Advertisements
Weightlifters can improve their technique by listening to music that drops if they do not perform well, scientists think
Advertisements

Gym visitors can improve their technique by listening to music that drops if they do not perform well, scientists say.

Researchers attached sensors to 31 amateur weightlifters who followed their shape while performing a deadlift.

If it had to be adjusted, their music would noticeably fade until they had corrected the exercise.

Reinforced with multiple repetitions, the weightlifters were able to practice until they were perfect, preventing injuries and maximizing benefits.

Advertisements

And the experts in Belgium said the results were just as successful compared to a personal trainer who gave instructions.

Weightlifters can improve their technique by listening to music that drops if they do not perform well, scientists think

Weightlifters can improve their technique by listening to music that drops if they do not perform well, scientists think

The research was conducted by Valerio Lorenzoni, an aerodynamic and aero-acoustic engineer, Ghent University.

Although not yet on the market, the music-based system can be used during home workouts, the researchers said.

Advertisements

They wrote in PLOS ONE magazine: & # 39; Aside from learning the technique, the system could also be used by experienced athletes.

HOW POWERFUL IS MUSIC IN EXERCISING?

A study by Brunel University London has shown that hearing Marvin Gaye & # 39; s & # 39; I Heard It Through The Grapevine & # 39; while active, it stimulates the area of ​​the brain that is associated with relieving fatigue.

The study participants, who only heard that one tune, claimed that listening to the 11-minute track seemed like their training routine was over in just 60 seconds, with many additions they found it easier and less boring when the song was played .

Study author Dr. Marcelo Bigliassi said: & # 39; Music is a very powerful stimulant and can be used to alleviate negative physical sensations that usually occur during exercise. & # 39;

Research by Daniel Levitin at McGill University in Canada showed that music can ease the pain of exertion.

Advertisements

Listening to music causes our brains to release natural analgesic chemicals called opioids – the same family of drugs as heroin and morphine.

It seems that these chemicals are the reason why the music has such a powerful effect on our well-being and makes exercise less painful.

The other chemical brain music that produces in us is dopamine. This is made when we anticipate listening to our favorite sounds.

The academics said it could further improve their technique by discovering small aspects of their movement that are not fully visible with the eye & # 39 ;.

& # 39; When using the biofeedback system, several participants reported that they discovered details about their movements that they were not aware of, & # 39; the team added.

Advertisements

Dr. Lorenzoni and colleagues designed the music-based biofeedback system. All weightlifters had varied experience in the gym.

They were split into two groups – the first all received feedback from their deadlift technique directly from a personal trainer.

For simplicity, feedback was given for just two deadlift technique parameters – to keep the spine neutral with the shoulders pulled back and to hold the barbell close to the shins in a vertical motion.

The personal trainer told the first group orally to keep the back straight and the shoulders withdrawn & # 39; and & # 39; holding the bar closed and pushing the knees back & # 39 ;.

The second half of the group wore 22 body sensors that monitor the deadlift technique, usually placed on the spine, thighs, and top of the feet.

Advertisements

They then performed three times ten repetitions of deadlifts while listening to music composed by the researchers, after having completed the correct form before the study began.

Bad technology reduced the sound quality of the music, while improved technology restored it.

For example, if the back deviates from the correct position during the deadlift, the baseline in the music would deform.

If the barbell drifted away from the correct vertical up and down movement, the sound would change until the participant moved the barbell back to their toes.

The same song was played during the experiments, and although the participants did not know the song, they could recognize a change in sound.

In one study, gym visitors had attached sensors to them while they were performing a deadlift that monitored their shape. They were mainly placed on the spine and feet to measure the neutrality of the spine and whether the barbell moved vertically
Advertisements

In one study, gym visitors had attached sensors to them while they were performing a deadlift that monitored their shape. They were mainly placed on the spine and feet to measure the neutrality of the spine and whether the barbell moved vertically

In one study, gym visitors had attached sensors to them while they were performing a deadlift that monitored their shape. They were mainly placed on the spine and feet to measure the neutrality of the spine and whether the barbell moved vertically

The researchers discovered that musical feedback was just as effective as a personal trainer for improving the technique, with most improvements in weightlifters for beginners.

All participants saw their deadlifts improve and reported similar levels of clarity and pleasure using a questionnaire.

The researchers said: & # 39; The reason was that music works as a natural reward and therefore the sound quality can be used as an incentive for learning amplification.

Advertisements

& # 39; Given that music is a natural reward, it follows that good versus poor sound quality can send actions to get the reward. & # 39;

The authors said that more research could investigate whether weight lifters remember what they learned in the long term, and whether music works when weight is more challenging.

But the findings suggest that the method can be applied to other movements, including squats.

HOW DO YOU PERFORM THE PERFECT DEADLIFT?

Place the barbell on the floor with suitable weight plates – depending on the fitness level.

Beginners usually only start lifting the barbell, because a typical barbell itself weighs between 25 and 45 pounds.

Advertisements

Walk towards the bar – do not pull it towards you – so that your shins rest against it.

With your feet flat under the shoulder of the barbell width, the bar should be in the middle of your foot as if you were cutting it in half.

Squat down as if you were sitting on a chair and grab the bar with your hands about shoulder width apart.

Lift your chest, pull your shoulders back and look straight ahead instead of up or down. This is called a setting when you ensure that you are in the correct position before lifting.

Lift the bar, keeping it close to your legs, and concentrate on bringing the weight back to your heels instead of forward in your toes.

Advertisements

The back must be completely flat and straight.

Lift to thigh level while turning on the gluteal and hamstring, pause and then return to the starting position under control.

. [TagsToTranslate] Dailymail