Nearly HALF of Jewish students say they or someone they know has been spat on

More than 40% of Jewish students say they or someone they know has been physically threatened for being Jewish, according to a new survey.

Respondents said they were spat at, had to pick up pennies, were “beaten up” by frats for being Jewish, a swastika carved into the door of a Jewish dorm, and a student union president who held a Jewish student told ‘all jewish men look alike and are ugly’.

DailyMail.com has obtained an exclusive copy of the shocking results of the poll of 506 American university students and alumni conducted by anti-bigotry organization Alums for Campus Fairness (ACF).

As many as 95% of Jewish students and recent graduates who answered the survey believed that anti-Semitism is a problem on their campuses.

Nearly 80% of Jewish students and recent graduates said they had been the target of abusive or threatening anti-Semitic comments or that they knew someone who was the target.

44% of students and recent graduates said either someone they know or they themselves had been physically threatened for being Jewish.

A new survey finds that more than 40% of Jewish students say they or someone they know has been physically threatened for being Jewish

The survey was conducted by anti-bigotry organization Alums for Campus Fairness (ACF)

The survey was conducted by anti-bigotry organization Alums for Campus Fairness (ACF)

The survey was conducted online between March 25 and June 14 of this year. It had 509 US respondents who were between the ages of 18 and 29 and identified themselves as Jewish current students or recent graduates of a four-year undergraduate degree program in the US.

Avi Gordon, executive director of the ACF, told DailyMail.com he was saddened but not surprised by the results of their investigation

Avi Gordon, executive director of the ACF, told DailyMail.com he was saddened but not surprised by the results of their investigation

The report also includes anonymous written descriptions from 137 respondents of their personal experiences with anti-Semitism on campus.

A 26-year-old man from a southeastern university wrote: “Pennies have been thrown at me by people saying, ‘Are you going to pick up that Jew?’

A current female student, 20, at a Midwestern university said: “I was having a conversation with a man in my dorm room and when I said I was Jewish, he joked about gassing me and when I explained that it was hurtful and it wasn’t funny he spat on me.’

A Midwestern graduate, 28, said, ‘I was an RA [resident advisor] for living life. Someone carved a swastika in my door… The person in charge was never caught.’

Another recent graduate student from the southeastern US said his fraternity brothers had been “jumped” because they were Jewish.

“3 of my fraternity brothers were walking home from the bars one night and right in front of their house they were jumped and beaten up by members of another fraternity just for being Jewish,” the 23-year-old wrote in the survey.

Another 19-year-old student studying at a private northeast institution said, “I was called ak**eb***h and physically threatened.”

According to the survey, 69% of students and graduates say they have avoided certain places, events or situations at school because they are Jewish, and 62% of students who said they were the target of an anti-Semitic incident did not report it .

Avi Gordon, executive director of the ACF, told DailyMail.com he was saddened but not surprised by the results of their investigation.

The students in the survey reported stories of being spat on, told to pick up pennies, and

The students in the survey reported stories of being spat on, told to pick up pennies, and “beaten up” by frats

DailyMail.com has obtained an exclusive copy of the shocking results of the poll of 506 students and alumni of American universities

DailyMail.com has obtained an exclusive copy of the shocking results of the poll of 506 students and alumni of American universities

“We have anecdotal evidence of what’s going on, but no hard data to show the reality on the ground for students and recent alumni,” he said.

‘We wanted to be able to quantify that and understand what current students really think about the campus climate.

‘The research results are shocking, but they confirm these anecdotal experiences that we regularly hear from students.

“It’s disturbing, it’s unacceptable, and it shows how important our work is to turn the tide and make university boards understand that this is a problem that needs to be taken seriously and addressed immediately.”

Despite the high number of students who experience anti-Semitism on campus, 80% say they always or usually feel safe to identify as Jew on campus, while 20% say they rarely or never do.

Some alumni wanted to distinguish between anti-Semitism and legitimate criticism of the Israeli government and its foreign policy, including the conflict with Palestine.

“Many reasonable people I interacted with and learned from (both students and teachers) do not support the Israeli occupation of Palestine,” wrote a 26-year-old Midwestern graduate.

“Anti-Semitism is a big problem worldwide, but I don’t feel it is more pronounced on college campuses than elsewhere.

“I think lack of support for Israel is often confused with anti-Semitism and that’s a shame.”

Other respondents said the faculty was also responsible for anti-Semitism on campus and acted with impunity.

In 2018, the office of Columbia University professor Elizabeth Midlarksy in New York City was vandalized with swastikas.  Midlarksy, who is Jewish, is also a leading Holocaust researcher

In 2018, the office of Columbia University professor Elizabeth Midlarksy in New York City was vandalized with swastikas. Midlarksy, who is Jewish, is also a leading Holocaust researcher

“Professor was incredibly anti-Semitic (Jews did 9/11; Jews own the media, etc.),” ​​wrote a 25-year-old female graduate of a northeastern university.

Friend and I filed a 30-page report (and met with) multiple deans about his anti-Semitism. We received a 1.5 page letter stating that we misinterpreted his comments and that he did nothing wrong. Then they offered him a position.”

“I often have to hide that I’m Jewish to fit in so my professors can like me,” wrote a current 22-year-old college student in Mid West.

“Leaving students’ voices heard is so important,” Gordon told DailyMail.com. ‘I think many feel marginalized on campus at the moment.

“Anti-Semitism is something that is ignored or left out in many administrations. They point to their robust study abroad program with a partner university in Israel or whatever, which is great, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t a problem on campus.

“Companies need to take this threat seriously. This is not just a minor problem or transient. Governments must fully support Jewish students on campuses.’

A copy of ACF’s report on their research can be found at: https://www.campusfairness.org/survey/.

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