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New Yorkers avoid subways during the morning rush hour commute

The public transportation system of New York City seemed to be pretty empty during Tuesday morning’s rush, when New Yorkers responded to mayor Bill de Blasio’s warning to stay out of the subway due to the spread of the new corona virus.

Although trains were less busy during rush hour, some people were still seen doing their daily commute. Even stations such as Columbus Circle in Manhattan were much less crowded than normal.

Photos showed wary New Yorkers wearing protective gloves and masks as they went to work.

On Monday, the Blasio urged people to walk or cycle to work and said that residents should not use the metro unless it is essential after the number of coronavirus cases in the state had risen to 148.

The mayor also said that people who are sick should stay out of public transportation if they can.

‘When we are all packed like sardines during rush hour, you are really close to your fellow New Yorkers. We would like people not to be in that situation when they are sick, “de Blasio said.

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The public transportation system of New York City seemed to be pretty empty during Tuesday morning's rush, when New Yorkers responded to Mayor Bill de Blasio's warning to stay out of the subway due to the spread of the corona virus. Pictured is an empty platform in Brooklyn

The public transportation system of New York City seemed to be pretty empty during Tuesday morning’s rush, when New Yorkers responded to Mayor Bill de Blasio’s warning to stay out of the subway due to the spread of the corona virus. Pictured is an empty platform in Brooklyn

Although trains were less busy during rush hour, some people were still seen doing their daily commute. New Yorkers depicted at the Newkirk Plaza station in Brooklyn

Although trains were less busy during rush hour, some people were still seen doing their daily commute. New Yorkers depicted at the Newkirk Plaza station in Brooklyn

Although trains were less busy during rush hour, some people were still seen doing their daily commute. New Yorkers depicted at the Newkirk Plaza station in Brooklyn

Photos showing wary New Yorkers wearing protective gloves while holding the sticks and masks on the Manhattan train on Tuesday morning

Photos showing wary New Yorkers wearing protective gloves while holding the sticks and masks on the Manhattan train on Tuesday morning

Photos showing wary New Yorkers wearing protective gloves while holding the sticks and masks on the Manhattan train on Tuesday morning

Even the main 59th St Columbus Circle subway station in Manhattan showed light foot traffic on Tuesday morning

Even the main 59th St Columbus Circle subway station in Manhattan showed light foot traffic on Tuesday morning

Even the main 59th St Columbus Circle subway station in Manhattan showed light foot traffic on Tuesday morning

A usually full Q subway station in Manhattan shows escalators with a lot of space during the commuter traffic on Tuesday morning

A usually full Q subway station in Manhattan shows escalators with a lot of space during the commuter traffic on Tuesday morning

A usually full Q subway station in Manhattan shows escalators with a lot of space during the commuter traffic on Tuesday morning

This image shows an empty metro network with an express train 2 that is waiting for a station in Brooklyn on Tuesday

This image shows an empty metro network with an express train 2 that is waiting for a station in Brooklyn on Tuesday

This image shows an empty metro network with an express train 2 that is waiting for a station in Brooklyn on Tuesday

Coronavirus cases have risen to 765 in the United States while the virus continues to spread. The virus has already killed 26 people in the US

Coronavirus cases have risen to 765 in the United States while the virus continues to spread. The virus has already killed 26 people in the US

Coronavirus cases have risen to 765 in the United States while the virus continues to spread. The virus has already killed 26 people in the US

Subways remained full during rush hour, although officials from the Metropolitan Transportation Authority said during a briefing that anecdotal evidence suggests that they have been less busy in recent days.

“We urge employers to change people the times they come to work and the times they leave work so that we can spread people and be less busy,” said New York City interim director Sarah Feinberg Monday. “I can see that happen.”

A DailyMail.com request for comment on the MTA was not immediately returned.

This image shows the peak on Tuesday morning
This image shows the normal crowds at the Grand Central Station

Grand Central (shown on Tuesday morning) showed very few commuters during the rush hour at 7.34 am compared to the normal chaos associated with a morning or evening commute at the station

Feinberg positively supplements the head of NY / NJ harbor authority, Rick Cotton, for the corona virus.

