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Simon Stevens (photo) has declared an emergency for air pollution

NHS boss explains air pollution & # 39; health need & # 39; because research blames 36,000 deaths a year and higher rates of asthma, strokes and cardiac arrests

  • Researchers compared hospital records in nine cities with environmental records
  • Increase in short-term conditions and a wider impact in the long term
  • The figures are released today by UK100 health network prior to the big summit
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Simon Stevens (photo) has declared an emergency for air pollution

Simon Stevens (photo) has declared an emergency for air pollution

Britain is going through a "health emergency" due to polluted air, a NHS chief warns.

Air pollution contributes annually to 36,000 deaths in England and causes significant health risks, claiming the number of cardiac arrests, strokes and severe asthma as a result.

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Experts from King & # 39; s College London discovered that significantly higher numbers of hospital admissions for these three health problems occur when bad air levels rise.

The researchers emphasized that these short-term effects complement the long-term impact of air pollution, which is estimated to contribute to heart disease, dementia and respiratory diseases.

The researchers compared hospital data in nine English cities with environmental reports. For more than a year, they found that on days of high air pollution, there were a total of 124 cardiac arrests, 231 strokes, and 193 serious asthma attacks.

Responding to the figures, Simon Stevens, the chief executive of NHS England, said: “As these new figures show, air pollution is now causing thousands of blows, cardiac arrests and asthma attacks, so it is clear that the climate situation is also a health issue.

"Because these preventable deaths are happening now – not in 2025 or 2050 – we must act now.

"For the NHS, that means further extensive action building on the reduction of our carbon footprint from one fifth in the last decade."

The figures are released today by UK100 health network prior to the International Clean Air Summit in London on Wednesday. Polly Billington, director of UK100, said: "Air pollution is a problem in cities across the country, where children and adults are being hospitalized due to life-threatening conditions.

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"That is an individual tragedy for each of them, and together a huge burden for our NHS. The local government needs additional powers and resources to tackle this public health crisis. & # 39;

Experts from King & # 39; s College London discovered that significantly higher numbers of hospital admissions for these three health problems occur when bad air levels rise.

Experts from King & # 39; s College London discovered that significantly higher numbers of hospital admissions for these three health problems occur when bad air levels rise.

Experts from King & # 39; s College London discovered that significantly higher numbers of hospital admissions for these three health problems occur when bad air levels rise.

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