Home Australia Mount Etna sends incredible volcanic smoke rings rising into the sky

Mount Etna sends incredible volcanic smoke rings rising into the sky

0 comment
Italy's Mount Etna put on a spectacular spectacle for amazed tourists as they watched the volcano send smoke rings into the sky.

<!–

<!–

<!– <!–

<!–

<!–

<!–

Mount Etna put on a spectacular spectacle for awestruck tourists as they watched the volcano send smoke rings into the sky.

This rare phenomenon, known as volcanic smoke rings, can only form in a circular volcanic vent and requires a calm atmosphere.

Despite the name, the rings are technically not made of smoke, but rather condensed gases, primarily water vapor, that escaped magma and shot from the volcano’s vent.

The result of these hot volcanic gases suddenly escaping from the circular vent in short pulses is what creates the ring shape.

Italy's Mount Etna put on a spectacular spectacle for amazed tourists as they watched the volcano send smoke rings into the sky.

Italy’s Mount Etna put on a spectacular spectacle for amazed tourists as they watched the volcano send smoke rings into the sky.

The rare phenomenon, known as volcanic smoke rings, can only form in a circular volcanic vent and requires a calm atmosphere.

The rare phenomenon, known as volcanic smoke rings, can only form in a circular volcanic vent and requires a calm atmosphere.

The rare phenomenon, known as volcanic smoke rings, can only form in a circular volcanic vent and requires a calm atmosphere.

Despite the name, the rings are technically not made of smoke, but rather condensed gases, primarily water vapor, that escaped magma and shot from the volcano's vent.

Despite the name, the rings are technically not made of smoke, but rather condensed gases, primarily water vapor, that escaped magma and shot from the volcano's vent.

Despite the name, the rings are technically not made of smoke, but rather condensed gases, primarily water vapor, that escaped magma and shot from the volcano’s vent.

The result of these hot volcanic gases suddenly escaping from the circular vent in short pulses is what creates the ring shape.

The result of these hot volcanic gases suddenly escaping from the circular vent in short pulses is what creates the ring shape.

The result of these hot volcanic gases suddenly escaping from the circular vent in short pulses is what creates the ring shape.

Volcanic smoke rings like this have been documented around the world, but multiple displays like the one on Mount Etna are extremely rare.

Even if a volcano has the ability to create smoke rings, strong winds will prevent them from forming.

The volcano, located on the island of Sicily at the southern tip of Italy, is the most active volcano in Europe and rises 11,000 feet above the town of Brontë.

A perfectly circular volcanic smoke ring blown by Mount Etna in the town of Brontë in Sicily, Italy

A perfectly circular volcanic smoke ring blown by Mount Etna in the town of Brontë in Sicily, Italy

A perfectly circular volcanic smoke ring blown by Mount Etna in the town of Brontë in Sicily, Italy

Volcanic smoke rings like this have been documented around the world, but multiple displays like this in Sicily are extremely rare.

Volcanic smoke rings like this have been documented around the world, but multiple displays like this in Sicily are extremely rare.

Volcanic smoke rings like this have been documented around the world, but multiple displays like this in Sicily are extremely rare.

The volcano, located on the island of Sicily at the southern tip of Italy, is the most active volcano in Europe and rises 11,000 feet above the town of Brontë.

The volcano, located on the island of Sicily at the southern tip of Italy, is the most active volcano in Europe and rises 11,000 feet above the town of Brontë.

The volcano, located on the island of Sicily at the southern tip of Italy, is the most active volcano in Europe and rises 11,000 feet above the town of Brontë.

It erupts frequently and its explosions have been closely monitored and documented for more than 3,500 years.

It erupts frequently and its explosions have been closely monitored and documented for more than 3,500 years.

It erupts frequently and its explosions have been closely monitored and documented for more than 3,500 years.

It erupts frequently and its explosions have been closely monitored and documented for more than 3,500 years.

Over a six-month period in 2021, Etna emitted so much volcanic material that it grew in height by almost 30 meters.

Etna’s most destructive eruption occurred in 1669, when approximately fourteen towns and cities were destroyed by lava flows or earthquakes that followed the eruption.

You may also like