sterft zonder het virus is gestegen als gevolg van de pandemie, blijkt uit de ONS-cijfers.

Zo is het aantal ‘overige sterfgevallen exclusief COVID-19’ in zorginstellingen meer dan verdubbeld op 11 april tot 807 van 375 op dezelfde dag vorig jaar, met 437 sterfgevallen als gevolg van coronavirus.

Sally Warren, beleidsdirecteur van de gezondheidsdenktank van The King’s Fund, zei: ‘De gegevens geven een indicatie van de grimmige tol die de pandemie heeft geëist van mensen die in verzorgingshuizen wonen, waaruit blijkt dat het totale aantal doden onder zorginstellingen met 46 procent is toegenomen. inwoners in Engeland en Wales vergeleken met dezelfde periode vorig jaar.

‘Hoewel we nog niet alle factoren die een rol spelen volledig kunnen begrijpen, is dit nog een andere zorgwekkende bevinding die onze aandacht stevig op de crisis in onze verzorgingshuizen moet houden.’

Het virus lijkt het overlijdensrisico voor mensen met dementie en de ziekte van Alzheimer bijna te hebben verdubbeld.

Het ONS-rapport zei: ‘Vergeleken met het vijfjarig gemiddelde was het sterftecijfer als gevolg van dementie en de ziekte van Alzheimer aanzienlijk hoger in april 2020, met 208,9 sterfgevallen per 100.000 personen vergeleken met 113,8 sterfgevallen per 100.000 personen voor het vijfjarig gemiddelde . ‘

Fiona Carragher, onderzoeksdirecteur van de Alzheimer’s Society, zei: ‘Dit zijn gruwelijke cijfers voor iedereen met een geliefde met dementie en laten voor het eerst de ware tol van het coronavirus zien.

‘Dementie is nu de belangrijkste onderliggende voorwaarde voor sterfgevallen door COVID-19, goed voor één op de vijf van de totale sterfgevallen.

‘En naast COVID-19 sterven mensen bijna twee keer zo vaak aan dementie als normaal.

‘Vanaf het begin was de actie om de uitdaging aan te gaan te traag – en uit ons onderzoek van deze week blijkt dat veel zorginstellingen het nog steeds moeilijk hebben, waarbij meer dan 40 procent nog steeds geen vertrouwen heeft in hun PBM-aanbod.

‘We hebben een dringend plan van de overheid nodig om de veiligheid en ondersteuning in verzorgingshuizen te garanderen, en ministers moeten nu kijken naar langdurige steun voor thuiswonende dementie en het isolement van vrienden en familie aanpakken.’ Mensen met dementie sterven in ongekende mate cijfers, de regering moet nu ingrijpen om verdere tragedie te voorkomen. ‘

Laten we niet teruggaan naar A & Es opgevuld door dronken als de pubs opengaan, schrijft NHS Chief Executive SIMON STEVENS

De coronavirus pandemie heeft de NHS en haar medewerkers getest op een manier die nog niet eerder is vertoond in haar 71-jarige geschiedenis. Op het hoogtepunt van deze uitbraak behandelden ziekenhuizen in Engeland ongeveer 19.000 patiënten per dag met Covid-19, een virus dat een paar maanden geleden onbekend was.

Dat is met tot 2.000 patiënten per week gedaald en bedraagt ​​nu iets meer dan 9.000. Maar we zijn niet uit het bos en hebben een moeilijk pad voor de boeg. Voortdurende waakzaamheid is van cruciaal belang.

De NHS is tot dusver echter de uitdaging aangegaan. Thanks to hard work and careful preparation and the public’s own action we did not see the health service overwhelmed as happened in some other countries – and as many had predicted would happen here.

And while in the past some have accused the NHS of being inflexible and monolithic, when the virus struck, our nurses, doctors, therapists, engineers, scientists and countless other staff rolled up their sleeves and set about transforming care in a way unimaginable at the start of the year.

'The coronavirus pandemic has tested the NHS and its staff in a way not seen before in its 71-year history. At the peak of this outbreak, hospitals in England were treating around 19,000 patients a day with Covid-19, a virus unknown just a few short months ago,' says Sir Simon Stevens

'The coronavirus pandemic has tested the NHS and its staff in a way not seen before in its 71-year history. At the peak of this outbreak, hospitals in England were treating around 19,000 patients a day with Covid-19, a virus unknown just a few short months ago,' says Sir Simon Stevens

‘The coronavirus pandemic has tested the NHS and its staff in a way not seen before in its 71-year history. At the peak of this outbreak, hospitals in England were treating around 19,000 patients a day with Covid-19, a virus unknown just a few short months ago,’ says Sir Simon Stevens

Hospitals were redesigned to double critical care capacity, with operating theatres and recovery bays repurposed to provide ventilators for the sickest patients with coronavirus.

