Nation mourns cooking guru and one of the most influential Australians Margaret Fulton ever

The iconic famous chef who brought the taste buds of Australia to a new era and made the pressure cooker popular at the age of 94.

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Margaret Fulton's status as a national treasure was confirmed by her 1968 cookbook, The Margaret Fulton Cookbook – which sold more than 650,000 copies in ten years.

The author and cooking guru is credited with teaching Australians how to cook, and encourages them to develop their post-war taste buds beyond meat and potatoes.

Iconic famous chef Margaret Fulton, who brought Australia's taste buds to a new era and made the pressure cooker popular, died at the age of 94 (photo shows her daughter Suzanne, 11, some ways to prevent waste while cooking and save money in 1961)

Iconic famous chef Margaret Fulton, who brought Australia's taste buds to a new era and made the pressure cooker popular, died at the age of 94 (photo shows her daughter Suzanne, 11, some ways to prevent waste while cooking and save money in 1961)

The author and cooking guru is credited with teaching Australians how to cook, and encourages them to develop their post-war taste buds beyond meat and potatoes

The author and cooking guru is credited with teaching Australians how to cook, and encourages them to develop their post-war taste buds beyond meat and potatoes

The author and cooking guru is credited with teaching Australians how to cook, and encourages them to develop their post-war taste buds beyond meat and potatoes

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Fulton, whose death was announced Wednesday, also made her name a role in the introduction of the pressure cooker in Australia.

The status of Margaret Fulton as a national treasure was confirmed by her 1968 cookbook, the Margaret Fulton cookbook - which sold more than 650,000 copies in 10 years

The status of Margaret Fulton as a national treasure was confirmed by her 1968 cookbook, the Margaret Fulton cookbook - which sold more than 650,000 copies in 10 years

The status of Margaret Fulton as a national treasure was confirmed by her 1968 cookbook, the Margaret Fulton cookbook – which sold more than 650,000 copies in 10 years

She was offered a job to sell pressure cookers after the Second World War, which was inspired by old saucepans left over from the aircraft industry.

It was her next career – as a food writer for Women's Day – that enabled her to gain the necessary experience to bring distant kitchens to the Australian dining table.

& # 39; It was that era of expansion, so countries and airlines invited you all over the world. I have had five or six two-month visits to some fantastic locations, & she said The age in 2003.

She also played in an edition of Women & # 39; s Weekly from May 1956 after giving a four-day demonstration of French food in Sydney.

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The Italian cookbook was published in 1973 and the cook was praised for the practicality of her recipes, as well as the fact that she herself had gone to Italy and had seen the food first hand.

& # 39; When I first discovered and wrote spaghetti recipes, men told their wives: & # 39; That was very nice, honey, but what do we eat? & # 39; she said.

In 1983 she wrote her other celebrated book, Margaret Fulton's Encyclopedia of Food and Cookery, which was intended as a collection of her life's work and recipes.

Fulton (pictured here with her granddaughter Kate Gibbs) whose death was announced Wednesday, also made her name a role in the introduction of the pressure cooker in Australia

Fulton (pictured here with her granddaughter Kate Gibbs) whose death was announced Wednesday, also made her name a role in the introduction of the pressure cooker in Australia

Fulton (pictured here with her granddaughter Kate Gibbs) whose death was announced Wednesday, also made her name a role in the introduction of the pressure cooker in Australia

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In the same year she received the Medal of the Order of Australia for her contribution to journalism and cookery books.

Fulton continued to focus on teaching hearty, cost-effective meals, even in her later life – deploring the fast-food culture of Australia in a 1997 interview for the Australian Biography project.

& # 39; I am so sorry to just pick something up at the fast food store, & # 39; she said.

Fulton continued to focus on teaching hearty, cost-effective meals, even in her later life - deploring Australia's fast food culture in a 1997 interview for the Australian Biography project (pictured next to Marie Bashir, center and Kylie Kwong, left, in 2014 on the launch of a new stamp from Australia)

Fulton continued to focus on teaching hearty, cost-effective meals, even in her later life - deploring Australia's fast food culture in a 1997 interview for the Australian Biography project (pictured next to Marie Bashir, center and Kylie Kwong, left, in 2014 on the launch of a new stamp from Australia)

Fulton continued to focus on teaching hearty, cost-effective meals, even in her later life – deploring Australia's fast food culture in a 1997 interview for the Australian Biography project (pictured next to Marie Bashir, center and Kylie Kwong, left, in 2014 on the launch of a new stamp from Australia)

Her granddaughter Kate Gibbs, also a chef, said on Wednesday that the family is in mourning. Fulton is shown as the third from the left during a performance on Masterchef
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Her granddaughter Kate Gibbs, also a chef, said on Wednesday that the family is in mourning. Fulton is shown as the third from the left during a performance on Masterchef

Her granddaughter Kate Gibbs, also a chef, said on Wednesday that the family is in mourning. Fulton is shown as the third from the left during a performance on Masterchef

Margaret Fulton arrives at the InStyle and Audi Women of Style Awards in 2012 with her granddaughter Kate Gibbs

Margaret Fulton arrives at the InStyle and Audi Women of Style Awards in 2012 with her granddaughter Kate Gibbs

Margaret Fulton arrives at the InStyle and Audi Women of Style Awards in 2012 with her granddaughter Kate Gibbs

Denk Think a bit about how easy it is to cook, it does more than just provide the family with a nutritious good meal.

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& # 39; As if you were saying to one of the little girls while she was shooting the peas: & # 39; How was school? & # 39; and she tells you. It is a kind of interconnection. & # 39;

In 2006, Fulton was named as one of the 100 most influential Australians ever.

& # 39; The original house goddess of Australia & # 39 ;: the life and times of Margaret Fulton

1924: Born in Scotland

1927: Emigrated with parents to Glen Innes, New South Wales

1947: Started as a cooking teacher at the Overseas Corporation

1956: Featured in Women & # 39; s Weekly after giving a four-day demonstration of French food in Sydney

1968: Margaret Fulton Cookbook published

1983: Published Encyclopaedia of Food and Cookery and won the Medal of the Order of Australia

2006: Named as one of the 100 most influential Australians ever

2019: Died at the age of 94

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Her granddaughter Kate Gibbs, also a chef, said on Wednesday that the family is in mourning.

& # 39; The Margaret Fulton family today mourns the loss of their loving, inspiring and cherished mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother, & # 39; she told Delicious.

& # 39; They will release a statement in due course. Respect for their privacy at the moment is greatly appreciated. & # 39;

In 2006, Fulton (pictured in 2002) was named as one of the 100 most influential Australians ever

In 2006, Fulton (pictured in 2002) was named as one of the 100 most influential Australians ever

In 2006, Fulton (pictured in 2002) was named as one of the 100 most influential Australians ever

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