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Mysterious Viking inscription reveals the warrior nation that feared climate change

Mysterious Viking inscription reveals the warrior’s feared climate change and a return of the deadly ‘Late Antique Little Ice Age’ that has destroyed more than the HALF of Scandinavia

  • Rök stone is littered with more than 700 mysterious rune inscriptions
  • What the stone is talking about is a much-discussed topic for many Viking experts
  • New analysis claims it describes the fear of a parent and the fear of climate change

A famous Viking relic, known as the Rök stone, tells of the paralyzing fear of a heartbreaking parent that the cold weather that has robbed their child of life can return, experts say.

New analysis of the mysterious runic inscription claims it speaks of a lengthy struggle against extremely cold weather in the sixth century.

It is known that more than half of all Scandinavians died in the sixth and seventh centuries because the cold temperatures caused widespread destruction.

Experts have long been blown away by the 8.5-meter high stone, most of which theories claim to be a dedication to the legendary Ostrogoth King, Theodore the Great.

More than 700 runes cover its five sides and experts have missed its true meaning because parts of the rock are missing or worn.

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New analysis of the mysterious rune inscription (photo) on the Rok Stone claims that it mentions a lengthy fight against extremely cold weather in the sixth century

New analysis of the mysterious rune inscription (photo) on the Rok Stone claims that it mentions a lengthy fight against extremely cold weather in the sixth century

WHAT IS THE SKIRT STONE?

The Rök Runestone is one of the most famous runestones in the world, with the longest known rune inscription in stone, composed of about 760 characters.

It is considered the first piece of written Swedish literature and is reportedly carved by a Viking named Varin.

The stone was discovered in the 19th century, built into the wall of the church that was built in the 12th century.

The stone was built in the late 800s near Lake Vattern in south-central Sweden and mentions the Norwegian hero Theodoric.

It was thought that the stone contained a lost piece of Norwegian mythology and refers to the Ostrogoth king, Theodoric the Great.

But many missing sections and different languages ​​mean that the true inscription has long escaped researchers.

Some academics now believe it refers to a brutal period of prolonged cold weather in the 6th and 7th centuries, called the “late antique small ice age,” where more than 50 percent of Scandinavia died due to failed crops and famine.

The stone was built in the late 800s near Lake Vattern in south-central Sweden and mentions the Norwegian hero Theodoric.

Some people think that this is a reference to Theodoric the Great, a ruler from the sixth century of the Ostrogoths in modern-day Italy.

But this claim has been refuted by some experts, with Professor Holmberg of the University of Gothenburg publishing research in 2016 that “the idea that Rök Runestone mentions that Gothic Emperor Theodoric is based on a minor reading error and a large part of nationalistic wishful thinking “.

While the efforts to decipher the true meaning of writing continue, a team of experts from three Swedish universities now think that it is completely talking about another topic.

Instead of telling travelers with stories about a great warrior who has ruled all over Europe, the Rök Stone is believed to speak of a parent’s fear of losing his child during a period that is now the “Late Antique Little Ice Age” is called ‘.

“The inscription is about a fear caused by the death of a son and the fear of a new climate crisis similar to the catastrophic crisis after 536 CE,” the authors write in the study published in Futhark: International Journal of Runic Studies.

WHO WAS THEODORICALLY BIG?

Theodoric the Great is known as one of the founders of Medieval Europe, together with Clovis.

He was an Ostrogoth who grew up as a prisoner in the large city of Constantinople.

He developed an affinity with the emperor Zeno.

Zeno ordered Theodoric to return to his homeland and his people and to take control of Italy, which was ruled by King Odoacer.

He achieved this in 493, five years after his mission, by inviting the king to dinner and splitting him from shoulder to groin

Clovis, the great Parisian ruler, recognized Theodoric as the ruler of Italy and sent him his sister, Audofleda, to marry to conclude their peaceful treaty.

He is considered a hero of Viking and Ostrogoth who helped unite Europe in a short period of rest in the tumultuous early centuries, and died in 526 AD.

