New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern shares a throwback photo as a student

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Jacinda Ardern was once a bright-eyed young student nicknamed ‘Aunty Jack’ who dreamed of becoming a police officer like her father.

She would have to settle for the Prime Minister of New Zealand.

The popular leader, now 40, attended her Morrinsville Intermediate youth school on Thursday to celebrate her 50th anniversary.

She was shocked to discover that her tattooed former woodworking teacher, Stuart King, was still working at the rural school two hours’ drive south of Auckland.

Mrs. Ardern also shared an old class photo of her standing in the back row in her school uniform with a shy smile at the age of 11 or 12.

Jacinda Ardern ringed a photo of herself in this crop of her middle-class Morrinsville photo, circa 1991 - so we didn't have to guess

Jacinda Ardern ringed a photo of herself in this crop of her middle-class Morrinsville photo, circa 1991 – so we didn’t have to guess

A for Ardern: The Prime Minister of Kiwi gives her longtime woodworking teacher, Stuart King, a wooden police car she made in his class when she went to Morrinsville Intermediate in the early 1990s

A for Ardern: The Prime Minister of Kiwi gives her longtime woodworking teacher, Stuart King, a wooden police car she made in his class when she went to Morrinsville Intermediate in the early 1990s

A for Ardern: The Prime Minister of Kiwi gives her longtime woodworking teacher, Stuart King, a wooden police car she made in his class when she went to Morrinsville Intermediate in the early 1990s

“A special treat was seeing Mr. King – my old woodworking teacher who is retiring after 46 years at school,” Ardern wrote on Facebook.

“I posted a few stories about Mr. King yesterday and it was so nice to see how many people remembered him and his sayings (to this day I hear him say” pretty crunchy huh “when he was really excited.) ‘

Ardern said the anniversary was “a happy excuse to visit.”

‘I suspect I ended up bored everyone with my nostalgia.

“Thank you for everything, Mr. King, and for being so nice to the old car I made in your class and brought it to show you.”

Ardern’s photos showed her presenting a radiant Mr. King with the wooden model of a police car.

According to 2020 biography, Jacinda Ardern: A New Kind of Leader, Jacinda developed ‘a keen eye for dishonesty’ at Morrinsville Intermediate.

In the biography, Madeleine Chapman wrote that Ardern was motivated to channel “ her energy ” about seeing poverty and dishonesty by joining the student council at school.

During meetings in the staff room, young councilors, between the ages of 11 and 13, expressed concerns about the high price of juice, the frozen snack, or their skepticism about safety that has prevented them from cycling for the last 50 years. meters to school. ‘

The issues were raised seriously enough, but the seriousness of the delivery of the young councilors hid the fact that most of the students had applied to the council for one reason and one reason only: to get out of class for a while. come.

Stuart King and Jacinda Ardern catch up on her old school 50th anniversary visit. She told Mr. King “pretty crunchy, huh?” when he was excited

Long before she was one of the world's most influential leaders, Jacinda Ardern was a precocious young child with a passion for politics

Long before she was one of the world's most influential leaders, Jacinda Ardern was a precocious young child with a passion for politics

Long before she was one of the world’s most influential leaders, Jacinda Ardern was a precocious young child with a passion for politics

When she was only 18, Ms. Ardern was named by her colleagues as the student most likely to become prime minister.

Other categories include the best looking, friendliest, happiest, sportiest, funniest, loudest, and most promising.

Mrs. Ardern told it Herald Focus she was only voted “because I was the only one who cared about politics at school.”

Somehow there is a natural assumption that I would end up there. I thought I was going to be a cop. ‘

But it seems the precocious young woman made no secret of her desire to become a leader.

In an interview with her local newspaper in 1997, a young Mrs. Ardern opened up about her goal of becoming New Zealand’s first female Prime Minister. named as the winner of the Waikato Regional Competition of the United Nations New Zealand Speech Competition.

In the interview, she shared how her passion for public speaking could serve her well in politics.

