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Image material was dug up at Queen Victoria's Museum of Modern Art in New York, where he visited Ireland in 1900, pictured

Amazing images of Queen Victoria were dug up after being discarded for decades in an archive in a museum in New York.

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It shows that dignitaries were greeted by dignitaries during a trip to Ireland in 1900, just a year before she died in what was probably the last time she was caught in front of the camera.

In the sharp black-and-white images Victoria smiles, who appears to be wearing sunglasses, while she hands over a huge basket of flowers by two girls, who bend as they approach her.

She is also seen with an umbrella that she seems to use to protect herself from the sun.

The film was discovered by curator Bryony Dixon of the British Film Institute at the New York Museum of Modern Art, who said she was stunned when she came across it.

Image material was dug up at Queen Victoria's Museum of Modern Art in New York, where he visited Ireland in 1900, pictured

Image material was dug up at Queen Victoria's Museum of Modern Art in New York, where he visited Ireland in 1900, pictured

The monarch is seen in a carriage, in what looks like sunglasses and a smile, in contrast to her usual serious appearance
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The monarch is seen in a carriage, in what looks like sunglasses and a smile, in contrast to her usual serious appearance

The monarch is seen in a carriage, in what looks like sunglasses and a smile, in contrast to her usual serious appearance

Mrs. Dixon said: & I almost fell off my chair because I had never seen Victoria up close.

& # 39; It is completely unique because you can see the face of the queen for the first time since 1900, because this was shown … you can see her expressions, you can see her in motion instead of just as a rigid portrait or photo. & # 39;

She added that the images humanize the & # 39; monarch & # 39; because it makes her smile instead of the stoic expression she often showed in official portraits during her 63-year reign.

Mrs. Dixon said: & # 39; It is very rare to see her smile. She does not do that in all her portraits, so I think she is humanizing her for the first time. & # 39;

She added: “Queen Victoria was always very up-to-date with technology and she was interested in art.

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& # 39; She was primarily interested in photography, so we see her moving instead of a posed photo or painting. & # 39;

The smiling images come as a new exhibition on the Isle of Wight also has the softer side of the & # 39; stiff and correct & # 39; marked monarch.

English Heritage emphasizes the nude sculptures and a painting of bathing girls that Victoria and Prince Albert gave each other in a shop window in Osborne House, the couple's holiday home on the Isle of Wight, to celebrate the 200th birthday.

The researchers say it proves that the couple despite their prim public persona & # 39; s a & # 39; passionate & # 39; has shared private life.

Michael Hunter, curator at Osborne, said: & Queen Victoria can be remembered as the grieving widow in black, but these gifts show a different side to her personality.

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& # 39; She was open to nudity and the sensual, more open than Albert who perhaps surprisingly was the more prudish of the pair. & # 39;

The film would be the last time she was caught in front of the camera a year later before she died

The film would be the last time she was caught in front of the camera a year later before she died

The film would be the last time she was caught in front of the camera a year later before she died

The images of the Victoria laugh are in stark contrast to her stoic expression in photos & # 39; s and official photos & # 39; s, depicted

The images of the Victoria laugh are in stark contrast to her stoic expression in photos & # 39; s and official photos & # 39; s, depicted

The images of the Victoria laugh are in stark contrast to her stoic expression in photos & # 39; s and official photos & # 39; s, depicted

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For example, Victoria bought the Florinda from artist Franz Xaver Winterhalter, a painting of half-naked women getting ready to bathe for one of Albert's birthdays, and it was her wish that it would hang right in front of their desks in Osborne, where it would today is still.

And when Albert commissioned a statue of herself as a Greek warrior for Queen Victoria's birthday in 1844, she wrote in her diary that it & # 39; very beautiful & # 39; used to be.

Victoria was born in 1819 as Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, the fourth son of King George III.

Both the duke and the king died in 1820, and Victoria was raised under the strict supervision of her mother, Princess Victoria of Saxony-Coburg-Saalfeld.

She inherited the throne at the age of 18, after her father's three older brothers had all died, leaving no remaining legal children.

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Victoria married her first cousin Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha in 1840 and they had nine children.

They married their descendants into royal and noble families across the continent, giving Victoria the nickname & # 39; the grandmother of Europe & # 39; received.

But after Albert & # 39; s death in 1861, she withdrew from public appearances and became known for wearing black and living in mourning.

However she remained popular during her reign and had Golden and Diamond Anniversaries that saw enormous public celebrations.

She was the longest-serving prince in the UK with 63 years and seven months until Queen Elizabeth II broke the record in September 2015.

Queen Victoria died in January 1901 and was succeeded by her eldest son, Edward VII.

Victoria withdrew from public appearances after the death of husband Prince Albert, depicted together in 1861, and & # 39; lived in mourning & # 39;

Victoria withdrew from public appearances after the death of husband Prince Albert, depicted together in 1861, and & # 39; lived in mourning & # 39;

Victoria withdrew from public appearances after the death of husband Prince Albert, depicted together in 1861, and & # 39; lived in mourning & # 39;

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