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New York lawmakers are considering banning tackling football for children under 12 years of age after a Boston University study that children who tackle football can develop cognitive problems (stock image)

New York lawmakers consider a ban on football under 12 years after Boston University research has linked the sport to lagging brain development

  • New York is considering tackling a ban on football to protect children from brain damage
  • A hearing of the New York State Assembly was held on Tuesday morning in Brooklyn
  • Proponents of the ban warned that the game could hamper cognitive development
  • It is after the Boston University study has determined that the game can be harmful to children
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New York lawmakers are considering banning tackling football for children under 12 years of age after a Boston University study that children who tackle football can develop cognitive problems.

Proponents of the ban put forward their argument at a health committee of the New York State Assembly on Tuesday morning at 10 a.m. in Manhattan, with arguments about fear of brain damage and lagging cognitive growth in later life.

The proposed bill is named after John Mackey, a former Long Island NFL player who died in 2011 after developing chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) due to repeated head injury.

New York lawmakers are considering banning tackling football for children under 12 years of age after a Boston University study that children who tackle football can develop cognitive problems (stock image)

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New York lawmakers are considering banning tackling football for children under 12 years of age after a Boston University study that children who tackle football can develop cognitive problems (stock image)

The health committee heard doctors and other medical experts explain how the sport can be harmful to children.

A former college football player who suffered from early dementia was one of the voices calling for the ban.

Witnesses on Tuesday, T.J. Abraham, 42, now works as a doctor and said that his brain damage has significantly affected his career as a doctor and his daily life.

Dr. Chris Nowinski of the Concussion Legacy Foundation weighed during the hearing.

& # 39; I am shocked by the speed with which we have diagnosed former football players, including friends of mine, with degenerative brain disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE, & # 39; CBS New York quoted him as saying.

Opponents of the bill, including USA Football, insisted, however, that there was no convincing scientific argument.

The health committee heard doctors and other medical experts explain how the sport can be harmful to children (stock image)
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The health committee heard doctors and other medical experts explain how the sport can be harmful to children (stock image)

The health committee heard doctors and other medical experts explain how the sport can be harmful to children (stock image)

& # 39; The simple truth is that we don't know why some get CTE and others don't, & # 39; said Dr. Mark Herceg of the Phelps Concussion Program.

The proposed legislation still needs a senate sponsor and is not expected to be implemented in the near future.

A recent study by Boston University linked football to brain problems and discovered that playing football in young people can lead to an earlier onset of cognitive, behavioral and mood symptoms in later life.

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