Professor Dame Sally Davies used her appointment as UK Special Envoy on Antimicrobial Resistance to make an emotional plea for leaders to sit down and tackle the impending drug crisis

The new superug tsar of Great Britain tells of her fear that children will grow up in a & # 39; post-antibiotic apocalypse & # 39; unless urgent global action is taken to develop new medicines

  • Professor Dame Sally Davies spoke about a & # 39; return to the Middle Ages & # 39; of medicine
  • She said that Britain is sleepwalking in a superug crisis without viable drugs
  • Routine operations become life-threatening without antibiotics, she warned

Great Britain is sleepwalking in a & # 39; post-antibiotic apocalypse & # 39; who would see major setbacks in our ability to fight disease, the new superug tsar warned.

Professor Dame Sally Davies used her appointment as UK Special Envoy on Antimicrobial Resistance to make an emotional plea for leaders to sit up and tackle the impending drug crisis.

She painted a frightening photo of a & # 39; return to the dark age & # 39; health care if we continue to swallow existing antibiotics without finding a replacement.

Professor Dame Sally Davies used her appointment as UK Special Envoy on Antimicrobial Resistance to make an emotional plea for leaders to sit down and tackle the impending drug crisis

Professor Dame Sally Davies used her appointment as UK Special Envoy on Antimicrobial Resistance to make an emotional plea for leaders to sit down and tackle the impending drug crisis

Many of the current antibiotics are no longer effective because bacteria and viruses adapt to withstand their extinguishing power (stock image)

Many of the current antibiotics are no longer effective because bacteria and viruses adapt to withstand their extinguishing power (stock image)

Many of the current antibiotics are no longer effective because bacteria and viruses adapt to withstand their extinguishing power (stock image)

& # 39; We are using antibiotics and we will have an empty medicine cabinet if we no longer do it to tackle the problem & # 39 ;, she told Sunday Express.

& # 39; This is us crawling and people have not paid attention. & # 39;

Dame Sally, who leaves her post as Chief Medical Officer, said that the risk of death during routine operations increases when bacteria and viruses resist the extinguishing effect of current drugs.

She said: & # 39; If we don't find new antibiotics to replace the deficiencies, procedures such as caesarean sections, hip replacements, and cancer treatments may become life-threatening and transplant operations are a thing of the past. Modern medicine will be lost.

Dame Sally, who leaves her post as Chief Medical Officer, said that the risk of death during routine operations increases when bacteria and viruses resist the extinguishing effect of current drugs

Dame Sally, who leaves her post as Chief Medical Officer, said that the risk of death during routine operations increases when bacteria and viruses resist the extinguishing effect of current drugs

Dame Sally, who leaves her post as Chief Medical Officer, said that the risk of death during routine operations increases when bacteria and viruses resist the extinguishing effect of current drugs

The most dangerous superugs

The World Health Organization divides the threat of superbug strains into categories that are critical, high and average.

Of the bacteria that are critical & # 39; research and development are …

  1. Acinetobacter baumannii: This is resistant to carbapenems antibiotics and largely causes infections in hospitals such as pneumonia and blood infections.
  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Also resistant to carbapenems. Causes skin rashes, ear infections, pneumonia and serious blood infections.
  3. Enterobacteriaceae: Resistant to carbapenems and cephalosporins. Bacteria that proliferate in the gut and cause salmonella and E.coli.

In an emotionally charged battle cry against tackling the threat of superbugs on the agenda, Dame Sally spoke about her personal concerns about the crisis that is spilling over future generations.

She said: & I am losing sleep. If we do not take action now, we are really facing a terrible post-antibiotic apocalypse.

& # 39; I do not want to tell my children that I have not done my best to protect them and their children. & # 39;

Last April, a UN report stated that at least 700,000 people die worldwide as a result of resistant diseases, including 230,000 people who die from multi-resistant tuberculosis.

In response to the warning from Dame Sally, the director of the World Health Organization, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said: "We are at a critical point in the battle to protect some of our most essential medicines."

Health Secretary Matt Hancock has said that the UK is taking the global lead in tackling the threat of superbugs.

He said: & # 39; There is no greater threat to global health than drug resistant drugs, but since the 1980s there have been no major new antibiotic classes. & # 39;

He added: & # 39; Our NHS is in a unique position to play a leading role in testing new payment models. & # 39;

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