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Narelda Jacobs: ‘Cancel culture doesn’t exist; there is always redemption’

Native Studio 10 host Narelda Jacobs says cancellation culture doesn’t exist and there is always redemption for those who ‘harm marginalized people’

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Narelda Jacobs has weighed in on the culture of cancellation, saying it’s extremely rare for someone to be canceled for their views on “marginalized” groups because there is “always” an opportunity for them to apologize and move on.

The Indigenous TV host, 46, shared her thoughts on the topic on Wednesday after speaking with non-binary activist and poet Alok Vaid-Menon on Studio 10.

“No one is ever fired for harming marginalized people. There is always an opportunity to learn and change,” she wrote on Instagram.

Narelda Jacobs backs NRLW player Caitlin Moran over offensive Queen
Narelda Jacobs backs NRLW player Caitlin Moran over offensive Queen

Narelda Jacobs (pictured) says it’s rare for someone to get “cancelled” for their controversial views, because there’s “always” an opportunity to apologize and move on

Vaid-Menon, 31, an Indian-American queer transfemale artist who uses she/she pronouns, is currently in Australia for their speaking tour and The Festival of Dangerous Ideas, where they spoke at a presentation chaired by Jacobs.

During their Studio 10 interview, they explained how “most comedians have become ambassadors for the status quo” when they “should be advocating for change.”

“The truth is that a lot of people talk in comedy about cancellation culture, but the ultimate form of being canceled is killing, and that’s what marginalized people are dealing with,” Vaid-Menon said.

The Indigenous TV host, 46, shared her thoughts on the topic on Wednesday after speaking with non-binary activist and poet Alok Vaid-Menon (pictured) on Studio 10
The Indigenous TV host, 46, shared her thoughts on the subject on Wednesday after speaking to non-binary activist and poet Alok Vaid-Menon (pictured) on Studio 10

The Indigenous TV host, 46, shared her thoughts on the subject on Wednesday after speaking to non-binary activist and poet Alok Vaid-Menon (pictured) on Studio 10

They continued, “A lot of comics talk about punching or punching. I was beaten on a tram in Melbourne. It wasn’t a metaphor for me.

“And so we have to be very careful because at its core, comedy was really about championing change and now most comedians have become ambassadors for the status quo.”

Vaid-Menon holds a series of live shows across Australia, and will visit Perth on Wednesday before heading to Melbourne on Thursday.

“No one is ever fired for harming marginalized people.  There is always an opportunity to learn and change,
“No one is ever fired for harming marginalized people.  There is always an opportunity to learn and change,

“No one is ever fired for harming marginalized people. There is always an opportunity to learn and change,” Jacobs (left) wrote on Instagram

Their work explores themes of trauma, belonging and the human condition.

It comes after Narelda sparked a heated debate on social media after calling on the monarchy to apologize for the colonization of First Nations people following the death of Queen Elizabeth II.

Her request has received support from some progressive Australians, but also a response from Britons who feel they owe First Nations people no apology for the actions of their ancestors more than 200 years ago.

Vaid-Menon, 31, an Indian-American queer transfemale artist who uses pronouns, is currently in Australia for their speaking tour and The Festival of Dangerous Ideas, where they spoke at a presentation led by Jacobs (pictured)
Vaid-Menon, 31, an Indian-American queer transfemale performer who uses s/he uses pronouns, is currently in Australia for their speaking tour and The Festival of Dangerous Ideas, where they spoke at a presentation led by Jacobs (pictured)

Vaid-Menon, 31, an Indian-American queer transfemale artist who uses pronouns, is currently in Australia for their speaking tour and The Festival of Dangerous Ideas, where they spoke at a presentation led by Jacobs (pictured)

Others pointed out that Narelda is of Irish and English descent on her mother’s side, which makes her “as much British as native.”

Narelda’s late father Cedric was an Indigenous man and a member of the Stolen Generations, while her mother Margaret, who is white, migrated with her family from Northern Ireland to Australia.

However, many Australians congratulated Narelda for sharing her perspective.

1663726241 685 Narelda Jacobs Cancel culture doesnt exist there is always redemption
1663726241 685 Narelda Jacobs Cancel culture doesnt exist there is always redemption

During their Studio 10 interview, Vaid-Menon explained how “most comedians have become ambassadors for the status quo” when they “should be advocating for change”

Vaid-Menon is holding a series of live shows across Australia and will visit Perth on Wednesday before heading to Melbourne on Thursday
Vaid-Menon is holding a series of live shows across Australia and will visit Perth on Wednesday before heading to Melbourne on Thursday

Vaid-Menon is holding a series of live shows across Australia and will visit Perth on Wednesday before heading to Melbourne on Thursday

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