National Trust creates 42 new Sherwood Forests

The National Trust has announced that it will plant huge tracts of forest at its locations – in the latest win for the Daily Mail tree planting campaign.

In the coming decade, no fewer than 20 million trees will be added to the charity’s land, creating the equivalent of 42 Sherwood forests.

It is only the last initiative announced since the Daily Mail launched its Be A Tree Angel campaign to plant thousands of trees throughout Great Britain.

Branching: the plan is to turn 44,000 hectares of National Trust farmland into forests by 2030. No less than 20 million trees will be added to charity over the next decade, creating the equivalent of 42 Sherwood Forests

Branching: the plan is to turn 44,000 hectares of National Trust farmland into forests by 2030. In the coming decade, no fewer than 20 million trees will be added to the land of the charity, creating the equivalent of 42 Sherwood forests

Currently, 60 percent of the National Trust’s land is agricultural land, mostly used for grazing cattle and sheep.

But 44,478 hectares – an area one and a half times the size of Manchester – will be transformed from agriculture to forest by 2030.

Up to 100 tenant farmers will voluntarily choose not to renew their permits by 2030 and the trust’s staff will plant up to £ 100 million by planting trees, including native oaks, ash, beech and plane trees, on the vacated land.

The charity, which takes care of the countryside, coasts, castles and stately homes, made the announcement yesterday on the occasion of its 125th birthday. The switch from farms to forests follows the growing demand from environmentalists for people to eat less meat, because farm animal emissions are bad for the planet.

The charity made the announcement yesterday on the occasion of its 125th birthday. Currently, 60 percent of the National Trust's land is agricultural land, mostly used for grazing cattle and sheep

The charity made the announcement yesterday on the occasion of its 125th birthday. Currently, 60 percent of the National Trust's land is agricultural land, mostly used for grazing cattle and sheep

The charity made the announcement yesterday on the occasion of its 125th birthday. Currently, 60 percent of the National Trust’s land is agricultural land, mostly used for grazing cattle and sheep

Hilary McGrady, director general of the trust, said: “Trees have endless benefits. They capture and store carbon, offer houses for all kinds of nature, help prevent flooding and form the backdrop for great adventures. We will seek the help of volunteers and the public in the coming years to help us express our ambition through tree planting events and other activities.

“We can’t do it alone and that’s why we’re happy to support campaigns such as the Daily Mail’s Be A Tree Angel, which encourage people to make a difference to nature on their doorstep.” The trees, which are part of the use of trust to have ‘net zero’ carbon emissions by 2030, will mainly be planted, with some being able to ‘sow’ themselves through wind and pollination by animals in wooded areas.

People gather at dawn at St Michael´s Tower at the top of Glastonbury Tor on Thursday to celebrate the National Trust anniversary. The trust will also follow the carbon impact of visitors arriving by car at its sites

People gather at dawn at St Michael´s Tower at the top of Glastonbury Tor on Thursday to celebrate the National Trust anniversary. The trust will also follow the carbon impact of visitors arriving by car at its sites

People gather at dawn at St Michael´s Tower at the top of Glastonbury Tor on Thursday to celebrate the National Trust anniversary. The trust will also follow the carbon impact of visitors arriving by car at its sites

Approximately one-eighth of the Trust’s farmland will be converted into forest, planted and laid out as close as possible to the villages and towns so that people can visit them. Woodland will increase from 10 to 17 percent of its land within ten years.

This is based on recommendations from an independent body of the Committee on Climate Change, which said that by 2050 the forest cover should have increased from 13 to 17 percent of British territory.

Corrieshalloch Gorge in Scotland, one of the most spectacular waterfalls in the UK. The staff of the trust will plant up to £ 100 million trees, including native oak, ash, beech and plane tree, on the vacated land

Corrieshalloch Gorge in Scotland, one of the most spectacular waterfalls in the UK. The staff of the trust will plant up to £ 100 million trees, including native oak, ash, beech and plane tree, on the vacated land

Corrieshalloch Gorge in Scotland, one of the most spectacular waterfalls in the UK. The staff of the trust will plant up to £ 100 million trees, including native oak, ash, beech and plane tree, on the vacated land

The confidence, which is expected to have six million members this year, has already begun planting trees, recruiting volunteers, schools and community groups to restore the forest in the South Downs that was felled and plowed during the two world wars.

Confidence says the scheme will lock up 300,000 tons of carbon – the energy output of 37,000 homes per year. Other initiatives to assist confidence in achieving net zero emissions include maintaining peat areas that, like trees, also absorb and store carbon, invest in more renewable energy, and reduce the carbon footprint.

The Mail has given away more than 10,000 saplings, including oak, birch, conifers, willow, hazel and holly as part of our 'Be A Tree Angel' campaign

The Mail has given away more than 10,000 saplings, including oak, birch, conifers, willow, hazel and holly as part of our 'Be A Tree Angel' campaign

The Mail has given away more than 10,000 saplings, including oak, birch, conifers, willow, hazel and holly as part of our ‘Be A Tree Angel’ campaign

Guy Shrubsole, tree campaign at Friends of the Earth, said: “Growing billions of trees across the country, while reducing emissions, is one of the most important solutions to the climate crisis.

“The National Trust’s plans for planting trees are hugely exciting and we hope that more large landowners will pop up to create and maintain forests on their estates.”

The Be A Tree campaign, carried out with charity from The Tree Council, has received a huge boost since its launch at the end of November, with the Mail giving away thousands of holly, willow, oak and birch trees.

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