Moving Trucks Seen at Hunter Biden’s $5.4 Million Rental Home in Venice Beach

0

Hunter Biden appears to have moved out of the $5.4 million luxury home he rented in Venice Beach, California, amid a crime and homelessness wave that has hit the beachfront city of Los Angeles.

President Joe Biden’s son reportedly paid $25,000 a month to rent the three-story property on Venice’s canals — just steps from the beach.

But on Monday, DailyMail.com spotted a moving truck outside the palatial home with furniture loaded into it. Father of five Hunter, 51, moved into the stylish property at the end of 2020 with wife Melissa and their son Beau.

Venice Beach residents have complained of an increase in crime as homelessness in the area has increased during the pandemic.

Moving trucks were spotted at Hunter Biden's Venice Beach rental home this week, DailyMail.com can reveal

Moving trucks were spotted at Hunter Biden’s Venice Beach rental home this week, DailyMail.com can reveal

Father of five Hunter, 51, moved into the property at the end of 2020 with wife Melissa and their son Beau Beau

Father of five Hunter, 51, moved into the property at the end of 2020 with wife Melissa and their son Beau Beau

Now the president's son appears to have moved out of the $5.4 million house amid a crime and homelessness wave that has hit the beachfront city of Los Angeles

Now the president’s son appears to have moved out of the $5.4 million house amid a crime and homelessness wave that has hit the beachfront city of Los Angeles

Venice Beach residents have complained of a rise in crime as homelessness has increased in the area during the pandemic

Venice Beach residents have complained of a rise in crime as homelessness has increased in the area during the pandemic

Hunter reportedly paid $25,000 a month to rent the three-story property on Venice's canals

Hunter reportedly paid $25,000 a month to rent the three-story property on Venice’s canals

The homeless population in Venice has mushroomed – just 175 people lived in poverty in 2014 and more than 1,200 five years later – but the situation has spiraled out of control in recent months.

Exclusive DailyMail.com photos from last month show tent residents who have left Skid Row in downtown LA and the highway ramps in Long Beach for Venice Beach, turning a short stretch of prime property just south of the Santa Monica border into a focal point between business interests and those who have been evicted from their homes.

While tourists and locals alike still frequent the iconic boardwalk — a place they’ve long shared with the weird and the wacky — the number of visitors has dwindled as they deal with an ever-growing army of homeless people and the crime that plagues them. accompanies.

Residents in the area, such as Hunter, have considered moving, but house prices have fallen 10 to 30 percent.

Crocodile Dundee star Paul Hogan, 81, who lives in the area, warned the homeless away. “This is my house, not yours,” he wrote on a note he had hung on the gate of his $3.5 million house in Venice Beach.

Hogan has complained that he is homesick and desperate to return to his native Australia, but he does not want to go through a two-week Covid quarantine. “I’m like a kangaroo in a Russian zoo, I don’t belong here,” he said.

Exclusive DailyMail.com photos from last month show tent dwellers leaving downtown LA's Skid Row for iconic Venice Beach tourist destination

Exclusive DailyMail.com photos from last month show tent dwellers leaving downtown LA’s Skid Row for iconic Venice Beach tourist destination

The homeless population has exploded in Venice - in 2014 just 175 people were living in poverty and five years later that number rose to more than 1,200 - but in recent months the situation has spiraled out of control

The homeless population has exploded in Venice – in 2014 just 175 people were living in poverty and five years later that number rose to more than 1,200 – but in recent months the situation has spiraled out of control

Secret Service agents sitting outside Hunter's house have had to deal with the stench of a small encampment across a parking lot

Secret Service agents sitting outside Hunter’s house have had to deal with the stench of a small encampment across a parking lot

The encampments have crept closer to Venice’s famously picturesque canals.

Secret Service agents sitting outside Hunter’s house have had to deal with the stench of a small encampment across a parking lot.

The tent city itself has its dramas, just like any other human settlement. Last month, a 30-year-old woman from Virginia gave birth in one of the oceanfront camps, the Venice Stream reported.

On April 28, a homeless man was shot and injured. The shooter quietly walked away. The victim is not cooperating with the police. Earlier that same week, a tent was deliberately set on fire. A local woman tells how she was chased by a man with a sword.

Police officers drop by regularly, more to show their presence than to actually make arrests, say entrepreneurs on Ocean Front Walk, the boardwalk’s official name.

The homeless camps have crept closer to Venice's famously picturesque canals, where a moving truck stands outside Hunter's house

The homeless camps have crept closer to Venice’s famously picturesque canals, where a moving truck stands outside Hunter’s house

Hunter had moved into the 3,700-square-foot property after splitting his time between his home state of Delaware and his Hollywood Hills trail

Hunter had moved into the 3,700-square-foot property after splitting his time between his home state of Delaware and his Hollywood Hills trail

Hunter was supposed to rent the property from Sweetgreen's co-founder and CEO Jonathan Neman for $25,000 a month

Hunter was supposed to rent the property from Sweetgreen’s co-founder and CEO Jonathan Neman for $25,000 a month

The house also had a terrace furnished with seating, a fireplace and a breathtaking view of the idyllic neighborhood

The house also had a terrace furnished with seating, a fireplace and a breathtaking view of the idyllic neighborhood

When DailyMail.com visited Venice Beach, there were syringes — one with a needle still attached — nestled in the sand in a children’s playground on the beach, symbolizing how the people the area was designed for are now being pushed out.

“I can’t even walk my dog ​​or cycle along the Venice Beach bike path anymore,” said Heather Sullivan, a long-time resident of Venice. “It’s too scary and just too violent.

“We’ve had countless dog thefts and it’s just heartbreaking and many of the animals in these camps are not treated well.”

.