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Murderer who killed 19 disabled people in Tokyo allows the death penalty

Murderer who stabbed 19 dead in the Japanese massacre in care homes receives the death penalty

  • Satoshi Uematsu, a former relief worker, did not deny his involvement in the rampage
  • In 2016, Uematsu is said to have killed 19 disabled people in a city near Tokyo
  • Reportedly, Uematsu said he wanted to eradicate all people with disabilities because he claimed that people with disabilities “only cause accident”

Japanese prosecutors called on Monday for a 30-year-old man to be executed for murdering 19 residents of disability care institutions in one of the worst mass killings in the country.

Satoshi Uematsu, 30, a former employee in a nursing home, did not dispute his involvement in the stabbing rampage in 2016 during his first lawsuit last month in Yokohama.

But his lawyers put forward a plea of ​​non-guilty and said their client had a “mental disorder” related to his use of marijuana.

In this file shot on July 27, 2016, the suspect of murdering Satoshi Uematsu sits in the back seat of a police vehicle when he returns to Tsukui police station in Sagamihara, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan

In this file shot on July 27, 2016, the suspect of murdering Satoshi Uematsu sits in the back seat of a police vehicle when he returns to Tsukui police station in Sagamihara, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan

Uematsu (photo in 2016) claimed through his lawyer that he was not guilty and claimed that he had a 'mental disorder' due to cannabis use at the time of the attack.

Uematsu (photo in 2016) claimed through his lawyer that he was not guilty and claimed that he had a 'mental disorder' due to cannabis use at the time of the attack.

Uematsu (photo in 2016) claimed through his lawyer that he was not guilty and claimed that he had a ‘mental disorder’ due to cannabis use at the time of the attack.

Kaoru Irikura (C), head of Tsukui Yamayuri-en care center, meets the media for a lawsuit about a man accused of murdering 19 disabled people in 2016 in a Japanese care home in Yokohama, Kanagawa Prefecture on January 8, 2020

Kaoru Irikura (C), head of Tsukui Yamayuri-en care center, meets the media for a lawsuit about a man accused of murdering 19 disabled people in 2016 in a Japanese care home in Yokohama, Kanagawa Prefecture on January 8, 2020

Kaoru Irikura (C), head of Tsukui Yamayuri-en care center, meets the media for a lawsuit about a man accused of murdering 19 disabled people in 2016 in a Japanese care home in Yokohama, Kanagawa Prefecture on January 8, 2020

Prosecutors have argued that Uematsu was able to take responsibility for the attack, adding the rampage was “inhumane” and left “no room for leniency.”

Hearings should be completed later this week, with the verdict expected on March 16, according to the local court.

Uematsu has reportedly said he wanted to exterminate all people with disabilities in the horrific attack on Tsukui Yamayuri Center in the city of Sagamihara, southwest of Tokyo, because he claimed that people with disabilities “only cause accident.”

Wheelchairs attend a lottery for tickets to the court session of Satoshi Uematsu, accused of killing 19 disabled people in a Japanese care home in 2016, outside Yokohama court on January 8, 2020

Wheelchairs attend a lottery for tickets to the court session of Satoshi Uematsu, accused of killing 19 disabled people in a Japanese care home in 2016, outside Yokohama court on January 8, 2020

Wheelchairs attend a lottery for tickets to the court session of Satoshi Uematsu, accused of killing 19 disabled people in a Japanese care home in 2016, outside Yokohama court on January 8, 2020

In addition to the 19 people killed, 26 people were injured.

Uematsu’s beliefs shocked Japan, with experts and activists asking questions about whether others might share the same opinion.

Japan has made an effort to increase accessibility – especially in Tokyo prior to this year’s Paralympic Games – and activists welcomed the election of two lawmakers with disabilities last year.

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