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The new species is believed to have been much larger than its more famous cousin, but only a single wing to the right of the bird has survived (photo)

Archeopteryx is generally considered to be the first bird to ever live, but it was not only in the air 150 million years ago.

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A rival has been found for the famous flying dinosaur, while archaeologists uncover the remains of a similar creature that may have been a better navigator in the sky.

It is thought to have been much larger than its more famous cousin, but only a single wing on the right of the bird has survived.

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The new species is believed to have been much larger than its more famous cousin, but only a single wing to the right of the bird has survived (photo)

The new species is believed to have been much larger than its more famous cousin, but only a single wing to the right of the bird has survived (photo)

The birds we see today are supposed to be descendants of carnivorous dinosaurs.

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The oldest known flying member of this tribe is Archeopteryx, which wore feathered wings, sharp teeth and a long bony tail.

Since its first fossil was found in 1861, Archeopteryx is the only bird-like dinosaur known from the Jurassic, the period between 199.6-145.5 million years ago.

However, it seems that this early bird may not have caught the worm alone.

Paleontologist Oliver Rauhut of the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich and geoscientific Christian Foth of the University of Friborg have reported the identification of a second bird-like dinosaur from the same period.

The animal that was called Alcmonavis poeschli, was excavated in the Schaudiberg quarry, near Mörnsheim, in the Altmühl valley in southern Germany.

Only a single wing on the right-hand side of the bird was preserved in the fossil, dating back to around 150 million years ago.

& # 39; We initially assumed that this was another copy of Archeopteryx & # 39 ;, said Professor Rauhut.

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& # 39; There are similarities, but after detailed comparisons with Archeopteryx and other geologically younger birds, the fossil remains suggest that we were dealing with a slightly more derivative bird, & # 39; he added.

& # 39; This suggests that the diversity of birds in the late Jurassic era was greater than previously thought. & # 39;

The birds we see today are supposed to be descendants of carnivorous dinosaurs. The oldest known flying member of this tribe is Archeopteryx, which wore feathered wings, sharp teeth and a long bony tail

The birds we see today are supposed to be descendants of carnivorous dinosaurs. The oldest known flying member of this tribe is Archeopteryx, which wore feathered wings, sharp teeth and a long bony tail

The birds we see today are supposed to be descendants of carnivorous dinosaurs. The oldest known flying member of this tribe is Archeopteryx, which wore feathered wings, sharp teeth and a long bony tail

Archeopteryx is generally considered to be the first bird to ever live, but it was not only in the air 150 million years ago. An Archeopteryx fossil has also been excavated from the same limestone unit as the new species, suggesting that the two creatures lived simultaneously

Archeopteryx is generally considered to be the first bird to ever live, but it was not only in the air 150 million years ago. An Archeopteryx fossil has also been excavated from the same limestone unit as the new species, suggesting that the two creatures lived simultaneously

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Archeopteryx is generally considered to be the first bird to ever live, but it was not only in the air 150 million years ago. An Archeopteryx fossil has also been excavated from the same limestone unit as the new species, suggesting that the two creatures lived simultaneously

An Archeopteryx fossil was also dug up from the same limestone unit as the new species, suggesting that the two creatures lived at the same time.

At the moment, southern Germany was covered with a shallow, sub-tropical sea interrupted by tree-speckled reef islands.

It exhibits many traits missing from Archeopteryx, but can be found with more recent birds, indicating that it is better adapted to active, flapping flights.

For example, Professor Rauhut said: & # 39; the wing muscles indicate greater flying power. & # 39;

The discovery has implications for the debate about where birds and their ancestors first developed an active flight as an adaptation of gliding
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The discovery has implications for the debate about where birds and their ancestors first developed an active flight as an adaptation of gliding

The discovery has implications for the debate about where birds and their ancestors first developed an active flight as an adaptation of gliding

The discovery has implications for the debate about where birds and their ancestors first developed an active flight as an adaptation of gliding.

& # 39; The adjustment shows that the evolution of the flight has progressed relatively quickly & # 39 ;, said Dr. Foth.

& # 39; The origins of birds and their flight have been heavily discussed in the field of evolutionary biology since the end of the nineteenth century, & quot; Rauhut said.

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The newly discovered fossils are both named after Alcmona, the old Celtic word for the Altmühl river and also for its discoverer, Roland Pöschl.

The full findings of the study were published in the journal eLife.

Alcmonavis poeschli, was excavated in the Schaudiberg quarry, near Mörnsheim, in the Altmühl valley in southern Germany

Alcmonavis poeschli, was excavated in the Schaudiberg quarry, near Mörnsheim, in the Altmühl valley in southern Germany

Alcmonavis poeschli , was excavated in the Schaudiberg quarry, near Mörnsheim, in the Altmühl valley in southern Germany

WHAT WOULD THE ARCHEOPTERYX VIEW DINOSAUR?

A raven creature that lived in southern Germany 150 million years ago was the & # 39; missing link & # 39; between dinosaurs and birds, according to a study by researchers at the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich.

Archeopteryx has been at the center since more than 150 years ago.

Some scientists claim that the creature was just another feathered dinosaur, but others say it was the first bird.

Artist & # 39; s impression of Archeopteryx. A new analysis of the oldest and most complete specimen ever found has shed new light on the enigmatic animal - and discovered it was somewhere between a dinosaur and a bird

Artist & # 39; s impression of Archeopteryx. A new analysis of the oldest and most complete specimen ever found has shed new light on the enigmatic animal - and discovered it was somewhere between a dinosaur and a bird

Artist & # 39; s impression of Archeopteryx. A new analysis of the oldest and most complete specimen ever found has shed new light on the enigmatic animal – and discovered it was somewhere between a dinosaur and a bird

Now an analysis of the oldest and most complete specimen ever found has shed new light on the enigmatic animal – and discovered it was somewhere in between.

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Experts believe that some features of Archeopteryx include:

  • Some aerodynamic skills based on its wings and feathers
  • Light colored feathers, possibly even white, with black ends.
  • It was a carnivore and may have eaten small reptiles, amphibians, mammals, and insects.
  • Probably grabbed small prey with only his jawsand may have used them to pin larger prey.
  • A full set of teeth (as opposed to live birds).
  • A flat breast bone (sternum) and abdominal ribs.
  • A long bony tail.
  • Three claws on the wing which could have been used to seize prey.

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