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New impetus to find the murderer of the 23-year-old who disappeared from a train station 30 years ago

Was Sarah murdered by a violent prostitute? New impetus to find murderer of 23-year-old who disappeared from a train station 30 years ago – with a sex worker at the top of the suspect list

  • Sarah MacDiarmid was last seen in July 1990 in a parking lot near a train station
  • The 23-year-old’s body was never found, and no one has ever been charged
  • Investigators have named the violent prostitute Jodie Jones as the prime suspect
  • Mrs. MacDiarmid’s family has refused to give up hope of discovering what happened
  • Her parents hope that the 30th anniversary of her disappearance can provide clues

Investigators believe that a hot prostitute may be responsible for the murder of a young woman who disappeared from a train station 30 years ago.

Sarah MacDiarmid was last seen walking through the parking lot at Kananook Train Station at her home in Frankston, Southeast Melbourne on July 11, 1990.

The Scottish-Australian woman was reported missing by her parents, and her blood was found the next day in the station parking lot.

Ms. MacDiarmid’s body has never been found, but police have found traces leading to nearby bushes.

A 1996 criminal investigation found that the 23-year-old was murdered by a mysterious person or people at around 10:20 PM that night.

Sarah MacDiarmid was last seen walking through the parking lot of Kananook train station in south east Melbourne in July 1990

Sarah MacDiarmid was last seen walking through the parking lot of Kananook train station in south east Melbourne in July 1990

Detectives call violent prostitute Jodie Jones (photo) the prime suspect

Detectives call violent prostitute Jodie Jones (photo) the prime suspect

Detectives call violent prostitute Jodie Jones (photo) the prime suspect

Detectives have named the violent prostitute Jodie Jones as the prime suspect and believe that Ms. MacDiarmid has been robbed and attacked by the sex worker and three others.

Jones and two of her alleged accomplices are dead, while the police meet the last woman in the group who survives.

They think she may have been involved in the removal of Ms. MacDiarmid’s body, but was not responsible for her murder.

Serial killer Paul Denyer and police killer Bandali Debs were considered suspects at some stage, but no one was ever charged.

Detective Inspector Andrew Stamper said The Herald Sun. Police urges anyone with information about Ms MacDiarmid’s death to report.

“There will definitely still be people who know what happened to Sarah and who is responsible. It’s been 30 years, but it’s not too late to do the right thing, ”he said.

The 23-year-old's car was found in the parking lot of Kananook Train Station (pictured at the time of her disappearance) after her parents reported her missing

The 23-year-old's car was found in the parking lot of Kananook Train Station (pictured at the time of her disappearance) after her parents reported her missing

The 23-year-old’s car was found in the parking lot of Kananook Train Station (pictured at the time of her disappearance) after her parents reported her missing

Ms MacDiarmid's blood (photo) blood was found near the parking lot of Kananook train station, with traces leading to the bushes

Ms MacDiarmid's blood (photo) blood was found near the parking lot of Kananook train station, with traces leading to the bushes

Ms MacDiarmid’s blood (photo) blood was found near the parking lot of Kananook train station, with traces leading to the bushes

“There are very few murders in which those involved have never spoken to anyone about it – someone will be aware of Sarah’s disappearance, and we’ll call on those people again to come forward and talk to the police.”

A $ 1 million reward is offered to those who can help the research.

Inspector Stamper said Ms. MacDiarmid’s family has refused to give up hope of finding out what happened to her.

“It’s hard to put that last bit of hope out, and families are left with every call, every knock on the door in case the one who gives them those answers,” he said.

Peter and Sheila MacDiarmid hope that the thirtieth anniversary of their daughter’s disappearance can provide new leads and a sense of closure after an ordeal that has ‘turned their lives upside down’.

MacDiarmid said that while several theories about his daughter’s fate had been offered in the three decades since 1990, they hoped the matter would be resolved.

“I don’t think the police are much wiser about the case right now – but the more publicity and the more help we can get, the better,” he said.

He added that the pain of her disappearance had never disappeared and continued to encourage the family to find answers.

“Some days you’re right, but some you think about it or hear something on TV about a family that has lost a loved one and it really touches you that your whole life has been turned upside down,” he said.

‘When new information comes through, it evokes emotions. Who knows what will pop up – but you have to look at it. ‘

Ms. MacDiarmid's parents Sheila and Peter have refused to give up hope of resolving the matter

Ms. MacDiarmid's parents Sheila and Peter have refused to give up hope of resolving the matter

Ms. MacDiarmid’s parents Sheila and Peter have refused to give up hope of resolving the matter

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