New York prisoners on hunger strike after being refused due to lack of staff in the middle of closure & # 39;

Federal prisoners are waiting for a lawsuit in New York and have refused their meals after they have refused their visits to their families and lawyers due to staff shortages aggravated by the partial closure by the government, lawyers said Tuesday.

David Patton, the head of the New York federal defense office, said a hunger strike had taken place on at least one unit of the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan, a facility with approximately 800 detainees. But it was not clear when the hunger strike started or that it was going on.

"When the government starts prosecuting and detaining people, they have to do it in a constitutional way and that includes access to lawyers and adequate medical care," Patton said. & # 39; This is not happening at the moment. & # 39;

Federal prisoners are waiting for a lawsuit in New York and have refused their meals after they have refused their visits to their families and lawyers due to staff shortages. The head of the federal defense office said the strike had taken place on at least one unit in the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan

Federal prisoners are waiting for a lawsuit in New York and have refused their meals after they have refused their visits to their families and lawyers due to staff shortages. The head of the federal defense office said the strike had taken place on at least one unit in the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan

The US Bureau of Prisons said Tuesday in an e-mail that it had suspended the visitation at a facility & # 39; but that it has since been resumed & # 39 ;.

The office did not respond to a hunger strike in the Metropolitan Correctional Center, which was reported Monday by The New York Times, but said there was no strike at the Federal Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn.

It said that visit was contained in the Brooklyn lockup because of "problems with the elevators."

However, it appeared from the publication that this week at the facility, which told 1600 detainees from the lawyer of Bureau of Prisons, Adam Johnson, that there was a staff shortage.

The Brooklyn jail had been shut down for a few hours or completely shut down for seven days in January, according to an e-mail from federal New York defenders to federal supreme judges in Manhattan and Brooklyn.

The Times said Monday that visits were canceled for a second week at the Manhattan facility, where white prisoners were being held, including drug lord El Chapo.

The US Bureau of Prisons said there was no strike at the Metropolitan Federal Detention Center in Brooklyn, but said visitation was shortened because of "problems with elevators & # 39;

The US Bureau of Prisons said there was no strike at the Metropolitan Federal Detention Center in Brooklyn, but said visitation was shortened because of "problems with elevators & # 39;

The US Bureau of Prisons said there was no strike at the Metropolitan Federal Detention Center in Brooklyn, but said visitation was shortened because of "problems with elevators & # 39;

& # 39; They have already refused a meal – I believe they have refused breakfast and lunch & # 39 ;, told the federal public defender, Sarah Baumgartel, to the publication. & # 39; My client is in the unit, he joins in. & # 39;

It was claimed that the staff shortage had also affected recreational time, as well as access to doctors and medicines.

A prosecutor said last week during a hearing that they & # 39; were aware & # 39; and & # 39; had no reason to dispute this – that there are problems with drug prescription due to stalling.

Patton said the prisons were already suffering from staff shortages, but added that a higher number than the usual number of correctional officers report ill because they did not receive wage checks during the longest governmental arrest in American history.

The head of the federal defense office, David Patton, said that the personnel issues were aggravated by the partial closure by the government and that correctional officers reported sick because they had not received paychecks

The head of the federal defense office, David Patton, said that the personnel issues were aggravated by the partial closure by the government and that correctional officers reported sick because they had not received paychecks

The head of the federal defense office, David Patton, said that the personnel issues were aggravated by the partial closure by the government and that correctional officers reported sick because they had not received paychecks

& # 39; They rely heavily on, even in normal financial times, on staff to make overtime, & # 39; Patton said. & # 39; For understandable reasons, if people are not paid, they will not make overtime. & # 39;

Correctional officers across the country face a similar situation. Two correctional officers filed a lawsuit against the government last week in Washington D.C. claiming that they were forced into "involuntary duty" & # 39 ;.

& # 39; It gets worse every day, & # 39; said Michael Kator, the officer's lawyer. & # 39; It goes so far that it is untenable. & # 39;

The government has acknowledged the pressure on employees, but asked for more time to respond to the lawsuit.

Sabrina Shroff, a federal defender, asked a federal judge in New York Tuesday to give one of her clients another three weeks to surrender to serve three months' imprisonment, citing to the confusion caused by the closure in her request

Sabrina Shroff, a federal defender, asked a federal judge in New York Tuesday to give one of her clients another three weeks to surrender to serve three months' imprisonment, citing to the confusion caused by the closure in her request

Sabrina Shroff, a federal defender, asked a federal judge in New York Tuesday to give one of her clients another three weeks to surrender to serve three months' imprisonment, citing to the confusion caused by the closure in her request

Defense lawyers said they are considering new bail requests on the basis of deteriorating conditions.

Sabrina Shroff, a federal defender, asked a federal judge in New York Tuesday to give one of her clients another three weeks to surrender to serve three months' imprisonment, citing to the confusion caused by the closure of her request.

Patton – whose office represents thousands of defendants – wrote to the chief judge of the federal court in Manhattan, Colleen McMahon, about the possibility of making new bail requests on the basis of the problems.

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