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Now only on Mars, the Curiosity rover took a moment to direct its electronic gaze to the horizon - to capture a creepy shot of one of the bare vistas of the red planet. Pictured, the rocky slopes of Central Butte in the foreground, with the edge of Gale Crater visible in the distance

NASA Curiosity Rover returns ghostly images of the barren, rocky landscape of Mars while searching for signs of life in the 96-kilometer-wide Gale Crater of the Red Planet

  • The rover has been investigating the impact crater of Mars since August 2012
  • It currently climbs the rocky foot of the mountain in the middle of the crater
  • Analyzing sedimentary rock layers can reveal clues about the watery past of Mars
  • Curiosity is all alone on the red planet after the Opportunity Rover broke out last year
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Now only on Mars, the Curiosity rover took a moment to direct its electronic gaze to the horizon – to capture a creepy shot of one of the bare vistas of the red planet.

The fearless robot – who has been investigating the Gale impact crater of Mars since August 2012 – studies the superficial rocks of Mars and looks for signs of life.

Curiosity is currently working its way up a slope of rock waste called the & # 39; Central Butte & # 39 ;, which lies at the foot of Aeolis Mons, the mountain in the center of Gale.

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Now only on Mars, the Curiosity rover took a moment to direct its electronic gaze to the horizon - to capture a creepy shot of one of the bare vistas of the red planet. Pictured, the rocky slopes of Central Butte in the foreground, with the edge of Gale Crater visible in the distance

Now only on Mars, the Curiosity rover took a moment to direct its electronic gaze to the horizon – to capture a creepy shot of one of the bare vistas of the red planet. Pictured, the rocky slopes of Central Butte in the foreground, with the edge of Gale Crater visible in the distance

The spooky image above was taken by Curiosity's right navigation camera on November 1, 2019 – or some NASA experts & # 39; Sol 2573 & # 39; dubbing.

One Sol is equal to one March Day – with Sol 0, at least for Curiosity, being the day the robber first landed the red planet.

On the horizon you can see the edge of the 96 mile (154 km) wide Gale crater, while the gentle slopes of Central Butte can be seen in the foreground.

By analyzing the layers of sedimentary rock around the Central Butte, Curiosity enables scientists to reveal clues about the nature of water in the region in the past.

& # 39; After all these observations, Curiosity will begin to drive around the butte to see it from the other side & # 39 ;, wrote planetary geologist Kristen Bennett of the United States Geological Survey on the NASA Mars Exploration Program website.

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& # 39; We expect a fantastic view of Central Butte at our next stop! & # 39;

The intrepid Curiosity rover, pictured - who has been investigating the Gale impact crater of Mars since August 2012 - is investigating Mars & surface rocks and looking for signs of life

The intrepid Curiosity rover, pictured - who has been investigating the Gale impact crater of Mars since August 2012 - is investigating Mars & surface rocks and looking for signs of life

The intrepid Curiosity rover, pictured – who has been investigating the Gale impact crater of Mars since August 2012 – is investigating Mars & surface rocks and looking for signs of life

Curiosity is currently climbing a slope of rock waste called the & # 39; Central Butte & # 39 ;, which lies at the foot of Aeolis Mons, the mountain in the center of Gale

Curiosity is currently climbing a slope of rock waste called the & # 39; Central Butte & # 39 ;, which lies at the foot of Aeolis Mons, the mountain in the center of Gale

Curiosity is currently climbing a slope of rock waste called the & # 39; Central Butte & # 39 ;, which lies at the foot of Aeolis Mons, the mountain in the center of Gale

& # 39; After all these observations, Curiosity will begin to drive around the butte to see it from the other side & # 39 ;, wrote planetary geologist Kristen Bennett of the United States Geological Survey on the NASA Mars Exploration Program website
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& # 39; After all these observations, Curiosity will begin to drive around the butte to see it from the other side & # 39 ;, wrote planetary geologist Kristen Bennett of the United States Geological Survey on the NASA Mars Exploration Program website

& # 39; After all these observations, Curiosity will begin to drive around the butte to see it from the other side & # 39 ;, wrote planetary geologist Kristen Bennett of the United States Geological Survey on the NASA Mars Exploration Program website

On the horizon you can see the edge of the 96-mile (154 km) wide Gale crater, while the gentle slopes of Central Butte can be seen in the foreground

On the horizon you can see the edge of the 96-mile (154 km) wide Gale crater, while the gentle slopes of Central Butte can be seen in the foreground

On the horizon you can see the edge of the 96-mile (154 km) wide Gale crater, while the gentle slopes of Central Butte can be seen in the foreground

Curiosity only became apparent in his exploration of the red planet in mid-2018, when his former companion, Opportunity, ceased to function.

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The second rover, which explored the plain of Meridiani Planum, located south of the Mars equator, got into a dust storm last June.

The storm prevented Opportunity's solar panels from supplying enough energy to maintain communication during the storm – but when the weather came, the rover failed to reconnect with its operators on earth.

NASA believes the rover suffered a catastrophic failure, or that a layer or dust from the storm covered its solar panels and prevented Opportunity from restarting.

Curiosity, pictured here in a & # 39; selfie & # 39 ;, became only in his exploration of the red planet in mid-2018, when his former companion, Opportunity, ceased to function

Curiosity, pictured here in a & # 39; selfie & # 39 ;, became only in his exploration of the red planet in mid-2018, when his former companion, Opportunity, ceased to function

Curiosity, pictured here in a & # 39; selfie & # 39 ;, became only in his exploration of the red planet in mid-2018, when his former companion, Opportunity, ceased to function

WHAT IS THE MARS CURIOSITY ROVER AND WHAT HAS IT DONE TODAY?

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The Mars Curiosity rover was initially launched from Cape Canaveral, an American air force station in Florida on November 26, 2011.

After traveling a 350 million mile (560 million km) journey, the £ 1.8 billion ($ 2.5 billion) research vehicle was only 2.4 miles away from the designated landing site.

After a successful landing on August 6, 2012, the rover has covered approximately 18 km.

It was launched on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft and the rover constituted 23 percent of the mass of the total mission.

With 80 kg (180 lb) of scientific instruments on board, the rover weighs a total of 899 kg (1,982 lb) and is powered by a plutonium fuel source.

The rover is 2.9 meters (9.5 ft) long by 2.7 meters (8.9 ft) wide by 2.2 meters (7.2 ft) in height.

The Mars curiosity rover was initially intended as a two-year mission to gather information to help answer if the planet could sustain life, has liquid water, studies the climate, and Mars geology has been active for more than 2,000 days since then.

The Mars curiosity rover was initially intended as a two-year mission to gather information to help answer if the planet could sustain life, has liquid water, studies the climate, and Mars geology has been active for more than 2,000 days since then.

The Mars curiosity rover was initially intended as a two-year mission to gather information to help answer if the planet could sustain life, has liquid water, studies the climate, and Mars geology has been active for more than 2,000 days since then.

The rover was initially intended as a two-year mission to gather information to help respond if the planet could sustain life, have liquid water, study the climate and geology of Mars.

Due to its success, the mission has been extended indefinitely and has now been active for more than 2,000 days.

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The rover has various scientific instruments on board, including the mastcam that consists of two cameras and can make high resolution images and videos in real colors.

So far on the journey of a car-sized robot, he has come across an old flow bed where liquid water used to flow, not long after it was discovered that billions of years ago a nearby area known as Yellowknife Bay was part of a lake that have supported the microbial life.

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