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NASA’s cursed mission to the moon Artemis 1 hoped to launch late September

NASA now hopes to launch the cursed Artemis 1 mission to the moon in late September after previous attempts were scrapped TWICE due to technical issues, including a fuel leak

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The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) cursed Artemis 1 mission is now set to launch in late September after two previous attempts were delayed by significant technical issues.

NASA is looking to Sept. 23 and 27 as possible dates for its next attempt to launch its Artemis 1 mission to the moon, senior official Jim Free told reporters on Thursday.

Two previous attempts were scrapped after the giant Space Launch System rocket experienced technical problems, including a fuel leak.

“The 23rd is a 6:47 a.m. window that’s open for 80 minutes, and the 27th is an 11:37 a.m. window with a 70-minute duration,” said Free, associate administrator of the Reconnaissance Systems Development Directorate of the United States. desk.

NASA's cursed Artemis 1 mission is expected to launch in late September after two previous attempts were delayed by significant technical issues

NASA’s cursed Artemis 1 mission is expected to launch in late September after two previous attempts were delayed by significant technical issues

The dates were chosen to avoid conflict with the DART (Double Asteroid Redirection Test), in which a probe will hit an asteroid on September 26.

However, the launch dates are subject to NASA receiving a special waiver to avoid having to retest batteries on an emergency flight system used to destroy the missile if it strays from its designated range into a populated area.

If it doesn’t receive the waiver, the rocket will have to be wheeled back to its assembly building, pushing the timeline back by several weeks.

Mike Bolger, exploration ground systems manager, added that teams were in the process of replacing seals to fix the hydrogen leak problem — work that could be completed by late Thursday, paving the way for a tank test on Sept. 17.

two previous attempts were scrapped after the giant Space Launch System rocket experienced technical problems, including a fuel leak

two previous attempts were scrapped after the giant Space Launch System rocket experienced technical problems, including a fuel leak

two previous attempts were scrapped after the giant Space Launch System rocket experienced technical problems, including a fuel leak

NASA is looking to September 23 and 27 as possible dates for the next attempt to launch its Artemis 1 mission to the moon, senior official Jim Free told reporters on Thursday.

NASA is looking to September 23 and 27 as possible dates for the next attempt to launch its Artemis 1 mission to the moon, senior official Jim Free told reporters on Thursday.

NASA is looking to September 23 and 27 as possible dates for the next attempt to launch its Artemis 1 mission to the moon, senior official Jim Free told reporters on Thursday.

NASA halted its latest launch attempt on Saturday because engineers were unable to fix a hydrogen fuel leak, which could not be fixed.

The previous failed attempt was because engineers were unable to cool one of the rocket’s engines to a safe temperature for launch in time.

However, the long-delayed launch of the massive 30-story rocket — which should bring American boots to the lunar surface by 2025 — is about more than just solving mechanical problems.

“We’ll go when it’s ready,” NASA administrator Bill Nelson said after the most recent scrubbed launch.

“We’re not going to go on a test flight until then, and especially now, because we’re going to highlight this and test this, and test that heat shield, and make sure it’s good before we have four people on top of it.”

The Artemis 1 space mission hopes to test the SLS, as well as the unmanned Orion capsule sitting atop, in preparation for future lunar journeys with people on board.

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