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NASA video shows the crew’s view of Apollo 13 crew before they had to abort their mission in 1970

NASA video shows the crew’s view of the Apollo 13 crew before they had to abort their mission in 1970 due to an explosion aboard the ship

  • Apollo 13 would become NASA’s third mission to the moon, but an explosion aboard canceled the landing
  • A new video shows the crew’s view of the moon as it passed over the dark side and into the sunlight
  • The entire film shows the trajectory that NASA used to bring the crew back to Earth

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Apollo 13 was set as NASA’s third mission to the moon, but the crew had to give up their plans two days after the launch – but not before they had captured a stunning view of the moon’s surface.

New data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter recreates the views of the astronauts in a video that reveals the “dark side” of the moon in 4K resolution.

The two-minute clip opens in the dark to honor the crew who were in pitch black for eight minutes while sitting between earth and sunrise.

The sun then appears around the corner and reveals the majestic craters and pot places of the moon’s surface.

The world would have held its breath after Apollo 13 had undergone an explosion on its way to the moon in April 1970.

The explosion left the spaceship crippled and led to the famous “Houston, we had a problem” line from Commander Jim Lovell.

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The astronauts and mission control both had to contend with logistical problems in stabilizing the spacecraft and air supply, as well as supplying sufficient energy to the damaged fuel cells to successfully return to the Earth’s atmosphere.

The crew, including Lovell, Fred Haise and Jack Swigert, had to leave the main command module and use the Lunar landing module as a lifeboat to kiss back to Earth.

NASA had to recalculate the emergency procedures very quickly which they later forwarded to the crew.

Because the navigation equipment of the paralyzed spacecraft was not working properly, the commander used the earth as a reference point.

Apollo 13 was set as NASA's third mission to the moon, but the crew had to give up their plans two days after the launch - but not before they had captured a stunning view of the moon's surface

Apollo 13 was set as the third mission from NASA to the moon, but the crew had to give up their plans two days after the launch – but not before they had captured a stunning view of the moon surface

New data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mimics the views of the astronauts in a video that reveals the “dark side” of the moon in 4K resolution

The two-minute clip opens in the dark to honor the crew who were in pitch black for eight minutes while sitting between earth and sunrise. The sun then appears around the corner and reveals the majestic craters and pot places of the moon's surface

The two-minute clip opens in the dark to honor the crew who were in pitch black for eight minutes while sitting between earth and sunrise. The sun then appears around the corner and reveals the majestic craters and pot places of the moon's surface

The two-minute clip opens in the dark to honor the crew who were in pitch black for eight minutes while sitting between earth and sunrise. The sun then appears around the corner and reveals the majestic craters and pot places of the moon’s surface

If the vessel had pointed in the wrong direction at the time of the burn, the crew would probably have been shot in space without hope of correcting the course home.

In the video, NASA takes viewers for more than a minute around parts of the moon while music plays in the background – and then the earth appears.

NASA says this is the time when Apollo 13 has restored radio contact with Mission Control.

The video ends with the trajectory that the astronauts took around the moon to get home safely.

The crew, including Fred Haise (left), Jim Lovell (center) and Jack Swigert (right), had to leave the main command module and use the Lunar module moon landing as a lifeboat to kiss back to the coast.

The crew, including Fred Haise (left), Jim Lovell (center) and Jack Swigert (right), had to leave the main command module and use the Lunar module moon landing as a lifeboat to kiss back to the coast.

On April 17, the tragedy changed to triumph when Apollo's 13 astronauts landed safely in the Pacific Ocean.

On April 17, the tragedy changed to triumph when Apollo's 13 astronauts landed safely in the Pacific Ocean.

The crew, including Fred Haise (left), Jim Lovell (center) and Jack Swigert (right), had to leave the main command module and use the Lunar module moon landing as a lifeboat to kiss back to the coast. On April 17, the tragedy turned to triumph when the Apollo 13 astronauts landed safely in the Pacific

In the video, NASA takes viewers for more than a minute around parts of the moon while music plays in the background - and then the earth appears

In the video, NASA takes viewers for more than a minute around parts of the moon while music plays in the background - and then the earth appears

In the video, NASA takes viewers for more than a minute around parts of the moon while music plays in the background – and then the earth appears

Although stunning, the video does not show the true hardships that the crew suffered while their lives dangled through a thread. It took four days for NASA to bring the team to Earth. During this time they suffered from dehydration, ate little food, and fought against cold temperatures

Although stunning, the video does not show the true hardships that the crew suffered while their lives dangled through a thread. It took four days for NASA to bring the team to Earth. During this time they suffered from dehydration, ate little food, and fought against cold temperatures

Although stunning, the video does not show the true hardships that the crew suffered while their lives dangled through a thread. It took four days for NASA to bring the team to Earth. During this time they suffered from dehydration, ate little food, and fought against cold temperatures

Although stunning, the video does not show the true hardships that the crew suffered while their lives dangled through a thread.

It took four days for NASA to bring the team to Earth.

During this time they suffered from dehydration, ate little food, and fought against cold temperatures.

On April 17, the tragedy changed to triumph when Apollo’s 13 astronauts landed safely in the Pacific Ocean.

WHAT IS THE ‘DARK SIDE’ OF THE MOON?

The other side of the moon – popularly known as the dark side – actually receives just as much light as the near side, but always looks away from the earth.

The other side of the moon was first observed in 1959, when the Soviet spacecraft Luna 3 returned the first images.

In 1968, astronauts aboard the Apollo 8 spacecraft were the first people to turn their eyes on the other side while circling the moon.

Since then, various missions from NASA and other space agencies have depicted the furthest side of the moon.

The same applies to NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft, which in 2008 depicted an image from a distance of 31 million miles (49 km).

This relatively unexplored region is mountainous and rugged, making a successful landing much more difficult to achieve.

The Chang’e-4 mission from China, which landed in January 2019, was the first to surface.

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