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Mum is slammed for putting so much ‘junk food’ in her children’s lunchboxes

An Australian mother has sparked debate with a photo of her children’s lunch boxes filled with chips, chocolate and custard.

The woman, who shared images of the daily treats on Facebook on August 1, prepared a number of healthy storage containers with snow peas, fruit and a trail mix in them, combined with some processed snacks.

“Try snow peas and cheds this week. Riley loved helping me with the homemade trail mix of yogurt-covered sultanas, macadamias, walnuts, pecans, almonds, pistachios, mini MnMs, and banana chips,” she said.

“Riley asked for mini croissants with ham and cheese and Blair asked for triangular Nutella sandwich as always. Both Shaun and Connor both have mini versions of these.”

The woman, who shared images of the daily treats on Facebook on August 1, prepared a number of healthy storage containers with snow peas, fruit and a trail mix in them, combined with some processed snacks

The woman, who shared images of the daily treats on Facebook on August 1, prepared a number of healthy storage containers with snow peas, fruit and a trail mix in them, combined with some processed snacks

While many parents praised her efforts to pack a balanced lunch box, others weren’t kind to the amount of “plastic” it contained.

“That’s a lot of food and junk,” one woman wrote.

‘Gosh, we’re a plastic world, aren’t we. I remember the primary school kids had to take all the wrappers home so I think they’re still in place,” said another.

A third added: ‘We’ve never had all the packet foods, let alone chocolate. Savory is best with good fruit and vegetables’.

The mother replied, “Guys if you don’t like it, just scroll through, it’s not hard. I don’t have to explain myself or my family to anyone here, I do what’s best for us and that’s all I care about.”

Sydney dietitian Susie Burrell said there are many foods you should include in your kids’ midday meal, but she finds it easiest to follow a quick and easy four-step formula.

“With my twins back to school, I thought a little lunchbox inspiration might come in handy for parents,” Susie posted on Instagram.

A dietitian has revealed exactly what should be packed in your child's school lunch box to keep them satiated and well-fed throughout the school day (the ideal school lunch pictured)

A dietitian has revealed exactly what should be packed in your child’s school lunch box to keep them satiated and well-fed throughout the school day (the ideal school lunch pictured)

Susie Burrell (pictured), from Sydney, said there are many foods you should include in your kids' midday meal, but she finds it easiest to follow a quick four-step formula.

Susie Burrell (pictured), from Sydney, said there are many foods you should include in your kids’ midday meal, but she finds it easiest to follow a quick four-step formula.

What is Susie’s four-step formula?

1. Sandwich, wrap or salad with some form of protein..

2. Fruits and sliced ​​vegetables.

3. High-protein snack such as yogurt or cheese.

4. Something fun or ‘tasty’ like homemade protein balls, healthy chips or cookies.

Susie’s formula means you should always have a sandwich, wrap, or salad with protein in their box, as well as fruits and veggies, a high-protein snack, and a “fun and delicious item.”

For a high-protein snack, Susie prefers yogurt or cheese, while her favorite ‘sweetie’ foods are healthy chocolate digestifs, protein balls, chocolate rice cakes and healthy chips.

This week, Susie is feeding her twins two wraps with chicken, cucumber, and hummus as their main meal.

The twins will then enjoy some yogurt, cherry tomatoes, sliced ​​cucumber, a satsuma and half a banana for their healthy snacks.

Their ‘treat’ is homemade protein balls and healthy chips.

To vary the main meal, Susie said she will also make ham and avocado sandwiches on some days.

On others, she does shredded chicken with avocado and tomatoes or a homemade overnight oat bowl.

The most important thing about this element of the box is that it contains some protein to keep kids full for longer.

The most important thing in both your children's meals and snacks is that they are high in protein (lunch box pictured) as this will keep your children full for longer

The most important thing in both your children’s meals and snacks is that they are high in protein (lunch box pictured) as this will keep your children full for longer

The biggest mistake parents make with their children’s lunch boxes, according to the dietitian, is overloading them with too many carbohydrates.

While Susie admits that carbs like bread, rice, cereal, pasta, fruit, jam and honey are vital for brain function — and especially for active kids — she also said these carbs are often processed, and so not great for their health. general health.

“A quick scan of a typical lunch box will generally reveal some sort of sandwich or wrap, a piece of fruit or two, the occasional vegetable, and various packaged snacks,” she previously told me. Essential children.

“While on the surface this lunchbox mix would be perfect for carb-rich foods, processed carbs completely dominate the mix at the expense of protein-rich foods and good fats.”

Susie explained that the problem with processed carbohydrates is that they are digested very quickly, which can increase children’s hunger pangs later on and cause them to overeat when they get back from school.

If they eat too many carbohydrates and don’t exercise much, children can also gain weight.

The main mistake parents make with their kids' lunch boxes, according to the dietitian, is getting them too many carbs;  you should avoid this (ideal lunch box pictured)

The main mistake parents make with their kids’ lunch boxes, according to the dietitian, is getting them too many carbs; you should avoid this (ideal lunch box pictured)

Susie recommends limiting carbohydrate-based snacks and eating plenty of cut fruits and vegetables instead

Susie recommends limiting carbohydrate-based snacks and eating plenty of cut fruits and vegetables instead

The dietitian added that the solution to the lunchbox problem is simple: add a lot more protein to their midday meal and encourage them to take a break early in the school day to manage their appetite.

For the morning break, Susie recommends a vegetable- and protein-rich snack to lock in hunger until lunch and later in the day — something like baby cucumbers, tomatoes, chopped carrots, and hummus.

She also said you should only include one piece of fruit a day and limit carbohydrate-based snacks.

‘Make sure your child’s break includes protein-rich foods. Good choices are kids’ yogurts with no added sugar, cheese and crackers, roasted fava beans or chickpeas, a boiled egg, a mini wrap with a little ham or chicken or cheese, or a homemade protein ball (minus the nuts),’ Susie said.

A reasonable serving of protein for a child is between five and 10 grams per serving.

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