New report: College sports program & # 39; s cheat athletes from quality training

College sports programs & # 39; s cheat quality training athletes and treat them as money makers, a senator claims in a bomb report published Thursday and aimed at schools and the NCAA for turning a blind eye to an & # 39; broken system & # 39; .

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Sen. Chris Murphy accused in the university's & # 39; s college program report of not offering players the real value that he said should come with sports scholarships, instead giving more priority to the millions made on the playing field.

Players do not get real academic dreams due to insufficient educational opportunities, often never graduated, Murphy warns.

& # 39; The lack of academic integrity in college sports is perhaps the most insidious piece of a broken system & # 39 ;, he writes in the report, titled: & # 39; Madness Inc., how colleges athletes on the field and outside hold the class. & # 39;

Sen. Chris Murphy, a Democrat from Connecticut, says that players cannot realize true academic dreams due to insufficient educational opportunities, often never graduate

Sen. Chris Murphy, a Democrat from Connecticut, says that players cannot realize true academic dreams due to insufficient educational opportunities, often never graduate

& # 39; I was a major in football & # 39 ;, says Stephen Cline, a former defending lineman for Kansas State University

& # 39; I was a major in football & # 39 ;, says Stephen Cline, a former defending lineman for Kansas State University

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& # 39; I was a major in football & # 39 ;, says Stephen Cline, a former defending lineman for Kansas State University

Murphy, a Connecticut democrat, released the first part of the report earlier this year, which was critical of schools claiming that scholarships properly compensate players for their time on the pitch.

& # 39; The primary response of the NCAA to my first report was that students were compensated in their opinion. They believe that a scholarship is a sufficient compensation for all the time students spend and all the money they earn for the system & Murphy says Huffington Post.

& # 39; But there are many students who are part of the major university programs where schools treat them as commodities and do not give them the training they deserve. & # 39;

Stephen Cline, a former defending lineman at Kansas State University, says the school has discouraged him from using his scholarship to pursue his dream of becoming a veterinarian. Instead, Cline claims that he was forced to settle for a less demanding major so that he could concentrate on his entire reason for being at school: football.

"All the time … I felt stuck – stuck in soccer, stuck in my major," he said. & # 39; Now I look back and say: & # 39; Well, what am I really going to study for? & # 39; Crap lessons that you will not use for the rest of your life? I was a major in football. & # 39;

Jonathan Cruz, who attacked Oklahoma State University, said his academic advisors had completed courses for him and other athletes so that they could continue to qualify instead of focusing on real learning.

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& # 39; I would write them, and they would take them and just change everything about it, because it was just so awful, "he says. & # 39; I never really learned how to write a paper, but I had to draw a B in Comp I, and I drew my B in Comp I. & # 39;

Murphy says the NCAA fails to ensure that students receive adequate training in exchange for their game. Depicted are teammates congratulating on running back Tatum Bell from the Oklahoma State Cowboys

Murphy says the NCAA fails to ensure that students receive adequate training in exchange for their game. Depicted are teammates congratulating on running back Tatum Bell from the Oklahoma State Cowboys

Murphy says the NCAA fails to ensure that students receive adequate training in exchange for their game. Depicted are teammates congratulating on running back Tatum Bell from the Oklahoma State Cowboys

Murphy: & # 39; Due to the way the federal government traditionally measures graduation rates, schools are held responsible for those who drop out & # 39;

Murphy: & # 39; Due to the way the federal government traditionally measures graduation rates, schools are held responsible for those who drop out & # 39;

Murphy: & # 39; Due to the way the federal government traditionally measures graduation rates, schools are held responsible for those who drop out & # 39;

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In his report, Murphy argues that athletes are being cheated, especially if few have a quality diploma or no diploma at all.

He also accuses the NCAA of obscuring the problem with a method for measuring graduation grades that inflates the grades.

The & # 39; Graduation Success Rate & # 39; of the NCAA can blow up the school total because it credits the school when an athlete switches to another school with a good academic status. However, there is often no follow-up, so there is no way to tell how well students are doing at their new schools.

& # 39; The way the federal government traditionally measures graduation rates is that schools are held responsible for those who drop out, & Murphy tells HuffPost.

& # 39; But [the NCAA] has set its own degree of graduation, so that if a child may fall out of the program, no one is responsible for that child. And that is not measured in the tens. As we demonstrated in this report, there are thousands of children who dropped out of school prematurely who were exercising but were not included when it comes to graduation. & # 39;

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