New Zealand jockey Sophia Malthus reveals life after accident that left her quadriplegic

The world of Sophia Malthus will turn forever, when she was thrown from a dishonest racehorse in November 2016 and broke her neck

It took only a fraction of a second for the world of Sophia Malthus to turn face down forever, when she was thrown from a dishonest racehorse and broke her neck.

The brief moment of November 2016 changed not only the life of the 19 years, but also every interaction it has with the world that surrounds it since then.

Suddenly, facing an uncertain future, the New Zealander was forced to deal with a new identity, one forged after an accident for the sport he had dedicated for more than a decade.

Sophia, now 21, suffered a C4-5 spinal cord injury in the fall, causing quadriplegia, leaving her with almost no sensation or motor skills from the clavicle down.

But two years later, he has come to use the platform obtained from his Instagram account and his feature in a documentary that was broadcast in New Zealand earlier this year.

The world of Sophia Malthus will turn forever, when she was thrown from a dishonest racehorse in November 2016 and broke her neck

The world of Sophia Malthus will turn forever, when she was thrown from a dishonest racehorse in November 2016 and broke her neck

The brief moment of November 2016 changed not only the life of the 19 years, but also every interaction that has with the world that surrounds it from

The brief moment of November 2016 changed not only the life of the 19 years, but also every interaction that has with the world that surrounds it from

The brief moment of November 2016 changed not only the life of the 19 years, but also every interaction that has with the world that surrounds it from

After winning several thousand followers, she regularly shows other survivors of spinal cord injuries worldwide the possibilities of life after the injury.

However, despite this pragmatic attitude, Sophia is sure not to overlook the realities of quadriplegia, especially in its presence on social networks.

"One thing I definitely fight with on Instagram is how honestly I should be portraying a spinal cord injury," he told Daily Mail Australia.

"I know that my Instagram account shows to other young girls who just had a spinal cord injury and I want them to know that you can still have a happy and satisfying life.

"But people should also realize that I did not break my neck and came back to life, I have not been to school or work in two years.

"I have not left, it has had a massive impact on everything, there is not a part of my life that does not affect, but I still want people to know that I am still happy."

In addition to its impact that altered life, the accident marked the end of an incipient equestrian career, which led Sophia to move from the South Island of New Zealand to Auckland to train.

"I always thought that I would become a jockey, although it's a lot of work, we would work 13 days and a day off from 4:30 AM, it was all my life," he said.

The fall resulted in a C4-5 spinal cord injury - causing quadriplegia, leaving Sophia, now 21, with almost no sensation or motor skills from the clavicle down

The fall resulted in a C4-5 spinal cord injury - causing quadriplegia, leaving Sophia, now 21, with almost no sensation or motor skills from the clavicle down

The fall resulted in a C4-5 spinal cord injury – causing quadriplegia, leaving Sophia, now 21, with almost no sensation or motor skills from the clavicle down

Life after the accident presented a hugely altered world for Sophia, which now includes a series of personal caregivers, physiotherapists and public insurance officers who finance much of her new medical needs.

Life after the accident presented a hugely altered world for Sophia, which now includes a series of personal caregivers, physiotherapists and public insurance officers who finance much of her new medical needs.

Life after the accident presented a hugely altered world for Sophia, which now includes a series of personal caregivers, physiotherapists and public insurance officers who finance much of her new medical needs.

"Then it was completely taken away from me in half a second, which is incredible."

What started as a normal day in the racing barn soon became frightening when the horse Sophia was "scared" and pushed her towards a fence.

"The horse escaped my control and, once we reached a curve, we both got up and that's how I landed on the fence and the horse went through the fence," he explained.

After a period of six days in intensive care, Sophia was transferred to a spinal unit for 12 weeks and then to a residential rehabilitation for nine more months, while her family struggled to find a new wheelchair accessible home.

When leaving the rehabilitation, the life after the accident also presented a world greatly altered for Sophia, which now includes a series of personal caregivers, physiotherapists and public insurance officers who finance much of their new medical needs.

"Before you're in a wheelchair, you have no idea what it's like to live in a wheelchair," he said.

According to Sophia, it was this perspective that allowed her to accept the comparatively gloomy forecast and reach an agreement with her new life

According to Sophia, it was this perspective that allowed her to accept the comparatively gloomy forecast and reach an agreement with her new life

When leaving the rehabilitation, the life after the accident also presented a world greatly altered for Sophia, which now includes a series of personal caregivers, physiotherapists and public insurance officers that finance much of their new medical needs.

When leaving the rehabilitation, the life after the accident also presented a world greatly altered for Sophia, which now includes a series of personal caregivers, physiotherapists and public insurance officers that finance much of their new medical need.

When leaving the rehabilitation, the life after the accident also presented a world greatly altered for Sophia, which now includes a series of personal caregivers, physiotherapists and public insurance officers that finance much of their new medical need.

When leaving the rehabilitation, the life after the accident also presented a world greatly altered for Sophia, which now includes a series of personal caregivers, physiotherapists and public insurance officers that finance much of their new medical need.

"I was in the hospital looking at the ceiling and I thought:" I'm going to be in bed for the rest of my life. "

"Then, when I realized that I would be in a wheelchair, I thought:" My God, I will never be able to do anything ", but I can do enough things, there are many challenges.

According to Sophia, it was this perspective that allowed her to accept the comparatively gloomy forecast and reach an agreement with her new life.

"A lot of people really get obsessed with the fact that people trust others to dress them and things like that, but it's like it's a waste of time," he said.

"But if I just leave it, I can enjoy the good times and move on."

And despite the severe nature of her injury, Sophia says that recovery also came with a variety of unexpected benefits.

"We always say, thank God that I am the person and that we are the family that suffered the injury because not many people could have solved it," said Sophia (pictured with her stepfather James)

Despite her pragmatic attitude, Sophia is sure she does not overlook the realities of life with quadriplegia, especially in her presence on social media, saying: "I want (other young people with spinal cord injuries) to know that you can still have a happy and full life & # 39;

Despite her pragmatic attitude, Sophia is sure she does not overlook the realities of life with quadriplegia, especially in her presence on social media, saying: "I want (other young people with spinal cord injuries) to know that you can still have a happy and full life & # 39;

Despite her pragmatic attitude, Sophia is sure she does not overlook the realities of life with quadriplegia, especially in her presence on social media, saying: "I want (other young people with spinal cord injuries) to know that you can still have a happy and full life & # 39;

"It was summer when I was in (the spinal unit) with a group of boys, so I was there with seven young guys and it was the funniest moment of my life," he said.

"That experience was very good for my emotional well-being, to be close to such a great group of guys that I'm still such a good friend," he said.

This new reality has also seen Sophia change her role in the equestrian industry of New Zealand from an aspiring apprentice rider who is taking out the stables, to the presentation of prizes in some of the most important races in the country.

"Now I'm with the high officials, whereas before I was more alone with someone picking up *** and riding a horse and it's nice to be with the big rich, but I want to be fucking and doing the job," he revealed. .

Much of this positive facilitation is due to Sophia's relentlessly caring parents, including her mother Flick and stepfather James.

She told the Daily Mail Australia: "We always say, thank God I'm the person and we're the family that got the injury because not many people could have solved it."

"I know that my Instagram account is shown to other young girls who just had a spinal cord industry and I want them to know that you can still have a happy and fulfilling life," Sophia told Daily Mail Australia.

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