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Tracey Dunne, who has terminal cancer, was allowed to stroke her beloved horse Malone one last time

Moving images show a terminally ill cancer patient stroking her beloved horse for the last time.

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Tracey Dunne, in his fifties, receives palliative care in a hospice in Plymouth. It is unclear what type of cancer Mrs. Dunne has or how long she is expected to live.

Desperate to see her horse Malone again, the staff arranged for him to be transferred from his stable.

Mrs. Dunne, a building conversation consultant, can be seen as she feeds and caresses Malone alongside her husband Tim.

Dunne, who has been married to his wife for almost 30 years, says he & # 39; will always remember the big smile on his beautiful wife's face & # 39 ;.

Tracey Dunne, who has terminal cancer, was allowed to stroke her beloved horse Malone one last time

Tracey Dunne, who has terminal cancer, was allowed to stroke her beloved horse Malone one last time

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She is being cared for in a St. Luke & # 39; s Hospice. Before she fell ill, Mrs. Dunne, who has no children, could often be discovered.

& # 39; She has always enjoyed being on Dartmoor, enjoying nature and getting muddy, & # 39; said her husband.

& # 39; Tracey is so talented, friendly and always thinks of others. One of the many memories I cherish is her pink pajamas, a charity abseil at the Civic Center. & # 39;

Speaking of her horse, Mr. Dunne added: & I will always be so grateful to St Luke and remember the big smile they showed on my beautiful wife's face. & # 39;

Dunne claims that he respects & # 39; a & # 39; for the care his wife received.

& # 39; If you use the term & # 39; hospice care & # 39; hear, it is frightening and although the fear does not disappear completely, I am impressed by the way St. Luke has been with us everywhere, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; It has given us both such a & # 39; n compelling sense of peace. & # 39;

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When Mrs. Dunne had to take care, the couple was visited at home by a nurse named Derek.

& # 39; It was not only his specialist knowledge that helped, but also his empathy, & # 39; said Mr. Dunne.

& # 39; He had a very good relationship with Tracey and knew exactly how to encourage her to describe her pain and other symptoms so that he could manage them expertly.

& # 39; When Tracey then had to be in the hospital, the St Luke team at Brent Ward (Plymouth) always treated us with the utmost respect and did their best despite many other demands on their time. & # 39;

Moving images show Mrs. Dunne feeding Malone and stroking her husband Tim (pictured together). She receives palliative care in a hospice in Plymouth

Moving images show Mrs. Dunne feeding Malone and stroking her husband Tim (pictured together). She receives palliative care in a hospice in Plymouth

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Moving images show Mrs. Dunne feeding Malone and stroking her husband Tim (pictured together). She receives palliative care in a hospice in Plymouth

Dunne, who has been married to his wife for almost 30 years, says he & # 39; will always remember the big smile on his beautiful wife's face & # 39; when Malone was transferred from his stable

Dunne, who has been married to his wife for almost 30 years, says he & # 39; will always remember the big smile on his beautiful wife's face & # 39; when Malone was transferred from his stable

Dunne, who has been married to his wife for almost 30 years, says he & # 39; will always remember the big smile on his beautiful wife's face & # 39; when Malone was transferred from his stable

Mrs. Dunne now lives full-time in the hospice with her parakeet Betty. Her husband noticed how comfortable the setup is.

& # 39; The realization that Tracey needed to be integrated into the hospice building was daunting & # 39 ;, he said. & # 39; (But) it is not at all what you would expect.

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& # 39; In a sense, there are many parallels with our house because it is light, airy and has beautiful views.

& # 39; It has been a comfort to both of us that I have been able to stay on Tracey's side, and from the nurses to the cleaning staff and receptionists, friendliness is everywhere. & # 39;

With Mrs. Dunne informed that her illness is terminal, the couple has planned her funeral.

& # 39; Tracey and I always speak openly with each other and with her who receive such expert care, we have had the space to have difficult but necessary conversations, & # 39; said Mr. Dunne.

& # 39; As she wished, we could even discuss her wishes for her funeral. & # 39;

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Before Mrs. Dunne fell ill, the couple often took part in the St. Luke lottery. Players donate £ 1 ($ 1.23) per week to the cause and participate in a drive to win 15 cash prizes.

& # 39; We have been playing the St Luke & # 39; s lottery for years because we are aware of the excellent work of the charity & # 39 ;, he said. & # 39; We never thought we would need the service

& # 39; I have often joked about the man who collects our subs, has a talent for calling when I am in my pocket until the last five. & # 39;

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