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FUSE (pictured above) is a motion tracking system that monitors movements of warehouse and factory workers using a device that snaps into a chest harness

New startup provides Walmart and Heineken with motion trackers to monitor warehouse workers in an effort to minimize work-related injury

  • Strongarm Technologies, a Brooklyn-based startup, has developed a monitoring device to help protect warehouse and factory workers
  • The device, called FUSE, is attached to a harness and monitors the movements of the worker
  • It will vibrate as a warning when an employee makes an unsafe move
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A Brooklyn technical startup has created a new motion tracking tool for factory and warehouse workers who, they say, help minimize workplace injuries.

The FUSE system, developed by Strongarm Technologies Inc, is a smartphone-sized sensor that is clipped into a harness worn by employees during a full shift.

The device follows their movements, including how far they bend, turn and how fast they rise.

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FUSE (pictured above) is a motion tracking system that monitors movements of warehouse and factory workers using a device that snaps into a chest harness

FUSE (pictured above) is a motion tracking system that monitors movements of warehouse and factory workers using a device that snaps into a chest harness

The device sends a vibration alert when it detects movements that may be unsafe.

The device records data twelve and a half times per second and performs general safety assessments, where an employee is classified as a low, medium or high risk of injury.

Strongarm claims that the devices have a margin of error that is less than five percent.

The idea came from Strongarm CEO Sean Patterson, whose father was killed in the workplace when Patterson was only 14.

The FUSE collects data about employees twelve and a half times per second to establish a general safety profile of individual employees, classifying them as low, medium or high injury risk & # 39; s

The FUSE collects data about employees twelve and a half times per second to establish a general safety profile of individual employees, classifying them as low, medium or high injury risk & # 39; s

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The FUSE collects data about employees twelve and a half times per second to establish a general safety profile of individual employees, classifying them as low, medium or high injury risk & # 39; s

The FUSE device vibrates vigorously to alert an employee when they are making unsafe movements

The FUSE device vibrates vigorously to alert an employee when they are making unsafe movements

The FUSE device vibrates vigorously to alert an employee when they are making unsafe movements

In an interview with Bloomberg, he said, "many, far too many things that could have happened that could have prevented that, if people were just more aware."

The company says it has more than 20 customers, including Walmart, Heineken and Toyota, and aims to have its devices used by 35,000 employees by the end of the year.

WHAT IS FUSE?

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The FUSE sensor is a smartphone-format motion tracker that is clicked into a harness worn by warehouse and factory workers.

It collects data about the movements of a warehouse or factory worker during the day and assigns it a safety ranking.

The sensor sends a warning vibration to the employee if it detects a movement that may increase the risk of injury.

FUSE was developed by the Brooklyn-based startup Strongarm Technologies.

Strongarm claims that FUSE is currently being used by 20 customers, including Walmart, Heinekn and Toyota.

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Strongarm encourages its customers to view workers as "industrial athletes" and pitch FUSE as something that a professional athlete could use to improve their performance.

& # 39; The device not only identifies when they do something risky & # 39 ;, COO Matt Norcia says in a demo video for the device, & # 39; we can use that data to identify the risks & # 39; s they come in contact with evaluate safety decisions and make them smarter and more precise. & # 39;

"We can also communicate why we make those decisions and essentially give them a dashboard of their performance and safety over time, in the same way that a coach can help a professional athlete."

Some employees were less than enthusiastic about using Strongarm's tracking equipment.

Adam Kaszynski, a trade union representative for IUE-CWA 201 and a former employee in a factor using Strongarm devices, did not like to follow all his movements at work.

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"I tried to convince everyone not to," Kaszynski told Bloomberg.

"It's creepy like hell. They have no business that knows that information. & # 39;

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