WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

New York couple ONLY divorce in Manhattan during ’emergency’ coronavirus lockdown

New York couple get the ONLY divorce in Manhattan during coronavirus lock after judge determined it was an ’emergency’

  • Divorce attorney Morghan Richardson asked the judge to declare the divorce an emergency because it was related to an immigration issue
  • Judge Michael Katz agreed, declaring the case an essential matter
  • Katz worked from home, so she had to collect the papers from his doorman
  • The couple then became the only couple in Manhattan to receive a divorce while the city is locked
  • Here’s how you can help people affected by Covid-19

A New York City couple became the only divorce granted in Manhattan during the coronavirus lock on Wednesday after a judge decided that their split was an essential case.

The divorce judgment was signed by the district clerk on Wednesday after Manhattan judge Michael Katz signed an emergency request on May 13, according to court documents obtained by DailyMail.com.

The divorce of the unnamed couple was pushed through while the city’s legal system still operates largely remotely and on a limited capacity, handling only essential cases.

A New York City couple became the only divorce granted in Manhattan during the coronavirus lock on Wednesday after a judge signed their case into an emergency (file image)

A New York City couple became the only divorce granted in Manhattan during the coronavirus lock on Wednesday after a judge signed their case into an emergency (file image)

“My client was very much in a desperate situation, and this was a way to rectify that situation,” divorce attorney Morghan Richardson told the New York Daily News.

Richardson said her client ‘cried’ with relief after the divorce was granted because it was’ related to an immigration issue. If we hadn’t managed to get this divorce in, it would have had really serious consequences on her life. ‘

However, it is unclear what the immigration problem was related to.

Court records show that the couple’s divorce proceedings began in March, just before the city and state were under command of closure.

However, the final divorce papers could not be filed when the closure started.

Richardson then had to take the papers out of the judge's apartment and deliver them to the county registry at the downtown Manhattan courthouse (photo)

Richardson then had to take the papers out of the judge's apartment and deliver them to the county registry at the downtown Manhattan courthouse (photo)

Richardson then had to take the papers out of the judge’s apartment and deliver them to the county registry at the downtown Manhattan courthouse (photo)

Divorce lawyer Morghan Richardson (photo) had to pick up the original signed papers from the doorman of the judge's apartment

Divorce lawyer Morghan Richardson (photo) had to pick up the original signed papers from the doorman of the judge's apartment

Michael Katz (photo), a judge in Manhattan, was working from home at the time

Michael Katz (photo), a judge in Manhattan, was working from home at the time

Divorce lawyer Morghan Richardson (left) had to retrieve the original signed papers from the doorman of the judge (judge) of Michael Supreme, judge in Manhattan

To keep the process going, Richardson – spouse at Davidoff Hutcher & Citron LLP – took the unusual measure of asking the court to accept the documents in an emergency.

After going through the papers, Judge Katz – who worked at home – agreed to the divorce.

Richardson told DailyMail.com that because the county administrator needed the judge’s original signed document to finalize the case, she needed to find a way to get the signed paperwork and then deliver it to the office from the registrar in downtown Manhattan.

This led Richardson to drive to the judge’s house and collect his doorman’s paperwork.

“Which is probably the most bizarre event in my professional career – to drive to a judge’s house,” Richardson told New York Daily News.

The couple’s divorce was finalized on the same day New York’s chief administrator, Lawrence Marks, lifted the ban on nonessential lawsuits in New York counties.

From Monday, municipal courts will begin accepting non-urgent legal documents electronically – including lawsuits and divorces.

The resumption of non-essential procedures takes place two months after the city’s moratorium on all non-essential legal procedures. Litigation is expected to be backlogged.

“I think the New York divorce is pretty well known as a slow process, relatively speaking, and this has made it tremendously slower,” Richardson told the newspaper.

“The fact is that customers who are now waiting, even if things start over again, will experience a huge backlog. I expect it will slow down the process so much more, ”she added.

.

Comments
Loading...