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NATO will face up to Chinese ‘challenge’ for the first time at summit today

NATO will face China’s growing ‘challenge’ for the first time today, as leaders present a new long-term alliance plan at a summit in Spain.

Defense ministers meeting in Madrid will call Beijing “a challenge to our interests, our security and our values” in strategy papers setting out priorities for the next 10 years, marking the first time it has been mentioned by the Russia-oriented group.

NATO head Jen Stoltenberg said Moscow will remain a top priority as the Allies increase forces in Eastern Europe from 40,000 to 300,000, but added that “other threats and challenges we need to address have not disappeared.”

Meanwhile, G7 leaders meeting in Germany were preparing to close their summit – which was also dominated by Russia – today with a joint statement condemning China’s ‘harmful’ trade practices, another sign of the changing times .

NATO head Jens Stoltenberg said the alliance agrees to address China's growing

NATO head Jens Stoltenberg said the alliance agrees to address China’s growing “challenge” for the first time in new strategy papers released today.

G-7 leaders conclude their summit in Germany with a statement condemning China's 'harmful' trade practices as a sign of shifting priorities

G-7 leaders conclude their summit in Germany with a statement condemning China’s ‘harmful’ trade practices as a sign of shifting priorities

World leaders will release “a collective statement, unprecedented in the context of the G7, recognizing the damage caused by China’s non-transparent, market-distorting industrial guidelines,” a US official said.

Meanwhile, in a conversation with the Financial Times ahead of the NATO meeting, Stoletnberg insisted the alliance does not see China as “an adversary.”

But, he added, “we need to consider the ramifications of China’s heavy investment in military capabilities, long-range nuclear weapons and efforts to take control of our critical infrastructure when we consider how we can ensure that NATO remains the most successful alliance in Europe. history.’

Beijing is investing heavily in new naval forces, including aircraft carriers and militarized island bases in a bid to project power in the South China Sea.

It also increasingly threatens Taiwan – an island nation that sees Beijing as a breakaway province, and which threatens to “reunite” Xi Jinping by force.

President Biden has indicated that competition with China in the eastern Pacific is his top priority, and has forged new alliances in the region to counter Beijing’s growing power there.

Refocusing NATO’s attention is part of the same effort, but it also reflects the fact that China and Russia are increasingly collaborating in the region — including conducting joint naval exercises there.

Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping, though not firm allies, have stepped up cooperation in recent months, with Beijing providing tactical support to Moscow's war in Ukraine (truce)

Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping, though not firm allies, have stepped up cooperation in recent months, with Beijing providing tactical support to Moscow’s war in Ukraine (truce)

NATO says Russia will remain its top priority as it increases the number of high-prepared troops in Eastern Europe from 40,000 to 300,000 (file image)

NATO says Russia will remain its top priority as it increases the number of high-prepared troops in Eastern Europe from 40,000 to 300,000 (file image)

Japan, which has recently come into conflict with Russia over a contentious island chain, will be invited to join the NATO summit despite not being a member as the dynamic power shift takes place worldwide.

Representatives from Georgia – which is locked in a frozen conflict with Russia – and Australia, New Zealand and South Korea – which are increasingly bumping into China – have also been invited.

Meanwhile, G7 leaders concluding a summit in Germany have agreed to push for a new set of sanctions against Russia over its war in Ukraine, including a possible price cap on oil exports, a ban on gold sales and punitive tariffs on other products.

The G7 countries, which generate nearly half of global economic output, want to increase pressure on Russia without fueling the already soaring inflation that is fueling tensions at home and devastating developing countries.

There is a “real risk” of multiple famines this year as the war in Ukraine exacerbated the negative impact of climate crises and the COVID-19 pandemic on food security, United Nations head Antonio Guterres said last week.

The G7 will pledge up to $5 billion to improve global food security, the senior US official said, with the United States providing more than half that amount that would go to efforts to fight hunger in 47 countries and regional organizations. to fund.

The G7 has also reached a $5 billion deal to fight food insecurity caused by the war in Ukraine, as well as a new round of sanctions against Russia to punish Putin for launching the invasion.

The G7 has also reached a $5 billion deal to fight food insecurity caused by the war in Ukraine, as well as a new round of sanctions against Russia to punish Putin for launching the invasion.

Trying to rally emerging countries, many with close ties to Russia, to oppose Putin’s invasion of Ukraine, the G7 invited five major middle- and low-income democracies to the summit to win them over.

Some are more concerned about the impact of rising food prices on their populations, blaming Western sanctions, not Russia’s invasion of one of the world’s largest grain producers and blockade of its ports, for the shortages.

When asked whether G7 leaders had found a way to get Ukraine to export its grain, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Tuesday: ‘We are working on it, we are all working on it’.

G7 leaders have also agreed to take a more coordinated approach to challenge China’s “market-distorting” practices in global trade, the US official said.

“You will see leaders issue a collective statement, unprecedented in the context of the G7, recognizing the damage caused by China’s non-transparent, market-disruptive industrial guidelines,” the official said on Tuesday.

One of their pledges was to accelerate efforts to remove forced labour, including state-supported forced labour, from global supply chains, the official added.

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