Cotton, who works from home, had been on the ground at various airports run by the Port Authority. Members of his team are being tested and are currently being quarantined.

Many people took advantage of the city’s bicycle sharing program, Citi Bike, that the docking stations in Lower Manhattan had almost no space in the morning.

Monday it was revealed that Rick Cotton (photo), the head of the Port Authority of New York, tested positive for the virus

Monday it was revealed that Rick Cotton (photo), the head of the Port Authority of New York, tested positive for the virus

Monday it was revealed that Rick Cotton (photo), the head of the Port Authority of New York, tested positive for the virus

Natalie Davis takes the subway to Manhattan from Brooklyn to work at The Nature Conservancy and said her concerns about the virus have not changed her routine.

However, the 31-year-old added that she noticed that people were acting differently at the entrance to the subway at the World Trade Center, where she and two colleagues asked for donations.

“We usually have high-five people and they like it, but in the last two weeks, people have had something like this:” Hey, that’s OK, I’m good, “she said.

Joan Chiverton, a freelance illustrator who waited for a subway station on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, said, “I’m not trying to touch the railings and the turnstiles with my hands.”

‘I also try to keep my distance from people who cough. I do that normally, but now I actually leave people and don’t worry if it seems like I’m rude. “

Almost 100 of the coronavirus cases in New York are traced to a community in the Westchester County suburb of New Rochelle, where one of the first patients tested positive in the state.

Despite warning commuters to stay out of the subway Monday, the Blasio said Tuesday that there will be no widespread school closures at the moment and insists that there will be no Italian style closure, as he confirmed five new coronavirus cases in the city.

On Monday, the Blasio (photo) encouraged people to walk or cycle to work and said that residents should not use the metro unless it is essential

On Monday, the Blasio (photo) encouraged people to walk or cycle to work and said that residents should not use the metro unless it is essential

On Monday, the Blasio (photo) encouraged people to walk or cycle to work and said that residents should not use the metro unless it is essential

And several New Yorkers have obeyed the mayor's order. During the commuter traffic on Monday evening, there were several empty cars (6 train pictured) on the 6 train line in Manhattan

And several New Yorkers have obeyed the mayor's order. During the commuter traffic on Monday evening, there were several empty cars (6 trains shown) on the 6 train line in Manhattan

And several New Yorkers have obeyed the mayor’s order. During the commuter traffic on Monday evening, there were several empty cars (6 trains shown) on the 6 train line in Manhattan

Everywhere in the city there were empty platforms (6 trains depicted in Manhattan) because New Yorkers avoided the trains on Monday

Everywhere in the city there were empty platforms (6 trains depicted in Manhattan) because New Yorkers avoided the trains on Monday

Everywhere in the city there were empty platforms (6 trains depicted in Manhattan) because New Yorkers avoided the trains on Monday

This image shows the Bleecker Street subway station in Manhattan with very little foot traffic on the platform on Monday evening

This image shows the Bleecker Street subway station in Manhattan with very little foot traffic on the platform on Monday evening

This image shows the Bleecker Street subway station in Manhattan with very little foot traffic on the platform on Monday evening

This image shows a woman walking downstairs at the Port Authority station in Manhattan on Monday

This image shows a woman walking downstairs at the Port Authority station in Manhattan on Monday

This image shows a woman walking downstairs at the Port Authority station in Manhattan on Monday

There are now 25 confirmed cases of coronavirus in New York City.

De Blasio said New York City will not close to control the corona virus outbreak.

“We cannot close because of unnecessary fear,” de Blasio told MSNBC Good morning Joe.

“I would discourage these massive closures if we keep this situation relatively contained … ask me in a week, ask me in a month – it can change.”

He is also not considering widespread closures of public schools at the moment. Health officials have said before that school closures in the city would be a last resort.

