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The huge tank is voltage tested at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. More than 200 feet long with a diameter of 27.6 feet, the test item of the liquid hydrogen tank is structurally identical to the flight version of the tank that will include two-thirds of the core step of the final SLS.

NASA has finally started testing the gigantic 200ft tank of its huge Space Launch System rocket.

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The huge liquid hydrogen tank stores cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen that will feed the four RS-25 engines of the vehicle when they are started.

SLS will produce 8.8 million lbs. of maximum thrust, 15 percent more thrust than the Saturn V rocket.

The huge tank is voltage tested at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

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The huge tank is voltage tested at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. More than 200 feet long with a diameter of 27.6 feet, the test item of the liquid hydrogen tank is structurally identical to the flight version of the tank that will include two-thirds of the core step of the final SLS.

The huge tank is voltage tested at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. More than 200 feet long with a diameter of 27.6 feet, the test item of the liquid hydrogen tank is structurally identical to the flight version of the tank that will include two-thirds of the core step of the final SLS.

THE EM-1 MISSION

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NASA & # 39; s Orion, stacked on a Space Launch System rocket capable of hoisting 70 tons, will be launched from 2020 in a newly renovated Kennedy Space Center.

The unscrewed Orion will travel to Far Retrograde Orbit, the distance record breaking achieved by the farthest Apollo spacecraft, and then 30,000 miles away (275,000 total miles).

The mission lasts 22 days and is designed to test system readiness for future manned operations.

More than 200 feet long with a diameter of 27.6 feet, the test item of the liquid hydrogen tank is structurally identical to the flight version of the tank that will include two-thirds of the core step of the final SLS.

It contains 537,000 gallons of supercooled liquid hydrogen at minus 423 degrees Fahrenheit.

Dozens of hydraulic cylinders in the 215-foot high test stand push and pull the tank, subjecting it to the same stresses and loads it will tolerate during takeoff and flying.

NASA says there will be different versions of the SLS, although they all use the core phase with four RS-25 engines.

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The first SLS vehicle, called block 1, can send more than 26 tons (t) or 57,000 pounds (lbs.) To orbits behind the moon.

The next planned evolution of the SLS, the Block 1B crew vehicle, will use a new, more powerful Exploration Upper Stage (EUS) to enable more ambitious missions and to transport the Orion crew vehicle along with exploration systems such as a deep space habitat module.

The huge tank is being moved to NASA & # 39; s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

The huge tank is being moved to NASA & # 39; s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

The huge tank is being moved to NASA & # 39; s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

The following SLS configuration, block 2, yields 11.9 million lbs. of thrust and will be the workhorse vehicle for sending cargo to the moon, Mars and other deep space destinations.

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SLS Block 2 is designed to lift more than 45 t (99,000 lbs.) Into the deep space.

NASA recently released an astonishing video of the moment the flood system dumps thousands of gallons of water on Launch Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center.

The first test launch of the Space Launch System rocket, which is intended to send people to the moon and ultimately enable deep space exploration, was recently planned for mid-2020

The space agency is preparing for the first trip of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket of $ 8.9 billion, which needs around 450,000 liters of water during ignition and launch to combat the extreme heat and acoustics.

WHAT IS THE SPACE OF NASA SYSTEM LAUNCHING?

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NASA's Space Launch System, or SLS, is an advanced launch vehicle that will form the basis for human reconnaissance outside the orbit, says the space agency.

Launches with unprecedented thrust and carries crews of up to four astronauts in the office's Orion spacecraft on missions to explore in-depth destinations.

By offering more mass, volume and energy to accelerate space missions than any launching instrument, SLS is designed to evolve over several decades to stay up to date with modern technologies and load capacities.

NASA's Space Launch System, or SLS, is an advanced launch vehicle that will form the basis for human reconnaissance outside the orbit, according to the space agency (artist's impression).

NASA's Space Launch System, or SLS, is an advanced launch vehicle that will form the basis for human reconnaissance outside the orbit, according to the space agency (artist's impression).

NASA's Space Launch System, or SLS, is an advanced launch vehicle that will form the basis for human reconnaissance outside the orbit, according to the space agency (artist's impression).

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These include robotic scientific missions to places such as the moon, Mars, Saturn and Jupiter.

The first launch of the rocket, which will be unmanned, is scheduled for 2019 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

The initial configuration for what SLS can perform on a low orbit around the earth and up to the moon is more than 26 metric tons, with a final configuration of at least 45 tons.

NASA plans to send people to & # 39; deep-space & # 39; destinations such as Mars and the moon aboard the SLS, with a date for a mission to the red planet set for the 2030s.

In this month's incredible wet-flow test, a flood of water can flush straight up into the air and flush across the complex before it diminishes into a trickle in just a matter of seconds.

