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A study by the University of Surrey has shown that no less than half of all flights are not considered particularly important by the traveler (stock)

Nearly half of all flights are taken by the people they take & # 39; unimportant and meaningless & # 39; deemed

  • Researchers have studied more than 500 flights in five years
  • Found that almost half had a level of unimportant
  • Air travel is one of & # 39; the world's leading contributors to global warming
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Air travel and an increasing number of flights contribute to climate change with fewer flights, an easy way to reduce the CO2 footprint.

And a new study from the University of Surrey has shown that as many as half of all flights are not experienced as particularly important by travelers.

International researchers looked at more than 500 flights of a total of more than 21.36 million miles and asked people to assess how important each flight was.

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A study by the University of Surrey has shown that no less than half of all flights are not considered particularly important by the traveler (stock)

A study by the University of Surrey has shown that no less than half of all flights are not considered particularly important by the traveler (stock)

A total of 58 percent received the label & # 39; very important & # 39; (37 percent) or & # 39; important & # 39; (21 percent), while the rest were somewhat unimportant.

The remaining three categories were & # 39; not important or unimportant & # 39 ;, & # 39; limited interest & # 39; and & # 39; no interest at all & # 39 ;.

Thirty-seven percent, 13 percent and eight percent of flights were subdivided into these areas respectively.

Researchers from the University of Lund, the University of Otago and the University of Oxford say that 21 percent can be considered superfluous and the admission of the flyers themselves (stock)

Researchers from the University of Lund, the University of Otago and the University of Oxford say that 21 percent can be considered superfluous and the admission of the flyers themselves (stock)

Researchers from the University of Lund, the University of Otago and the University of Oxford say that 21 percent can be considered superfluous and the admission of the flyers themselves (stock)

Huge CO2 footprint from Harry and Meghan & # 39; s travels to the Mediterranean

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Harry and Meghan & # 39; s journey to Nice was estimated at slightly more than a CO2 footprint three tons.

The private jet generated an estimated seven times the emissions per person compared to a commercial flight.

This was on top of them Ibiza trip this month that was believed to have a footprint of more than four tons.

It is estimated that this has emitted around six times more carbon dioxide per person than a scheduled flight.

The CO2 footprint of an average person in the UK is 13 tonnes per year.

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A tree removes about seven tons of carbon dioxide from the air once it is fully grown – meaning that Harry and Meghan would technically have to plant one tree to compensate for their carbon footprint, just after their two journeys this month.

Researchers from the University of Lund, the University of Otago and the University of Oxford say that 21 percent can be considered superfluous.

The research followed a group of international students at the University of Lund who together recall 587 flights over a period of six years (2012-2017).

The study, published in the Journal of Air Transport Management, also found the most popular motive for travel & # 39; leisure & # 39; with 42 percent.

Professor Stefan Gössling said: “We have asked active air travelers rigorous questions about the necessity of air travel, and our findings suggest that to reduce emissions associated with air travel, immediate measures must be taken to reduce unnecessary air travel made by the traveler. considered unnecessary.

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& # 39; Therefore, ensuring that flight costs include the environmental costs of flying is an important and immediate priority. & # 39;

A recent trend has emerged to condemn and embarrass people who regularly fly and receive the term "flygskam".

This movement has been boosted by protests against the extinction uprising, Greta Thunberg & # 39; s condemnation of world leaders at the UN climate summit in New York recently and the frivolous spending on private rays of high-profile figures.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) sciencetech (t) climate change – & – global-warming