The outbreak has resulted in a number of mostly private schools that have canceled or interrupted their classes. In New York City, Columbia University, Yeshiva University and New York University have announced that classes will be canceled or offered online.

Other suburban rail suburbs in Connecticut and New Jersey have also reported stray cases. New Jersey has reported 11 cases and Connecticut has reported two.

For most people, the new coronavirus only causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough.

But for others, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more serious illnesses, including pneumonia.

The vast majority of people recover from the new virus. According to the World Health Organization, people with mild illness recover after about two weeks, while people with more serious illness take three to six weeks to recover.

Commuters (pictured Monday on a Manhattan train) have seen protective gloves and added additional sheaths to their phones during their commute to New York City

Commuters (pictured Monday on a Manhattan train) have seen protective gloves and added additional sheaths to their phones during their commute to New York City

Commuters (pictured Monday on a Manhattan train) have seen protective gloves and added additional sheaths to their phones during their commute to New York City

A woman doubled protection with gloves and a mask while traveling on a train in the Bronx on Monday

A woman doubled protection with gloves and a mask while traveling on a train in the Bronx on Monday

A woman doubled protection with gloves and a mask while traveling on a train in the Bronx on Monday

A man with a protective mask is seen on a metro network during his commute on Monday in Manhattan

A man with a protective mask is seen on a metro network during his commute on Monday in Manhattan

A man with a protective mask is seen on a metro network during his commute on Monday in Manhattan

On mainland China, where the virus first exploded, more than 80,000 people have been diagnosed and more than 58,000 have recovered so far.

Government and transit officials have emphasized that the virus cannot easily be transmitted through accidental contact, such as sharing a subway car with someone who is infected.

But they have also urged people to walk or cycle to go to work, to telecommute or to spread their working hours so that they do not drive during peak times.

The latter strategy was also used by the city during the 1918 flu epidemic.

The MTA is the largest transit system in the country and operates the city’s subways and buses alongside the Long Island Rail Road and MetroNorth rail systems that extend to the tip of Long Island and north to New Haven, Connecticut.

The agency has accelerated its cleaning activities to disinfect hundreds of metro and train stations and thousands of buses, subways and railcars.

MTA chairman and CEO Pat Foye said on Monday that more than 4,000 subways, 2,500 trains, and 5,300 buses were cleaned over the weekend.

“I want to assure the public that the metro is safe,” he said.

Andrew Cuomo from New York joked last week that riders should not be alarmed if they smell a strange chemical odor on the subways in the coming weeks.

‘It’s not a bad odor or perfume; it’s bleach, “Cuomo said.

Some New Yorkers (shown in Manhattan) cycled to work on Tuesday to avoid using the subways

Some New Yorkers (shown in Manhattan) cycled to work on Tuesday to avoid using the subways

Some New Yorkers (shown in Manhattan) cycled to work on Tuesday to avoid using the subways

This commuter chose to use his bike instead of his Metro card during the rush hour of New York City on Tuesday in Manhattan

This commuter chose to use his bike instead of his Metro card during the rush hour of New York City on Tuesday in Manhattan

This commuter chose to use his bike instead of his Metro card during the rush hour of New York City on Tuesday in Manhattan

Similar train cleaning measures have been taken in other large cities affected by the outbreak.

Like New York, Japan has insisted on flexible working hours to reduce overcrowding on trains.

Italy has added hand disinfectant dispensers to trains run on state railways before restricting residents in parts of the country where the contamination rate is highest.

In Seoul, South Korea, legions of workers in protective suits and safety goggles sprayed subway station with disinfectant.

At some train stations, civil servants also use heat detection cameras to search for people who may have a fever.

Spokespersons for the Washington, DC, Metro and the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority, serving Philadelphia and the suburbs, said the rider ship level did not seem to have been affected by virus-related concerns.

Uncertainty remains about which contact level can be dangerous.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the virus can spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes and the drops are inhaled by someone nearby.

It can also be picked up by touching an infected surface or object and then touching the mouth or nose, although the CDC says this is not the most important way the virus can spread.

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