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The well-preserved mummy of a woman with fur underwear and foal hides in the photo is found in the coldest inhabited region of the world

The well-preserved mummy of a woman with fur underwear and foal hides has been found in the coldest inhabited region of the world.

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The woman – presumably dating from the mid-19th century – was dug up with a Christian cross on her chest.

The remains were found in a sand grave in the permafrost area of ​​Yakutia, Siberia, near the Russian Arctic, where the temperature can drop to -76 ° F (-60 ° C).

The archaeologist who had found the mummy originally intended to remove his skull and take it away for further investigation.

However, after examining the well-preserved remains, she decided she could not do this for ethical reasons.

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The well-preserved mummy of a woman with fur underwear and foal hides in the photo is found in the coldest inhabited region of the world

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The well-preserved mummy of a woman with fur underwear and foal hides in the photo is found in the coldest inhabited region of the world

The woman - presumably dating from the mid-19th century - was dug up with a Christian cross, pictured, on her chest

The woman - presumably dating from the mid-19th century - was dug up with a Christian cross, pictured, on her chest

The woman – presumably dating from the mid-19th century – was dug up with a Christian cross, pictured, on her chest

& # 39; Her soft fabrics have been very well preserved, & # 39; said archaeologist Elena Solovyova of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia).

& # 39; This was a natural mummification. & # 39;

The copper cross and clothing found on the woman overthrew the theory that archaeologists had found Lensky Ostrog, the first Russian settlement in this region. that would go back to the conquest of Siberia in the 1630s.

Instead, experts now believe that the burIall sites must date from the 19th century – and not before.

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They now also believe that the preserved woman was an ethnic Yakut – a resident from the largest and coldest region of Siberia – rather than a Russian, and that some of her clothing was made by machine.

& # 39; Maybe she was buried and frozen in winter & # 39 ;, said Dr. Solovyova.

& # 39; The lower part of her clothing has been preserved. & # 39;

& # 39; These were fur underwear, traditional Yakutian clothing, plus stockings up to the hips, made from the skin of a fur with fur in it. & # 39;

Her leather stockings had so-called & # 39; torbasa & # 39; – traditional Yakutian soft boots – that also had a fur made of foal or cowhide.

The remains were found in a sand grave in the permafrost area of ​​Yakutia, Siberia, near the Russian Arctic, where the temperature can drop to -76 ° F (-60 ° C)
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The remains were found in a sand grave in the permafrost area of ​​Yakutia, Siberia, near the Russian Arctic, where the temperature can drop to -76 ° F (-60 ° C)

The remains were found in a sand grave in the permafrost area of ​​Yakutia, Siberia, near the Russian Arctic, where the temperature can drop to -76 ° F (-60 ° C)

The archaeologist who had found the mummy originally intended to remove his skull and take it away for further investigation. However, after examining the well-preserved remains, she decided she could not do this for ethical reasons

The archaeologist who had found the mummy originally intended to remove his skull and take it away for further investigation. However, after examining the well-preserved remains, she decided she could not do this for ethical reasons

The archaeologist who had found the mummy originally intended to remove his skull and take it away for further investigation. However, after examining the well-preserved remains, she decided she could not do this for ethical reasons

The copper cross and clothing found on the woman destroyed the theory that archaeologists had found Lensky Ostrog, depicted in the impression of this artist, who was the first Russian settlement in this region. that would go back to the conquest of Siberia in the 1630s

The copper cross and clothing found on the woman destroyed the theory that archaeologists had found Lensky Ostrog, depicted in the impression of this artist, who was the first Russian settlement in this region. that would go back to the conquest of Siberia in the 1630s

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The copper cross and clothing found on the woman destroyed the theory that archaeologists had found Lensky Ostrog, depicted in the impression of this artist, who was the first Russian settlement in this region. that would go back to the conquest of Siberia in the 1630s

& # 39; We did not do the complete morphological investigation of (this) woman, even though there was a plan to take the skulls of people buried in this cemetery to understand if they were Russians or Yakuts, & # 39 ; said Dr. Solovyova.

& # 39; I could not do this for ethical reasons … The woman was mummified, not just scattered bones, & # 39;

& # 39; I just couldn't force myself to separate her head from (her) body. & # 39;

& # 39; But I am sure this woman was Yakut. & # 39;

Instead, experts believe that the cemetery in the photo dates from the 19th century - and was not suggested before
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Instead, experts believe that the cemetery in the photo dates from the 19th century - and was not suggested before

Instead, experts believe that the cemetery depicted dates from the 19th century – and was not suggested before

Archaeologists now also believe that the preserved woman was an ethnic Yakut - a local from the largest and coldest region of Siberia - instead of a Russian and that part of her clothing was made by machine

Archaeologists now also believe that the preserved woman was an ethnic Yakut - a local from the largest and coldest region of Siberia - instead of a Russian and that part of her clothing was made by machine

Archaeologists now also believe that the preserved woman was an ethnic Yakut – a local from the largest and coldest region of Siberia – instead of a Russian and that part of her clothing was made by machine

& # 39; We have not done the complete morphological investigation of (this) woman, even though there was a plan to take the skulls of people buried in this cemetery to understand whether they were Russians or Yakuts, & # 39; said Dr. Solovyova, centered here with her colleagues & # 39; s

& # 39; We have not done the complete morphological investigation of (this) woman, even though there was a plan to take the skulls of people buried in this cemetery to understand whether they were Russians or Yakuts, & # 39; said Dr. Solovyova, centered here with her colleagues & # 39; s

& # 39; We have not done the complete morphological investigation of (this) woman, even though there was a plan to take the skulls of people buried in this cemetery to understand whether they were Russians or Yakuts, & # 39; said Dr. Solovyova, centered here with her colleagues & # 39; s

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