Home Australia My daughter’s teacher was telling her how to eat her lunch… so I left her a note in her lunchbox

My daughter’s teacher was telling her how to eat her lunch… so I left her a note in her lunchbox

by Elijah
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A US mother has divided opinion online after sharing the note she left in her daughter's lunchbox, instructing her teacher that she can have lunch at

A mum has divided opinion after sharing a “passive-aggressive” note she left in her daughter’s school lunchbox.

The mother claims she left the note after a daycare teacher told her three-year-old daughter how to eat lunch.

The teacher allegedly made him finish the “good” foods, such as sandwiches, before he could eat the “bad” foods, for example, a cookie.

Shhe decided to take matters into his own hands and share his response with TikTok, under his control. @pezzi.tienda.

The video has already been viewed by more than 52,000 people, and commentators are divided over whether she was right.

In the clip, she reveals a note taped to the top of her daughter’s lunchbox that reads, ‘Hello! Evelyn has our permission to eat lunch in any order she chooses.

A US mother has divided opinion online after sharing the note she left in her daughter’s lunchbox, instructing her teacher that she can eat lunch in “any order of your choosing.”

‘None of your foods are ‘good’ or ‘bad’: they’re just food! Thank you, Caroline and Joey.

She went on to explain the context in the caption, writing, “My three-year-old daughter came home from school yesterday and told me that her teacher told her she had to eat all of her ‘good’ foods before she ate it.” “bad” foods.

‘He couldn’t eat his cookie before eating his sandwich and cucumbers.

‘At the time, I felt a little frustrated by the teacher’s outdated instruction, but I responded by saying, ‘Well, that’s nonsense.’ There are no good foods or bad foods. Food is just food.’

‘I will say that this was not my internal dialogue growing up, but thanks to the information I have from so many great accounts created by moms and experts in the field of childhood and nutrition, I am armed with better answers, knowledge and practices for my children .

Angry, she continued: ‘Three years. At three years old, someone has told him that foods are good or bad.

“I’m very proud that she felt something was wrong, knowing that it wasn’t right enough to tell me.”

‘We talk about it all the time at home. If you only eat carrots or broccoli, your body will not have the protein it needs to build strong muscles.

Surprised to hear this from her son, she decided to take matters into her own hands and share her response on TikTok, under her name @pezzi.shop.

Surprised to hear this from her son, she decided to take matters into her own hands and share her response on TikTok, under her name @pezzi.shop.

Surprised to hear this from her son, she decided to take matters into her own hands and share her response on TikTok, under her name @pezzi.shop.

‘If you only eat chicken, your body won’t have enough energy to do things like run and play all day. We need little bits of everything to make sure we can learn, play, and grow throughout the day.

‘So to the accounts who make sure we have the words, the knowledge and the confidence to write the note and practice it at home, I thank you, thank you, thank you.

‘It has changed our family for the better. “What you do and what you share is very important to young families.”

Viewers flocked to the comments to share their opinion on the lunchbox debate.

One user wrote: ‘As a teacher, your answer is 100 percent correct. “The narrative of ‘good’ and ‘bad’ foods can actually encourage the development of unhealthy eating habits.”

A second agreed: ‘As a former teacher, I thought parents made their children’s lunch with the intention that they would eat it; in any order or quantity.’

Meanwhile, a third angry parent commented: ‘You’re better than me because I’d be in nursery!’

A fourth wrote: ‘As long as my daughter is full enough to concentrate, I don’t care which part of her lunch she eats first.

Viewers flocked to the comments to share their opinion on the lunchbox debate.

Viewers flocked to the comments to share their opinion on the lunchbox debate.

Viewers flocked to the comments to share their opinion on the lunchbox debate.

“Anyway, it’s usually mostly fruit and turkey, but for all I care, I might start with Oreos.”

However, other parents were not convinced, with one arguing, “That’s great until they’re in third grade and they’re still as little as a kindergartener.” I beg my son to first eat his sandwich which he needs to grow.’

Another added: “I’m sure the teacher wasn’t trying to be mean.” Maybe you could have talked to the teacher instead of writing a passive-aggressive note in your three-year-old’s lunch?

Someone else asked: ‘Why send your child to a school you don’t agree with? Plus, I guarantee other kids will tell him the same thing. Are you going to write notes to them too?

Meanwhile, another chimed in: ‘And why did we need to see this note? What did it mean to someone to post this online?

The heated debate comes just after another dad started an online conversation after sharing a photo of the vegan lunchbox his son was given at a birthday party.

British mother Emma Lougar had shared a tweet on X, formerly known as Twitter, showing off a thoughtful vegan lunchbox made for her son at a birthday party.

The contents of the personalized meal were clearly labeled and consisted of a “vegan” chicken burger, “eggless” minis, sweet potato falafel bites, and a vegan sausage roll.

She explained that she offered to provide the food for her son and was delighted that his dietary needs were met, but not everyone in the comments agreed.

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