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Mr. Bridenstine stated in a recorded but not broadcast interview fragment that he still firmly believes that Pluto (photo) should be considered a legitimate planet

Pluto was relegated 13 years ago from the ninth planet to a dwarf planet – but a NASA expert refuses to accept the change.

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Jim Bridenstine revived the debate by stating that Pluto should be a planet because it has an ocean below its surface, organic connections on its surface and its own moons.

He also noted that if experts at or experts start to follow the true definition of a planet, which says it must clear its orbit around the sun, we could really undermine & # 39; all planets & # 39 ;.

This is the second time in just a few months that Bridenstine has argued for a recovery from the distant world with its original title.

& # 39; I am here to tell you, as a NASA administrator, that I believe Pluto should be a planet, & # 39; he said, to applaud during an extensive speech at the International Astronautical Congress in Washington D.C. Friday.

& # 39; Some people have argued that in order to be a planet you have to clear your orbit around the sun. & # 39;

& # 39; Well, what we now know is that if that is the definition we are going to use, you could really undermine all planets & # 39 ;.

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& # 39; They are all dwarf planets because there is no planet that makes its entire orbit around the sun. & # 39;

Scroll down for video & # 39; s

Pluto was relegated 13 years ago from the ninth planet to a dwarf planet - but a NASA expert refuses to expect the change. Jim Bridenstine revived the debate by stating that Pluto should be a planet because it has an ocean below its surface, organic connections on its surface and its own moons.

Pluto was relegated 13 years ago from the ninth planet to a dwarf planet – but a NASA expert refuses to expect the change. Jim Bridenstine revived the debate by stating that Pluto should be a planet because it has an ocean below its surface, organic connections on its surface and its own moons.

Bridenstine later responded to a question about his Pluto attitude by quoting the buried ocean, moons, complex organic compounds, and multi-layered atmosphere.

Jim Bridenstine (photo in August) has rekindled the debate by saying that Pluto must be a planet because it has an ocean beneath the surface, organic compounds on the surface and its own moons

Jim Bridenstine (photo in August) has rekindled the debate by saying that Pluto must be a planet because it has an ocean beneath the surface, organic compounds on the surface and its own moons

Jim Bridenstine (photo in August) has rekindled the debate by saying that Pluto must be a planet because it has an ocean beneath the surface, organic compounds on the surface and its own moons

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In 2006, the International Astronomical Union, a global group of astronomy experts, established a definition of a planet that requires its & # 39; orbit & # 39; & # 39; is being cleaned & # 39 ;, or the greatest gravity in its orbit.

The IAU used this to wake up the planet world and remove Pluto from the ranks of the elite bodies of the solar system, reducing the number of planets to eight.

Because the gravity of Neptune influences the neighboring planet Pluto and Pluto shares its orbit with frozen gases and objects in the Kuiper belt, this meant that Pluto no longer had planetary status.

But despite the official statement, many have never accepted it – and Bridensteine ​​is one of Pluto's die-hard supporters, and his last comment supports this.

In August he spoke during a tour of the Aerospace Engineering Sciences Building at the University of Colorado Boulder.

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& # 39; Just so you know that in my opinion Pluto is a planet, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; You can write that NASA administrator has declared Pluto a planet again. I'm sticking with it, it's the way I learned it, and I'm committed to it. & # 39;

It came on the 13th birthday of Pluto & # 39; s fall of grace and formal relegation to a & # 39; dwarf planet & # 39 ;.

WHY IS PLUTO NOT A PLANET?

In 2006, the International Astronomical Union, a global group of astronomy experts, established a definition of a planet that requires its & # 39; orbit & # 39; & # 39; is being cleaned & # 39 ;, or the greatest gravity in its orbit.

Because the gravity of Neptune influences the neighboring planet Pluto and Pluto shares its orbit with frozen gases and objects in the Kuiper belt, this meant that Pluto no longer had planetary status.

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Before 2006 there was never a formal definition of what formed a planet.

Scientists claim that this means that Pluto's demotion is unjust and unreasonable.

However, last year's study is one of the newest to add more robust support than the whimsical needs of NASA administrator.

Research from the University of Central Florida at Orlando claims that the reason Pluto lost its planet status & # 39; not valid & # 39; is.

It reviewed scientific literature from the past 200 years and found only one publication – from 1802 – in which the clearing orbit requirement was used to classify planets, and it was based on a reasoning proven since then.

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& # 39; The IAU definition would say that the fundamental object of planetary science, the planet, is supposed to be defined on the basis of a concept that nobody uses in their research & # 39 ;, said UCF planetary scientist Philip Metzger , affiliated with Florida of the university. Space Institute.

& # 39; And it would omit the second most complex, interesting planet in our solar system. & # 39;

Metzger said that moons such as Titan of Saturn and Europe of Jupiter have been routinely called planets by planetary scientists since the time of Galileo.

& # 39; We now have a list of more than 100 recent examples of planetary scientists using the word planet in a way that violates the IAU definition, but they do it because it is functionally useful. & # 39;

& # 39; It's a sloppy definition

& # 39; They didn't say what they meant by releasing their job. If you take that literally, there are no planets, because no planet makes its orbit. & # 39;

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