New mother, 29, developed an infection of eating meat after childbirth

Fighter: Sophie Green refused to allow her ulcerative colitis to get in the way of her family's plans. After having her first child (pictured) in 2014, she ran a 5 km race to celebrate having more energy after her surgery. At that time, she was fighting a rare infection that corrodes the flesh

The inflammatory bowel disease is unbearable. Carrying a child and giving birth can also be. Suffering both is an overwhelming experience, to say the least.

But that was just the beginning of things for Sophie Green, 29.

The MRI technologist based in Newhaven, Connecticut, developed a relentless rectal bleeding during her first pregnancy due to ulcerative colitis.

After the birth, the doctors tried to suppress it with medicines, but finally it was forced to extract the colon, and have a stoma bag attached to contain your waste.

In the two weeks after that operation, the opening in the stomach where the stoma sac was attached had turned purple, and the tests revealed that he had contracted pyoderma gangrenosum, a condition that erodes the surrounding skin.

Eventually, the doctors controlled him, but failed to cure him, with episodes of steroid injections.

But even so, they were surprised when Sophie decided that she would not let him get in her way, and she conceived again, with her husband Tim.

The second pregnancy, in constant struggle against an infection of eating meat, was arduous.

However, now the mother of two healthy children, Sophie insists that everything was worth it, as she shares her story in an attempt to gather more research on pregnancy and digestive conditions.

Fighter: Sophie Green refused to allow her ulcerative colitis to get in the way of her family's plans. After having her first child (pictured) in 2014, she ran a 5 km race to celebrate having more energy after her surgery. At that time, she was fighting a rare infection that corrodes the flesh

Fighter: Sophie Green refused to allow her ulcerative colitis to get in the way of her family's plans. After having her first child (pictured) in 2014, she ran a 5 km race to celebrate having more energy after her surgery. At that time, she was fighting a rare infection that corrodes the flesh

Sophie and her husband Tim, who have been married since 2012 and live in Connecticut

Sophie and her husband Tim, who have been married since 2012 and live in Connecticut

Sophie and her husband Tim, who have been married since 2012 and live in Connecticut

Sophie had rectal bleeding during her first pregnancy due to her ulcerative colitis. After giving birth in 2014, the doctors tried to control him with steroids, but finally they had to remove his colon and place a stoma bag (pictured) to collect his waste. She then became pregnant again

Sophie had rectal bleeding during her first pregnancy due to her ulcerative colitis. After giving birth in 2014, the doctors tried to control him with steroids, but finally they had to remove his colon and place a stoma bag (pictured) to collect his waste. She then became pregnant again

Sophie had rectal bleeding during her first pregnancy due to her ulcerative colitis. After giving birth in 2014, the doctors tried to control him with steroids, but finally they had to remove his colon and place a stoma bag (pictured) to collect his waste. She then became pregnant again

Sophie had lived with trips to the hospital and abdominal pain since she was 16 years old.

In 2013, at age 24, shortly after marrying Tim Stevens, he decided he needed a colonoscopy, and was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis, an inflammatory bowel disease that feeds ulcers in the stomach, causing diarrhea, constipation, cramps, and fatigue. .

The oral steroids that your doctor prescribed did not help much to calm your symptoms, but a carefully constructed diet kept them at bay, without processed foods, without sugar, without gluten, without soy or corn.

"As a 16-year-old girl, I was very embarrassed by all this," she explained.

"In the worst of the phases, I was probably in the bathroom with diarrhea about 50 times a day and I fought not to vomit after every time I ate."

"I tried to hide it and I did not like to talk about what was suddenly going wrong with my body, and I was getting sicker and sicker.

"My parents helped me find ways to control my symptoms with my diet and I started taking some holistic supplements that helped me, by eliminating gluten from my diet, I stopped vomiting after eating, but the diarrhea persisted."

However, this derailed when she became pregnant with her first child in January 2014 with her husband.

Pregnancy began wonderfully, even banishing all your previous digestive problems.

"I felt incredible, I thought maybe pregnancy had healed me," she says.

But at 13 weeks that changed. She developed severe rectal bleeding, which persisted for three months.

Sophie before having her surgery to remove her colon

Sophie before having her surgery to remove her colon

Sophie before having her surgery to remove her colon

After Sophie had her colon removed, she developed a meat-eating disorder called pyoderma gangrenosum and needed regular appointments to inject steroids to prevent it from spreading.