The New Zealand Prime Minister's story from humble beginnings to celebrated politician is documented in a new biography, proving that she has always been a voice of the people.

The New Zealand Prime Minister's story from humble beginnings to celebrated politician is documented in a new biography, proving that she has always been a voice of the people.

The New Zealand Prime Minister’s story from humble beginnings to celebrated politician is documented in a new biography, proving that she has always been a voice of the people.

An old yearbook from her time at Morrinsville College in 1998 has resurfaced showing how she was tipped for greatness even as a teenager

An old yearbook from her time at Morrinsville College in 1998 has resurfaced showing how she was tipped for greatness even as a teenager

An old yearbook from her time at Morrinsville College in 1998 has resurfaced showing how she was tipped for greatness even as a teenager

The focus of her speech was Substance Abuse: The Human ScrougeMs Adern argued that the UN should allocate more resources to combat drug addiction.

Ms. Malcon approached me about the match about five days earlier. So the speech wasn’t as fully prepared as I wanted, ”she said.

And while Ms. Adern failed to fulfill her dream of becoming New Zealand’s first female Prime Minister – that honor went to her mentor Helen Clark – she broke down several barriers during her tenure.

When she first took office in 2017, she became the world’s youngest female government leader at the age of 37.

She made history as one of the few women to have given birth to power.

She has since been lauded for handling catastrophic events, including the Christchurch terror attack, the White Island volcanic disaster and the coronavirus pandemic.

Growing up, Ms. Ardern was a long way from the no-nonsense leader she has become.

Ms. Ardern, who was raised Mormon, is the product of a police officer father and mother who worked in the school cafeteria.

She grew up with the encouragement to dress modestly and to stay away from coffee, cigarettes, and alcohol.

And while she may not have stood out to her peers, her teachers had always taken note of her. She was known to the school staff as someone who would go far.

After graduating from the University of Waikato She received a bachelor’s degree in communication science in public relations and political science and went on to work under the then Prime Minister Helen Clark.

Mrs. Ardern (photo at 18) studied public relations and political science at the University of Waikato before working under former Prime Minister Helen Clark

Mrs. Ardern (photo at 18) studied public relations and political science at the University of Waikato before working under former Prime Minister Helen Clark

Mrs. Ardern (photo at 18) studied public relations and political science at the University of Waikato before working under former Prime Minister Helen Clark

Ms. Ardern was depicted wearing a black headscarf as a sign of solidarity as she embraced the grieving relatives of the murdered victims of the Christchurch massacre on March 17, 2019.

Ms. Ardern was depicted wearing a black headscarf as a sign of solidarity as she embraced the grieving relatives of the murdered victims of the Christchurch massacre on March 17, 2019.

Ms. Ardern was depicted wearing a black headscarf as a sign of solidarity as she embraced the grieving relatives of the murdered victims of the Christchurch massacre on March 17, 2019.

Critics have long compared Ms. Ardern’s leadership style to that of the former Labor leader, New Zealand’s fifth-longest-serving Prime Minister and second woman to hold office.

Ms Ardern then moved to London where she worked as a senior policy advisor to British Prime Minister Tony Blair in the UK cabinet.

Over the years, she became known as an advocate for women, children, and often spoke about New Zealand’s education system.

During this time, the Labor Party struggled in the polls. John Key had served as prime minister for two terms under National.

And the party was looking for an easy third term due to the inconsistency of leadership within the Labor Party.

The then-leader Andrew Little was unpopular in the polls and there was talk of Jacinda Ardern stepping into the role.

But Mrs. Ardern was young, she didn’t want to come first.

In 2014 she said, ‘I’ve seen how difficult it is to start a family in that role’.

In 2015 she said, “I don’t want to become prime minister.”

On her way to become a Member of Parliament for Auckland’s Mt Albert electorate in 2017, she was elected the new Labor Party leader.

With less than two months before the polls closed, Ms Adern saw an astonishing victory and became the country’s third female prime minister.

She has become New Zealandmost popular Prime Minister in more than 100 years after leading the country through a series of crises.