New Zealand wants to introduce a smoking ban for Kiwis born after 2004

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New Zealand Hopes To Introduce Tobacco Ban For Kiwis Born After 2004 – As It Continues With Plans To Be Smoke-Free By 2025

  • New Zealand could ban smoking under new laws for anyone born after 2004
  • A whole series of radically new proposals are currently under discussion in parliament
  • One in ten Kiwis is a smoker, with the Māori and Pasifika communities most affected

New Zealand is trying to quit smoking by banning anyone born after 2004 from buying tobacco.

The move is part of a series of proposals being considered by parliament in line with the country’s goal of being smoke-free by 2025.

If the new laws are passed, the age of legal smoking will gradually increase, filters on cigarettes will be banned, tobacco cannot be sold outside specialist shops aged 18 and over, and the amount of nicotine in tobacco can be reduced. reduced.

New Zealand is trying to quit smoking by banning anyone born after 2004 from buying tobacco.  Pictured: Young race drivers in Christchurch

New Zealand is trying to quit smoking by banning anyone born after 2004 from buying tobacco. Pictured: Young race drivers in Christchurch

Aotearoa, the Māori name for New Zealand, has a population of about five million people and it is estimated that about 500,000, or one in ten people smoke every day.

“About 4,500 New Zealanders die from tobacco every year, and we need to accelerate progress to reach that goal (ie be smoke-free by 2025),” said New Zealand Health Minister Dr. Ayesha Verrall.

Business as usual without a tobacco control program will not get us there. We need a new approach.

These include proposals to reduce access to tobacco through various outlets, as well as reduce the palatability of cigarettes by addressing the use of menthol crush-balls filters and filters themselves, and possibly also create a reserve price for cigarettes and tobacco . ‘

Dr. Verrall says a ‘smoke-free generation’ could become a reality if tobacco sales are banned from 2022 to people under 18.

That would mean that someone born after 2004 would never be able to legally buy tobacco.

“In fact, it could extend the age of access to tobacco by two, five or so years to an age when it is much less likely to start smoking,” said Dr. Verrall.

A 'smoke-free generation' could become a reality if tobacco sales are banned from 2022 to people under the age of 18.  Pictured: New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern

A ‘smoke-free generation’ could become a reality if tobacco sales are banned from 2022 to people under the age of 18. Pictured: New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern

New Zealand has a population of about five million and it is estimated that about 500,000, or one in ten, smoke daily

New Zealand has a population of about five million and it is estimated that about 500,000, or one in ten, smoke daily

But not everyone is in favor of the ‘extreme move’.

The right-wing political party ACT said one of the restrictions being looked at – lowering the amount of nicotine in cigarettes – could cost working-class smokers a fortune as they would have to buy more to get the same hit.

“ Smokers in New Zealand who can least afford it will spend more on their habit and, in turn, harm those around them if the government prescribes lower nicotine, ” said Karen Chhour, ACT spokesman for social security. development and children, in a statement.

“ There is also a strong argument that this will boost the trade in black market tobacco with high nicotine content, prompting those addicted to cigarettes to turn to crime to feed their habit. ”

The right-wing political party ACT said one of the restrictions being looked at - lowering the amount of nicotine in cigarettes - could cost working-class smokers a fortune, as they would have to buy more to get the same hit (stock image )

The right-wing political party ACT said one of the restrictions being looked at – lowering the amount of nicotine in cigarettes – could cost working-class smokers a fortune, as they would have to buy more to get the same hit (stock image )

Small independent retailers such as convenience stores, convenience stores and gas stations have also raised concerns about banning tobacco sales from their businesses, which will trigger a tsunami of bankruptcies across the country.

The group most affected by the effects of smoking are the Māori and Pasifika communities in New Zealand, where cancer is the leading cause of death for Māori women and the second leading cause of Māori men.

Māori anti-smoking attorney Shane Kawenata Bradbrook said the new laws could contribute to the “permanent demise of tobacco products in this country.”

The tobacco industry has made our people addicted for too long by stripping them of their money before we have to bury them in urupa [burial grounds] all over this country, ”he said.

“I’m looking forward to really turning it into a sunset industry in this corner of the world.”

Small independent retailers such as convenience stores, convenience stores and gas stations have also put on concerts banning the sale of tobacco from their businesses, which will trigger a tsunami of bankruptcies

Small independent retailers such as convenience stores, convenience stores and gas stations have also put on concerts banning the sale of tobacco from their businesses, which will trigger a tsunami of bankruptcies

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