Mystery like hundreds of strange looking sea potatoes & # 039; washed up on a Cornish beach in massive strandings

<pre><pre>Mystery like hundreds of strange looking sea potatoes & # 039; washed up on a Cornish beach in massive strandings

Hundreds of strange-looking sea potatoes have appeared on a beach in Cornwall.

The orbs were full of garbage on a Wherrytown beach in Penzance, following the humid weather.

Rosie Hendricks noticed the "strange looking" creatures when she was walking in the sand today with her daughter, sister and nephew.

Hundreds of strange-looking marine potatoes have been washed on a beach in Cornwall

Ms. Hendricks of Penzance said, "I was not sure what they were," adding that she had never seen anything like this before, the Sun reported.

The mysterious-looking orbs are, in fact, a common species of hedgehog known as the marine potato.

They are related to starfish and the proof of a sea potato is distinctively heart-shaped, giving them their common name of hedgehog heart.

Generally 6-9 cm in diameter, they have an impressive half-life of 10-20 years and can be observed throughout the year throughout the United Kingdom.

The Wildlife Trusts says on its website: "The Sea Potato is a medium-sized sea urchin that lives buried in sandy and muddy seabeds on all coasts of the United Kingdom.

& # 39; Lives in a burrow between 8 and 15 cm deep and can be found buried in beaches and at the bottom of the sea at depths of 200 m.

The orbs were full of garbage on a Wherrytown beach in Penzance, following humid weather

Rosie Hendricks noticed the "strange looking" creatures when she was walking in the sand today with her daughter, sister and nephew

It feeds on debris collected inside its burrow using its tubular feet.

When it is alive, it is covered with fine beige spines that give it a hairy appearance. Often, the empty test (shell) is washed on the ground and is white and brittle.

The discovery arises when Cornwall struggles to cope with the tourism that has brought the heat wave.

Visit Cornwall, the county tourism board, has actively stopped promoting two beaches, the Porthcurno beach and the Kynance cove, due to problems caused by overpopulation.

Malcolm Bell of Visit Cornwall told the BBC: "No one wants to see this type of mass tourism affecting the area, affecting the tourist experience and obstructing the roads."

The finding comes when Cornwall "struggles to cope" with the tourism that the heat wave has brought

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