Theodoric the Great (454-526), ​​was king of the Germanic Ostrogoths, ruler of Italy, regent of the Visigoths (511-526), ​​and a viceroy of the Eastern Roman Empire and depicted a Norwegian legend, a woodcut engraving of his image

Theodoric the Great (454-526), ​​was king of the Germanic Ostrogoths, ruler of Italy, regent of the Visigoths (511-526), ​​and a viceroy of the Eastern Roman Empire and depicted a Norwegian legend, a woodcut engraving of his image

Theodoric the Great (454-526), ​​was king of the Germanic Ostrogoths, ruler of Italy, regent of the Visigoths (511-526), ​​and a viceroy of the Eastern Roman Empire and depicted a Norwegian legend, a woodcut engraving of his image

This runestone diagram shows the seven elements of the text, including the first part (1) that claims that the stone was inscribed by Varin for his son, Vamod

This runestone diagram shows the seven elements of the text, including the first part (1) that claims that the stone was inscribed by Varin for his son, Vamod

This runestone diagram shows the seven elements of the text, including the first part (1) that claims that the stone was inscribed by Varin for his son, Vamod

Experts have long been astonished by writing on the 8.5 ft high stone, with most theories claiming to be a dedication to the legendary Ostrogoth king, Theodore the Great, but now it is thought to allude to fear of a repetition of the deadly Late Antique Little Ice Age

Experts have long been astonished by writing on the 8.5 ft high stone, with most theories claiming to be a dedication to the legendary Ostrogoth king, Theodore the Great, but now it is thought to allude to fear of a repetition of the deadly Late Antique Little Ice Age

Experts have long been astonished by writing on the 8.5 ft high stone, with most theories claiming to be a dedication to the legendary Ostrogoth king, Theodore the Great, but now it is thought to allude to fear of a repetition of the deadly Late Antique Little Ice Age

The stone was built in the late 800s near Lake Vattern in south-central Sweden and mentions the Norwegian hero Theodoric

The stone was built in the late 800s near Lake Vattern in south-central Sweden and mentions the Norwegian hero Theodoric

The stone was built in the late 800s near Lake Vattern in south-central Sweden and mentions the Norwegian hero Theodoric

In the sixth century, the temperature dropped when the climate in the world was changed by a series of volcanic eruptions.

The crops were destroyed, the famine was great and the whole species was lost.

Previous analysis has suggested that at least half of the population of the Scandinavian countries died, forcing the time period in the minds of Vikings and influencing the development of Norse mythology.

The researchers agree that the stone speaks of a battle that has been going on for centuries, but believe that it is not a fight with man, but with nature.

In the research, the authors write: “” The conflict between light and darkness, warmth and cold, life and death. “

“A powerful sunstorm colored the sky in dramatic shades of red, the yields of an extremely cold summer and later a solar eclipse occurred just after sunrise,” said Bo Graslund, professor of archeology at Uppsala University.

“Even one of these events would have been enough to arouse the fear of another Fimbul winter,” Professor Graslund added to a winter that lasted three years in Norse mythology, a sign of the arrival of Ragnarok.

Ragnarok is the great battle mentioned in Norse mythology that speaks of the death of many gods, including Odin, Thor and Heimdallr, and throws the world under water – only to come out of it again, rejuvenated and fruitful.

PREVIOUS TRANSLATION THE RUNES ON THE SKIRT-STONE

There are different translations of the inscription and interpretations differ.

One contains details that say that the stone was cut by Varin in memory of his deceased son, Vamod.

“I tell the folk tale / to the young men, who were the two spoils of war, who were taken as spoils of war twelve times, both of them from different men.

“I say this second, who lost his life with the Hreidgoths nine generations ago; and died with them for his guilt.

‘Þjóðríkr the bold,

“leader of naval warriors,

ruled over the banks of the Hreiðsea.

‘He is now armed on his Goth (ice-horse), his shield tied up, the prince of the Mærings.

“I say this the twelfth, where Gunnr’s horse sees food on the battlefield, where twenty kings lie.

‘I say this as the thirteenth, on which twenty kings sat four winters on Sjólund, with four names born of four brothers: five Valkis, sons of Hráðulfr, five Hreiðulfrs, sons of Rugulfr, five Háisl, sons of Hôrðr, five Gunnmundrs / Kynmundrs , sons of Bjôrn.

“Now I tell the stories completely. Someone …

“I tell the folk tale / to the young men, which, according to the line of Ingold, was repaid by the sacrifice of a woman.

‘I tell the folk tale / to the young men, to whom a family member was born, to a brave man. It is Vélinn. He could crush a giant. It is Vélinn … [Nit]

“I tell the folk tale / to the young men: Sibbi van Vé, nonagenarian, fathered (a son). “

While previous experts ‘identified’ Theodoric, Gunnr and the Norse god Thor, the rest of the ‘meaning’ of the text was a mystery.

It was suggested that the two war wars were weapons such as a sword or shield, while Gunnr was perhaps a Valkyrie, known from Norse mythology.

In ‘ruled over the banks of the Hreiðsea,’ Hreiðsea can mean the Mediterranean Sea.

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