After Sophie had her colon removed, she developed a meat-eating disorder called pyoderma gangrenosum and needed regular appointments to inject steroids to prevent it from spreading.

After Sophie had her colon removed, she developed a meat-eating disorder called pyoderma gangrenosum and needed regular appointments to inject steroids to prevent it from spreading.

Sophie shows her hernia before having a change of bag that she makes daily due to the autoimmune disease that she contracted

Sophie shows her hernia before having a change of bag that she makes daily due to the autoimmune disease that she contracted

At 37 weeks of pregnancy showing her infected stoma

At 37 weeks of pregnancy showing her infected stoma

Sophie (left) during her second pregnancy showing her hernia before having a bag change that she does every day due to the autoimmune disease she contracted. She is photographed (right) at 37 weeks of pregnancy showing her infected stoma

Eventually, doctors placed Sophie on steroids to prevent her from losing worrying amounts of blood.

Over time, she was weaned from the medication. Steroids are difficult for the body, and not something she would like to be permanently.

But even a slight reduction in its dose caused a sudden recrudescence of the symptoms once again.

This cycle continued until, in December 2016, his doctors said that the only viable way to end his pain would be to perform a total colectomy to remove the entire colon.

Instead, she had a stoma bag attached to her intestines.

After her operation, Sophie felt immediate relief and her pain disappeared.

Sophie's full-term pregnancy put a strain on her stoma and infected pyoderma gangrenous skin

Sophie's full-term pregnancy put a strain on her stoma and infected pyoderma gangrenous skin

Sophie's full-term pregnancy put a strain on her stoma and infected pyoderma gangrenous skin

A couple of weeks after their operation, the nurses who were changing Sophie's bag noticed an infection around the stoma where the skin had turned purple.

After the doctors followed this and reviewed it, Sophie was diagnosed with pyoderma gangrenosum, an autoimmune disease that eats the affected area of ​​the skin and forms ulcers.

The doctors tried to stop the spread of the disease with steroid injections in the area, which were successful, which allowed Sophie and her husband to try for their second baby.

In January of 2018, Sophie gave birth to a healthy baby, a second child for her and Tim.

But he struggled with his gangrenous pyoderma toward the end of his pregnancy.

"My gangrenous pyoderma was extremely painful towards the end of my second pregnancy," said Sophie.

"At 39 weeks we entered an induction to relieve the pressure on my skin since the ulcers were constantly getting worse.

"The bud is under my stoma, so with my growing belly I could not see my wound when I changed bags.

"I wish I could say that after giving birth my skin cleared up as we all expected, but it's not like that, it's gotten worse and worse, my body keeps tearing apart without thinking about stopping.

"The hardest part was seeing how the wound stretched over my belly and trying not to allow those days to spread affects the way I treat the people around me.

"Trying not to give in to the general discomfort of pregnancy with the additional pain of a wound in my belly was very difficult."

Recently, Sophie had to change her pouch every day at night to prevent infection of her gangrenous pyoderma.

Recently, Sophie had to change her pouch every day at night to prevent infection of her gangrenous pyoderma.

Recently, Sophie had to change her pouch every day at night to prevent infection of her gangrenous pyoderma.

Sophie immediately after her surgery to remove the colon. She said she resisted for a while while looking for other options, but finally discovered that it was the only way

Sophie immediately after her surgery to remove the colon. She said she resisted for a while while looking for other options, but finally discovered that it was the only way

Sophie immediately after her surgery to remove the colon. She said she resisted for a while while looking for other options, but finally discovered that it was the only way

Sophie recently bought a new ostomy belt for her stoma that is more comfortable after pregnancy

Sophie recently bought a new ostomy belt for her stoma that is more comfortable after pregnancy

Sophie recently bought a new ostomy belt for her stoma that is more comfortable after pregnancy

Sophie has shared her journey on Instagram to approach other victims and show the truthful truth of having a stoma.

"I had an overwhelmingly positive response to my story on Instagram," Sophie added.

& # 39; I decided to start sharing my story at the beginning of my first surgery. I wanted to encourage others in whatever they are fighting.

"I met such an incredible group of people who helped and supported me and I am very grateful for all the people with whom I have allowed myself to connect.

"Stomata and pyoderma gangrenosum are not very well understood by society, pyoderma gangrenosum is not a common condition and the medical community does not understand it very well.

"My condition has made me appreciate life much more … When you have bad days, you realize how good the good morning really is."

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