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NASA’s new spacecraft will approach 26 MILES of the sun to collect data

NASA has a new mission on the horizon that will take the first images of the north and south poles of the sun.

In collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA), the team is launching the Solar Orbiter that will use the gravity of Venus and Earth to leave the ecliptic plane, the area of ​​space aligned with the equator of the Sun, where all the planets orbit.

From this position, the ship will delight your eyes with the first look of the huge yellow dwarf star, which will provide scientists with better data to predict solar storms with greater precision.

Solar Orbiter is equipped with a custom designed titanium thermal shield coated with a specific phosphate that resists temperatures over 900 degrees Fahrenheit, allowing it to reach 26 miles from the scorching sun.

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Solar Orbiter (art print) will delight your eyes with the first look of the massive yellow dwarf star, which will provide scientists with better data to predict solar storms more accurately

Solar Orbiter (art print) will delight your eyes with the first look of the massive yellow dwarf star, which will provide scientists with better data to predict solar storms more accurately

Space agencies will launch the spacecraft on February 7, 2020 at 11:15 pm EST from Cape Canaveral, Florida.

Russell Howard, a space scientist at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C. and principal investigator of one of the ten instruments of the Solar Orbiter, said: ‘Until the Solar Orbiter, all solar imaging instruments have been within or near the ecliptic plane.’

‘Now, we can look at the Sun from above.’

The mission will last seven years, in which the Solar Orbiter will first reach 24 degrees above the equator of the Sun, increase to 33 degrees after three years and then end with a step within 26 of the sun.

Scientists study the sun's magnetic field to predict when solar storms will occur, which interfere with our GPS and communications satellites; In the worst case, they can even threaten astronauts. However, there have been gaps in the data due to the lack of information about the star's poles.

Scientists study the sun's magnetic field to predict when solar storms will occur, which interfere with our GPS and communications satellites; In the worst case, they can even threaten astronauts. However, there have been gaps in the data due to the lack of information about the star's poles.

Scientists study the sun’s magnetic field to predict when solar storms will occur, which interfere with our GPS and communications satellites; In the worst case, they can even threaten astronauts. However, there have been gaps in the data due to the lack of information about the star’s poles.

Scientists study the sun’s magnetic field to predict when solar storms will occur, which interfere with our GPS and communications satellites; In the worst case, they can even threaten astronauts.

However, there have been gaps in the data due to the lack of information about the star’s poles.

Holly Gilbert, a NASA project scientist for the mission at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, said: “The poles are particularly important for us to model more accurately.”

Solar Orbiter (artistic impression) will pass into the orbit of Mercury and will bring with it more advanced instruments.

Solar Orbiter (artistic impression) will pass into the orbit of Mercury and will bring with it more advanced instruments.

Solar Orbiter (artistic impression) will pass into the orbit of Mercury and will bring with it more advanced instruments.

“To forecast space weather events, we need a fairly accurate model of the Sun’s global magnetic field.”

NASA and ESA joined forces to explore the sun in 1990.

They launched the Ulysses that made three passes around the sun, but could not get closer than the distance from Earth to the sun.

He also only had sports technology that measures only the environment immediately around the spacecraft.

The Solar Orbiter, on the other hand, will pass into the orbit of Mercury and bring more advanced instruments.

Teresa Nieves-Chinchilla, deputy scientist of the NASA project for the mission, said: ‘We will be able to map what we’ play ‘with the instruments in situ and what’ we see ‘with remote sensing.’

Solar Orbiter is NASA’s second spacecraft to investigate the interior sun, following the Parker solar probe that was launched in August 2018.

Space agencies will launch the spacecraft on February 7, 2020 at 11:15 p.m. EST from Cape Canaveral, Florida

Space agencies will launch the spacecraft on February 7, 2020 at 11:15 p.m. EST from Cape Canaveral, Florida

Space agencies will launch the spacecraft on February 7, 2020 at 11:15 p.m. EST from Cape Canaveral, Florida

In collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA), the team is launching the Solar Orbiter (artistic impression) that will use the gravity of Venus and Earth to leave the ecliptic plane, the area of ​​space aligned with the equator of the Sun, where all orbit of the planets

In collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA), the team is launching the Solar Orbiter (artistic impression) that will use the gravity of Venus and Earth to leave the ecliptic plane, the area of ​​space aligned with the equator of the Sun, where all orbit of the planets

In collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA), the team is launching the Solar Orbiter (artistic impression) that will use the gravity of Venus and Earth to leave the ecliptic plane, the area of ​​space aligned with the equator of the Sun, where all orbit of the planets

This mission completed four nearby solar passes and will fly four million miles from the Sun at the closest approach.

The two spacecraft will work together: as Parker samples solar particles closely, Solar Orbiter will capture images from farther away, contextualizing observations. The two spaceships will also line up occasionally to measure the same magnetic field lines or solar wind currents at different times.

“We are learning a lot with Parker, and adding Solar Orbiter to the equation will only bring even more knowledge,” said Nieves-Chinchilla.

WHAT IS THE SOLAR PARKER PROBE OF NASA?

The Parker solar probe (PSP) traveled seven times closer to the sun than any previous spacecraft.

The Parker solar probe (PSP) traveled seven times closer to the sun than any previous spacecraft.

The Parker solar probe (PSP) traveled seven times closer to the sun than any previous spacecraft.

NASA’s Parker (PSP) solar probe will travel seven times closer to the sun than any spacecraft before its mission ends.

It was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket on August 12, 2018.

The probe flew to the outer atmosphere of the sun to study the life of the stars and their climatic events.

It is hoped that the PSP can help scientists better understand solar eruptions: brief eruptions of intense high-energy radiation from the surface of the sun that can disrupt communications on Earth.

Over the next five years, the probe will continue to make new discoveries as it approaches the Sun, and finally gets closer in 2024, as it flies 3.9 million miles above the solar surface.

The ship faces extremes in heat and radiation and will reach speeds of up to 430,000 miles per hour (700,000 kph) on its closest overflight of the star.

The ship’s kit includes a white light imager called Whisper, which will take images of solar waves as the ship drives them at high speeds.

To measure the ‘bulk plasma’ of solar winds, described by NASA as the ‘bread and butter’ of flares, a set of magnetic imaging equipment will also be stored on board.

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