Nearly Half of American Families Banned Monopoly From Game Nights Because of Fighting

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Just too fake! Nearly Half of American Families Banned Monopoly From Their Game Nights Because of Fights Over Cheaters and Sore Losers

  • One in five people have had to banish a board game for good because of a scuffle
  • Hasbro’s Monopoly takes up most of the bans at 44 percent
  • UN and sorry! are the next two most expelled
  • Board game manager says cooperative games, where players work in teams, can relieve negative emotions
  • Eleven percent of people have seen a physical fight break out during a match

Nearly half of American families have banned Monopoly from their game nights to keep the fun from turning into a fight.

That’s according to a recent survey by OnePoll, which found that one in five people has put away a board game at home after putting up with too many skirmishes and sore losers.

The most banned of all is Hasbro’s Monopoly, whose metal battleships and top hats have been tucked into closets by 44 percent of respondents.

Monopoly leads the pack of banned games, with 44 percent of people who have had to take a game out of rotation opting for the iconic Hasbro real estate game (file photo)

TOP 5 MOST FORBIDDEN BOARD GAMES

Monopoly – 44 percent

UN – 37 percent

Sorry! – 27 percent

Scrabble – 25 percent

Jenga – 24 percent

OnePoll conducted the survey of 2,000 people for Z-Man Games, best known for its collaborative board game Pandemic.

Twenty percent of respondents said their game nights are “often or always” disrupted by competitive or unfriendly behavior.

The most common outbursts are someone quitting because they lose (46 percent), someone accusing another player of cheating (44 percent), and two or more players getting into an argument (44 percent).

Only 22 percent of people have had to ban a particular game and another 22 percent have had to ban a specific player.

Thirteen percent of people admit that they are the problem ‘most’ or ‘every time’.

“Competition brings out the best in some people, but the worst in others,” said Justin Kemppainen, director of brand management at Z-Man Games. “This can manifest in minor ways, such as low-level grumbling and sulking during gameplay, but it can turn into yelling and arguing, which can ruin a gaming experience.”

That was the case for 11 percent of respondents, who say they witnessed a physical fight.

Kemppainen recommends looking beyond competitive games to more collaborative games.

A recent survey by OnePoll found that one in five people have put away a board game at home after putting up with too much scuffle and sore losers

A recent survey by OnePoll found that one in five people have put away a board game at home after putting up with too much scuffle and sore losers

“Sitting on the same team and fighting a common enemy in a cooperative game can create a sense of shared triumph in victory or shared mourning in defeat,” Kemppainen said. “Better yet, any negative emotions are directed at inanimate cardboard instead of people!”

Researchers also found some significant differences between ages.

Seventy-one percent of boomers over age 57 say they’re “never the problem,” compared to 57 percent of Generation Xers, 38 percent of Millennials, and 24 percent of Generation Zers.

Nearly half of boomers prefer to play one-on-one, while Gen Zers much more prefer working in teams (38 percent).

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