Barriers between NHS hospital and community services have been erased, and specialist mental health crisis services created.

Local councils, care providers, the Armed Forces, the private sector and volunteers have all pitched in as part of the truly national effort to tackle coronavirus.

Specialist nurses, GPs, local authority public health infection control experts and others are rightly now supporting the nation’s care homes, which have historically operated independently of the NHS.

And contrary to some commentary, the number of patients discharged from hospitals to care homes each day actually went down, as expanded community services rose to the challenge.

Remote consultations have proved a crucial way of keeping patients and staff safe, and plans to roll them out across the NHS have been achieved in weeks rather than years.

GPs have switched from conducting around nine out of 10 consultations in person to managing more than four out of five remotely. Remote consultations should never replace face-to-face appointments for those who want them but are a useful option for providing convenient and timely care for many.

This formidable ‘can do’ spirit will only be more important in the months and years ahead.

I have personally experienced the way this virus can leave you flat on your back and, thankfully, was among the majority who got through it.

But the tragic truth is that for many, that has not been the outcome. Indeed, my family has sadly lost two people close to us through this terrible virus.

Scientists and clinicians are still working to understand the virus but one thing is now clear: Covid does not hit us all equally. Age, ethnicity and inequality all compound the risk.

And underlying health risks such as obesity dramatically magnify the danger. So one of the legacies of this emergency must be that the NHS – along with wider society – redoubles its efforts to help people live healthier, long lives.

Helping patients who have survived will be a huge job. The first Seacole centre, providing rehabilitation services for those who have had the virus, opened a fortnight to go and we will need more of this.

The health service must also remain able to respond to any future Covid flare-ups. This means keeping at least some of the amazing Nightingale hospitals in reserve, as well as extra hospital and community services. The new NHS partnership with independent hospitals is also continuing to provide extra beds, staff, operating theatres and equipment.

Even then, resuming non-urgent services paused while we dealt with the coronavirus peak will be a challenge.

Patients and their families will need to play their part by isolating for two weeks before an operation.

The Government is working hard to get NHS staff the personal protective equipment (PPE) that they need, and demand for masks, gowns and aprons will go up as we see more patients return for treatment.

So I would like to once again thank on behalf of the whole NHS the generous Daily Mail readers and Mail Force donors who have provided extra kit for colleagues on the health and social care frontline.

This very practical expression of public support for our staff has been hugely welcome everywhere it has been received.

Since the foundation of the NHS in 1948 staff and patients have benefited from the support of volunteers and philanthropists, and the Mail Force campaign upholds that fine tradition.

We know that some people have been deterred from seeking help by fears over coronavirus or because they did not want to be ‘a burden’ at a busy time.

Our message to Daily Mail readers today is: If you do need help, don’t delay. Please help us to help you.

Whether you are a worried parent of a sick child, or you or a loved one have symptoms of a heart attack or stroke, seek help as you always would. Not coming forward can have serious consequences – now or in the future.

That also applies to those with cancer worries. The NHS has treated as many cancer patients as possible where it has been safe to do so and these numbers will rise as the virus recedes.

But we know from staff on the frontline that far fewer people came forward for cancer checks last month.

While urgent cancer referrals are now picking back up – having doubled over the past three weeks – catching cancers early makes them easier to treat and saves lives.

Over the coming months, the NHS will be moving Heaven and Earth to restart services for patients who need this support.

While we want to see the NHS returning to business as usual there are some changes that patients and staff will welcome.

A&E visits for alcohol intoxication fell by 59 per cent last month. We should reflect on how that could be maintained in the future. When pubs and clubs reopen, nobody wants to go back to drunk and disorderly behaviour swelling the numbers at busy A&Es.

The entire country has mobilised to deal with coronavirus in a way not seen since the Second World War. The NHS was born out of the sacrifice of that conflict.

We owe it to all those who have given so much in the fight against Covid-19 to ensure that we build an even better, stronger and agile NHS for the future.

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