The most recent wet-flow test, shown in the images above, was conducted on 15 October on the Launch Pad 39B of the Kennedy Space Center. In less than two minutes from start to finish, the system spits hundreds of thousands of gallons of water into the air, the stream climbing like a huge geyser to about 100 feet into the air

The SLS rocket increases with 8.4 million pounds of thrust, thanks to the four RS-25 engines and two solid rocket boosters.

NASA will use the deluge system to protect the rocket and everything that goes with it, including the Orion spacecraft, the Mobile Launcher and the launch pad itself.

The fast-moving water is poured out and sent to the launch platform to reduce & # 39; extreme heat and energy generated by a rocket launch & # 39 ;, NASA explains.

The space agency is preparing for the first trip of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket of $ 8.9 billion, which needs around 450,000 liters of water during ignition and launch to combat the extreme heat and acoustics. An artist & # 39; s impression of the SLS rocket that radiates is shown

The space agency is preparing for the first trip of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket of $ 8.9 billion, which needs around 450,000 liters of water during ignition and launch to combat the extreme heat and acoustics. An artist & # 39; s impression of the SLS rocket that radiates is shown

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The space agency is preparing for the first trip of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket of $ 8.9 billion, which needs around 450,000 liters of water during ignition and launch to combat the extreme heat and acoustics. An artist & # 39; s impression of the SLS rocket that radiates is shown

The latest wet-flow test was conducted on October 15 in the Kennedy Space Center launch platform 39B.

In less than two minutes from start to finish, the system spits hundreds of thousands of gallons of water into the air, the stream climbing like a huge geyser up to about 100 feet into the air.

NASA has released an astonishing video of the moment the flood system dumps thousands of gallons of water on Launch Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center

NASA has released an astonishing video of the moment the flood system dumps thousands of gallons of water on Launch Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center

NASA has released an astonishing video of the moment the flood system dumps thousands of gallons of water on Launch Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center

In this month's incredible wet-flow test, a flood of water can jump straight up into the sky
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In this month's incredible wet-flow test, a flood of water can jump straight up into the sky

In the video, hundreds of thousands of gallons of water are released across the complex before it falls to a trickle in a matter of seconds

In the video, hundreds of thousands of gallons of water are released across the complex before it falls to a trickle in a matter of seconds

In the incredible images of this month's wet flow test, one sees a flood of water flushing straight up into the air and flushing across the complex before it diminishes to a trickle in just a matter of seconds

These tests are critical preparations for the SLS launch for the safety of Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1) and future missions.

NASA conducted a similar test earlier this year, allowing them to identify any necessary issues and make changes to improve performance.

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When it is finally time for launch and all components are put in place, things look slightly different.

& # 39; A geyser occurred because the mobile launcher was not present on the pad & # 39 ;, Nick Moss, deputy project leader, explained the previous test.

& # 39; When the mobile launcher sits on its pad surface fastening mechanisms, the rest of the IOP / SS system is connected to the pad supply headers and the water flows through the supply lines and leaves it through the nozzles. & # 39;

HOW DOES NASA'S SPACE WORK UP THE ROCKET ROCKET SYSTEM?

Space Launch System, or SLS, is a launch vehicle that NASA hopes to bring its astronauts back to the moon and beyond.

The unmanned cargo flight of the huge rocket is currently scheduled for December 2019.

The rocket will have an initial lift configuration set to start in the mid-2020s, followed by an upgraded & # 39; evolved lift capacity & # 39; which can carry heavier payloads. Nasa has yet to set a timeline for the second iteration of SLS.

Space Launch System First lifting capacity

– Maiden flight: Mid-2020 & # 39; s

– Height: 311 feet (98 meters)

– Lift: 70 tons

– Weight: 2.5 million kilograms (5.5 million lbs)

Space Launch System Evolved Lift Capability

– Maiden flight: Unknown

– Height: 384 feet (117 meters)

– Lift: 130 tons

– Weight: 2.9 million kilograms (6.5 million lbs)

NASA's Space Launch System has an initial lift configuration (second from the right), set to start in the mid-2020s, followed by an upgraded & # 39; evolved lift capacity & # 39; (far right) that can perform heavier payloads

NASA's Space Launch System has an initial lift configuration (second from the right), set to start in the mid-2020s, followed by an upgraded & # 39; evolved lift capacity & # 39; (far right) that can perform heavier payloads

NASA's Space Launch System has an initial lift configuration (second from the right), set to start in the mid-2020s, followed by an upgraded & # 39; evolved lift capacity & # 39; (far right) that can perform heavier payloads

EM-1 is scheduled to take off in late 2019 or early 2020 in a non-screwed mission that will test critical systems for future missions with astronauts on board.

& # 39; This is a mission that will truly do what has not been done and learn what is not known & # 39 ;, said Mike Sarafin, EM-1 mission manager at NASA headquarters in Washington.

& # 39; It will radiate a trail that people follow on the next Orion flight and push the edges of the envelope to prepare for that mission. & # 39;

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